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Thread: Terminal, how to?

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    Terminal, how to?

    I used my first computer with windows OS for about 4 1/2 years and never heard of a
    terminal, I am realizing now that with ubuntu it is an important working component
    of this system. Where would I find the info that addresses this function with it's various
    command lines?
    Thank you, as always I appreciate the help.
    Last edited by offgridguy; September 13th, 2012 at 04:31 PM. Reason: Spelling error

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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    This page (first Google hit for "Ubuntu terminal" by the way) should get you started: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UsingTheTerminal

    If you have specific questions, ask away!

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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    Quote Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
    This page (first Google hit for "Ubuntu terminal" by the way) should get you started: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UsingTheTerminal

    If you have specific questions, ask away!
    Thank you for the link, I read somewhere " the only dumb questions are the ones
    nobody asks" I won't learn if I don't ask, thanks again.

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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    steeldriver, thank you for the link.

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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    Thank you, this is probably enough to hold me for awhile.

  8. #8
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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    I'll add something anyway. If in the terminal you enter "info info", it will tell you about the built in help. "man" in front of any command will take you to it's manual page, so "man info" is worth a look. To find out about commands you don't know "apropos" is useful, it searches through all the manual pages for whatever you entered after the word, so if you knew you wanted to search but didn't know how "apropos search" would pull a list of all the maual pages which use the term 'search'. You could then use "man" to look at the candidates and work out which command you wanted and how to use it. Reading an appropriate guide is a better way of learning, however having authentic referance material which is always available, even off the internet grid, is very useful indeed.
    Last edited by houseworkshy; September 13th, 2012 at 09:20 PM.


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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    Thank you ,this looks very useful.

  10. #10
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    Re: Terminal, how to?

    Offline help is important for another reason. Just as most people prefer to get changed for swimming before rather than after diving in, it's generally a good idea to set up some security before actually going online. On a default install though a firewall is in the distribution it is not enabled.
    So to set up safe defaults use "sudo ufw default deny", because sudo enables administration powers for 15 minuets you will be asked to provide your password.
    Then "ufw enable" will enable the firewall which will run each time you start up from then on. If you enter the second command quickly it won't need "sudo" in front of it as the timer will still be running, if for some reason it takes longer than 15 minuets to enter the second command you will.
    It's a good idea to stop the timer and kill sudo early when you have finished, especially if browsing. To do that "sudo -k"
    I hope that doesn't seem deep end but I think setting the firewall up before going online matters. It's the only bit which requires command line knowledge on a fresh install, so there is it. One can install graphic managers instead but to do that one goes online.
    For more on this "man ufw", "man sudo".
    "man" is probably my most used command. Being new to the command line be cautious of "sudo", you see it all over the forums only because admin powers are often needed to install and fix things.

    I've been on this forum for a while and haven't seen one yet but there is a warning sticky about malicious commands being posted. So the habit of using "man" to understand what advice you have seen rather than simply copy and pasting it on trust is a good one to develop. It is also one of the best ways of learning.
    These links may be useful too
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CommandLineResources

    Don't let the huge amount of info daunt you, most things can be done in the gui anyway. So whilst highly useful ( and universal to all distro's ) it's not crucial, it's something you can learn at your own pace. Slightly like early Windows in a way, even though DOS sat under everything windows did, many of it's users never touched it.
    Get familiar with a few commands you are likely to use a lot and add more at your own pace. I'd start with the looking at but not doing anything commands first, can't do damage with those. Once those are under the belt you'll understand the format of the man pages, which is standardised, and be less likely to misunderstand them when you come to use the doing things commands.

    There are a lot of commands, over six hundred when last I looked, and I doubt there are many who know the lot and I don't know of a distro which has all of them. Usually people know a couple of dozen that everyone uses and a bunch of extra ones associated with whatever they do a lot, maintaining networks or researching theoretical mathematics as examples. Linux is one subject where even a little knowledge is still useful. Don't feel you have to know the lot in order to be competent.
    Have fun.
    Last edited by houseworkshy; September 14th, 2012 at 01:08 AM. Reason: paras


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