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Thread: OpenSUSE 64 bit

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Nutley, NJ
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    551
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    OpenSUSE 64 bit

    I downloaded OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit Live GNOME ISO file and I burned it onto a blank CD-R disc. I rebooted my System76 Lemur Ultra Thin (lemu4) notebook PC and I booted off the disc. OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit is compatible with my System76 Lemur Ultra Thin (lemu4). Everything works right out the box. There are no additional device drivers that I need to install to make my PC hardware work properly.

    OpenSUSE is vastly different from Ubuntu. It is designed primarily for system administrators that require up to date but not bleeding edge software packages that prefer the YaST GUI to configure and setup their systems. Ubuntu still relies heavily on the terminal to do most of the heavy lifting especially when it comes to installing and configuring security tools. There are no paid software apps in the main OpenSUSE software repositories which is another major difference. You get your choice of GNOME or KDE when you download the DVD ISO and you can easily setup full-disk encryption using the YaST installation program. VPN protocols such as OpenVPN, CISCO IPSec, and PPTP are fully supported right out of the box. System hardening is done through YaST and it is granular although there are pre-configured settings based upon your organization's needs or if you are a single home workstation user.

    OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit is very nice. YaST alone makes it worthwhile if you are a systems administrator or if you like to tinker with your GNU/Linux distribution without having to resort to the terminal too often to get the job done. OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit is considered to be the experimental and testing version of SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop which you must purchase in order to install and update annually.

    I chose to stick with Ubuntu because System76 offers official help and technical support for Ubuntu exclusively. I have a two year warranty and support contract with System76 for my Lemur Ultra Thin (lemu4) notebook PC. Ubuntu 12.10 64 bit is going to be released next Thursday on October 18th, 2012 so it pays for me to wait a couple of more days and to keep running Software Updater in the meantime. I like paid apps a lot and they extend the functionality and add features that are useful to me. In my mind, Ubuntu is certainly one of the largest GNU/Linux distributions in terms of the number of users and it offers the Ubuntu Software Center, Ubuntu One, Ubuntu Unity and it also has the largest software repository available. You can add PPAs quite easily and it is focused on the desktop user experience. Ubuntu is a large community and most of its users are quite friendly and they are willing to offer help and support right away.

    However, OpenSUSE 64 bit would be my second choice if I had to use another GNU/Linux distribution. I could feel very comfortable using it and be able to focus on my work or task at hand without too many problems by switching to OpenSUSE 64 bit. I would recommend it to experienced GNU/Linux users looking for more control over their PCs and for those that are comfortable using the RPM system. For me, the Debian system is more familiar and I like using APT.

    Highly recommended!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    12,944

    Re: OpenSUSE 64 bit

    You seemed to have recommended so many distros then deleted them.
    This account is not active.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Nutley, NJ
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    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: OpenSUSE 64 bit

    I did not install OpenSUSE 64 bit. I just booted off the Live GNOME CD. The same is true for PC-BSD 9.1 RC2.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    140

    Re: OpenSUSE 64 bit

    I would still consider opensuse for newbies mainly because it won't feel alien to former windows users and can pick it uip quite quickly. I have no experience with yast so I am not reliable when it comes to it but yast really shines when it's used for a server environment.

    Sadly if the user is after control they're better off with a distro like Arch or Gentoo.
    I would probably recommend cinnarch ones some of the kinks are worked out as it does look promising.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    United States
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    2,090
    Distro
    Kubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot

    Re: OpenSUSE 64 bit

    This is a case of preference!

    What if someone had more than one preference?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Nutley, NJ
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    551
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: OpenSUSE 64 bit

    After testing the OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit Live GNOME CD-R, I decided to get rid of Ubuntu 12.10 64 bit Release Candidate and I installed OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit bare metal on my System76 Lemur Ultra (lemu4). So far, almost everything works except for the SD Card slot. I am still learning how to add my Canon Pixma MX870 printer using the Internet Printing Protocol on my 802.11 G Wi-Fi private network, but everything else pretty much works right out of the box with no problems. GNOME 3.4.2.1 and GNOME Shell 3.4.2 do have a known bug with the screen saver lock function: entering the user's credentials does not unlock the screen saver and return the user back to his desktop. I disabled the locking screen saver function and I set it to automatically dim and eventually blank my screen after 5 minutes which is fine.

    YaST is pretty thorough and it is a bit daunting for new OpenSUSE users because there are so many buttons and settings to wade through. It is certainly one of the most comprehensive systems administration tools that I have encountered in GNU/Linux. It will take me some time to learn how to use it properly.

    OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit ships with Linux kernel 3.4.11-2.16-desktop. I find this to be better than Ubuntu 12.04.1 64 bit LTS that ships with Linux kernel 3.2.0-31 generic because this older version locks up my System76 Lemur Ultra (lemu4) notebook PC randomly especially when more than half a dozen software applications are currently running. I found that upgrading to Linux kernel 3.3.6-030306 solved this problem, but I was no longer receiving any more updates to the Linux kernel by using this workaround solution so I was not impressed with this partial fix. Upgrading to Ubuntu 12.10 64 bit means that Linux kernel 3.5.0 shipped with it and kernel.org indicates that the Linux kernel 3.5.y is only expected to receive one more minor update and it will reach end of life status pretty soon. This was another bugaboo that presented an unacceptable solution to me.

    OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit was released on September 5th, 2012. It is not a cutting edge GNU/Linux distribution. It includes modern software packages and their respective versions, but it focuses on stability and a smooth user experience rather than including cutting or bleeding edge software. This was one of the problems that I experienced with Ubuntu 12.10 64 bit Release Candidate. It was a cutting edge distribution in which software randomly crashed frequently. The same is true with Ubuntu 12.04.1 64 bit LTS. Again, software crashed randomly. It distracted me from focusing on my digital work flow. Sometimes, crashes to Compiz meant that I had an unusable desktop environment as a result. I think that Canonical is so focused on making a profit off of Ubuntu that they are losing focus on the quality assurance and overall polish for Ubuntu in general. I also disliked the Ubuntu Unity desktop environment quite a bit. It is not highly configurable without adding PPAs and more software packages. I find it to be a rather inelegant solution that limits users' freedoms by constraining their digital work flows as that was my experience. I rarely used it at all.

    GNOME 3.4.2 and GNOME Shell 3.4.2.1 are not my favorite desktop environment versions. I find it annoying to click between the Windows and Applications buttons to juggle my digital work flow. However, it is usable for the next several months and I can learn to live with it. I find GNOME to be more stable and usable than K Desktop Environment. Fewer stuff breaks or crashes in my experience. I know that this may not be everybody's experience.

    You may be wondering why I switched from Ubuntu 12.10 64 bit Release Candidate to OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit today. Part of the reason was it was a whimsical decision to try something different. The other part is more serious. I see the future direction in which Canonical is taking their Ubuntu brand and I do not agree with some of their choices. They are trying to market Ubuntu as a brand that can compete with Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh OS X to gain more market share and users worldwide. It is quickly becoming a commercial platform to generate additional revenues and profits for Canonical. I found out that I have to add and manage private keys to install and use paid software packages. I did not like any of these changes afoot, but I kept quiet for the most part. Ubuntu is still near and dear to my heart, but they are not my first choice for GNU/Linux purists especially for intermediate to advanced users like myself that are looking for more learning opportunities and challenges. The problem with going down the paid software and apps route is that you wind up with vendor lock in. I bought the Fluendo Multimedia Codec and DVD-Video player for Ubuntu and I can not use it in OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit because I do not have access to my private key. I encountered a similar problem with PC hardware and software applications when I switched from Microsoft Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate Edition Service Pack 1 to Ubuntu GNU/Linux. I had to give away lots of expensive PC hardware that was designed for Windows 7 to my best friend and I could not easily convert my massive Apple iTunes library to FLAC format quickly enough. I learned my lessons the hard way. I am in search for a pure GNU/Linux experience that adheres closely to FLOSS.

    I may return to Ubuntu in the future. It depends on the situation. For now, I think that I will learn how to use OpenSUSE 12.2 64 bit.

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