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Thread: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    32

    how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    Hello everyone

    I have my music on a different partition, so this means that Banshee Media Player can't play music from my library without me first mounting the partition. So I was thinking of writing a little script that mounts the partition, opens Banshee and remove the partition again after Banshee is closed. Here's what I've got:

    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/A220742420740199
    sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/A220742420740199
    banshee
    sudo umount /dev/sda2
    sudo rmdir /media/A220742420740199
    Now the problem is, I want to be able to run this as a normal executable. If I run it in the terminal everything works fine. But if I just run, not in the terminal (the way I want it), the partition doesn't get mounted. I guess, but am not sure, that the partition gets unmounted again immediately after Banshee is loaded. How do I get this to happen only after Banshee is closed again?

    Thanks for the help
    Cheers
    Lukas

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Beans
    6,604
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    Hi Quazze.

    autofs would be a perfect solution for this situation. Take a look at this tutorial.

    Let us know how it goes.
    Regards.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Beans
    801
    Distro
    Xubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal

    Re: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    sudo is meant for terminal only. Try gksudo instead.
    The simplest would be to invoke your script with gksudo script instead of calling gksudo four times in it.
    To execute banshee as yourself (not root) edit the line to look like this:
    Code:
    su <yourname> -c banshee
    So to wrap up:
    Code:
    # must be run as superuser
    mkdir /media/A220742420740199
    mount /dev/sda2 /media/A220742420740199
    su <yourname> -c banshee
    umount /dev/sda2
    rmdir /media/A220742420740199
    Cheers!
    Last edited by LewisTM; August 19th, 2012 at 01:02 AM.
    husband@wife$ make sandwich
    Permission denied
    husband@wife$ sudo make sandwich

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Beans
    32

    Re: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    thanks for the answers

    Quote Originally Posted by papibe View Post
    Hi Quazze.
    autofs would be a perfect solution for this situation. Take a look at this tutorial.
    From the description it indeed seems what I need, but I don't really seem to understand how it works from this tutorial...

    Quote Originally Posted by LewisTM View Post
    sudo is meant for terminal only. Try gksudo instead.
    I might misinterpret this, but I always thought gksudo was for commands running graphical processes?
    Also I still then get the problem that, as soon as Banshee is launched, it unmounts the partition immediately after


    I also have another question actually. I would want to play my music without having to give my su password. How come if I manually mount the partition I need root permission and when I mount the partition with nautilus I don't?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Beans
    801
    Distro
    Xubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal

    Re: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    gksudo exists so you can enter the password in a graphical environment. A script run outside of a terminal has not command line prompt to ask for a password so you need gksudo in this case.

    Banshee might fork itself in the background on your machine, so that subsequent commands in the script (unmount) will be executed. It doesn't do that on mine but who knows?
    To circumvent that you could pause the script and check for the presence of banshee in the running processes every 5 seconds, then resume when it's gone.
    Code:
    while pgrep banshee; do sleep 5; done
    Nautilus uses the gio/gvfs framework to mount partitions. You can use that as well. Here's a new script that might work better and without administrator password:
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    gvfs-mount -d /dev/sda2
    banshee
    while pgrep banshee; do sleep 5; done
    gvfs-mount -u /media/A220742420740199
    husband@wife$ make sandwich
    Permission denied
    husband@wife$ sudo make sandwich

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Beans
    32

    Re: how to execute commands in script after program is closed

    nice, this works perfectly

    is the
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    necessary though? Don't fully understand that....

    thanks anyway, learned a lot new too

    Cheers
    Lukas

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