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Thread: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

  1. #1051
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    The post above is something else.
    Maybe I'm mistaken but the title is "Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows" then the OP goes into modifying the Samba config files. Which isn't really necessary anymore and will likely confuse and cause more problems unless you really know what your doing.

    Recently people are asking how to set it up with newer versions. So I gave a simple little pkg that can be used to make it pretty easy and painless.

    Most of the newer versions can share from the file properties etc. But that can also get complicated. I started out sharing like that but then for managing those files it gets confusing. You have to know and remember all of your shares and their paths for management. If you just have 1 or 2. Not too big of a problem but if you have multiple and maybe longer paths. Then it gets hard to keep track of all your shares. So especially for beginners using System-Config-Samba is just simple to use and all your shares are listed in one place.
    Last edited by megamister; August 9th, 2012 at 04:09 AM.

  2. #1052
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Fair enough but this is a HowTo not a request for help. If you were to create a HowTo on using system-config-samba and I came in and said "No, a better way is to create Samba Usershares using Nautilus" I suspect you would consider that rude.

    Perhaps you should create your own Howto. If you do you might want to clean it up a bit:
    Once you get it up and running, set up a new Samba User and password from the drop down menu.
    There's 2 things wrong with that:

    [1] You can't do that from the drop down menu. You can add an existing local user to the samba password database from the drop down menu but you can't create a new user from there. You would need to create a local user on the server first and then use the drop down menu to add him to the samba password database.

    [2] You don't need to do any of that if all you are doing is creating guest accessible ( Public ) shares.
    Maybe I'm mistaken but the title is "Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows" then the OP goes into modifying the Samba config files. Which isn't really necessary anymore and will likely confuse and cause more problems unless you really know what your doing.
    This HowTo is about peer-to-peer but he is tackling a specific problem of netbios name resolution by creating a WINS server on the Linux box:
    wins support = yes
    Would I have done it that way - No. If this is a simple home lan with everyone on the same subnet is that even necessary - I would argue that it is not. But the beauty of this HowTo is that even though it is no longer maintained and even though it is now 6 years old it is still relevant and still works.

    And your description would require a user to alter smb.conf anyway because if it's a peer-to-peer setup it won't work. The remote user will save a file with owner as either "nobody" or a username with read only access to the user on the server. If you want the server user to have write access to newly added files something will have to be done. One way to do that is something suggested in the original HowTo:
    force user = YOUR_USERNAME
    Stormbringer was(is) a pretty smart fella.

    Totally unrelated side note:
    You have to know and remember all of your shares and their paths for management. If you just have 1 or 2. Not too big of a problem but if you have multiple and maybe longer paths. Then it gets hard to keep track of all your shares. So especially for beginners using System-Config-Samba is just simple to use and all your shares are listed in one place.
    Nautilus-share is patterned after a WinXP simple share. It's icon in Nautilus changes to indicate that it is shared just like in Windows. It even automatically modifies Linux permissions so that it's consistent with how you shared the folder. You can always get a complete listing of these shares by issuing:
    Code:
    net usershare info --long
    It tells you the path to the shared folder and how you are sharing it.
    Last edited by Morbius1; August 9th, 2012 at 02:04 PM.

  3. #1053
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    See this is why we have forums, to learn and discuss topics. I posted related info based on the comments of the 2 previous users before me that were presumably looking for simplified info like I posted. Otherwise they would have used the original info and applied it to their problem and likely solved it. But they didn't/couldn't so asked for help, so I tried to assist based on what asked. Maybe some would consider it thread jacking, but I think it's very closely related. We have to remember some will read these comments for many years to come. We just may answer someone's question 6 yrs later.



    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    Fair enough but this is a HowTo not a request for help. If you were to create a HowTo on using system-config-samba and I came in and said "No, a better way is to create Samba Usershares using Nautilus" I suspect you would consider that rude.
    Well apparently the OP is not around anymore, so his opinions are kinda irrelevant. But honestly if I read the 2 previous posts and then mine, it seems to fit. So no I wouldn't consider it rude. And I never once said a “better way”. If someone interprets my wording as that, then thats their opinion\interpretation. And honestly if you jumped and said that, I would likely respond, yes that is a another way. Then maybe discuss the pros and cons of either. But that's just me. I will generally just take the situation at face value. Questions were asked and someone answered with what they thought would help. Why should I think that's rude? Answer: I wouldn't.


    If this was strictly a How To and no related discussion, I don't think we would have 106 pages.




    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    Perhaps you should create your own Howto.
    Sorry I don't think I'm anywhere near that point yet.




    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    [1] You can't do that from the drop down menu. You can add an existing local user to the samba password database from the drop down menu but you can't create a new user from there. You would need to create a local user on the server first and then use the drop down menu to add him to the samba password database.
    I thought I made it pretty clear in my wording, from the drop down menu you make a new Samba User, not a Local User. From the Preferences menu you click on “Samba Users” and you get a popup that says “Create New Samba User”. Then you get a popup that gives options for selecting a Unix Username with a list of Local Users etc. A Windows Username box, Samba Password and Confirm Samba Password. So apparently I CAN, create a new Samba User just like I stated. That differentiation threw me off for a bit when I was first setting things up too. Most of the tutorials I read would just reference a "user" or say something like set up a new user if you don't have one. Well if your new to it, your gonna think oh I already have one set up when I installed(meaning a local user). Which is obviously wrong, and also why I tried to make it very clear the first thing you have to do is set up a New Samba User. But just to clarify the issue. I'm gonna slightly modify my post to say a Samba User is required.




    I did not post a comprehensive How To, with all the options, scenarios and settings listed. I listed the simple basics that would apply to people asking how do I set up Samba.


    Quote Originally Posted by GaryRixon View Post
    Thank you so much. I'm not lying when I say I have been attempting to setup a password protected samba share for about a month now.

    I don't have masses of free time, but I really enjoy administrating the servers I have setup and you have no doubt saved me many hours of tinkering.

    I simply had no idea you had to add a samba user.
    Quote Originally Posted by c2tarun View Post
    I agree, anyone who setup Samba on *buntu 12.04 can please share the tutorial. It will be helpful to all of us.




    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    And your description would require a user to alter smb.conf anyway because if it's a peer-to-peer setup it won't work. The remote user will save a file with owner as either "nobody" or a username with read only access to the user on the server. If you want the server user to have write access to newly added files something will have to be done. One way to do that is something suggested in the original HowTo:
    Stormbringer was(is) a pretty smart fella.
    That is a good note to add, that will likely help somebody. I may have a use for that option. I'm sure he was\is a smart fella. But I don't know him so I will take your word on that.





    Quote Originally Posted by Morbius1 View Post
    Totally unrelated side note:
    Nautilus-share is patterned after a WinXP simple share. It's icon in Nautilus changes to indicate that it is shared just like in Windows. It even automatically modifies Linux permissions so that it's consistent with how you shared the folder. You can always get a complete listing of these shares by issuing:
    Code:
    net usershare info --long
    It tells you the path to the shared folder and how you are sharing it.
    I'm personally aware it's very similar to XP simple share, as that's what I started sharing with. Then when I switched to Linux. I also did it that way too until I started needing more customization and found a better\efficient way of managing what I needed.

    That syntax is helpful thanks, I added it to my references. The problem is though that I think a majority of Linux users are not command line comfortable, at least the newer ones. Sure everything CAN be done from the command line as the GUI(Graphical User Interface) is only a visual way of translating to commands in a Terminal. A lot of newer users are transferring from a Windows system and are general users. But the more you begin using Linux the more you're forced to learn and get comfortable with the Terminal.

    So we need simpler visual tools to be able to do things until we gain a better understanding of how and why. Then it's much easier to go in and start editing config files. Many of the admins and veteran Linux users forget what it's like to be a newer user and trying to do simple things when you don't know all the commands, syntax, paths, and understanding of the file system. Then when your trying to research a solution you find 4 pages of command line instructions telling you how to do it. With no indication of which versions it will work with, or sometimes no indication of if or which pkgs or repositories needing to be updated first... Or... I could go on and on.

    I know I personally have read hundreds if not thousands of posts sometimes related and sometimes only slightly. But one line in a comment clicked on the light bulb and pointed me in the right direction. Such as nice big letters saying a new samba user must be created...Doh!!!

  4. #1054
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Once you get it up and running, set up a new Samba User and password(REQUIRED for Samba) from the drop down menu
    You do not create a samba user from the drop down menu. The menu is a list of all the current local users on your system. You create a local user using "User Accounts" and then add that user to the samba password database giving him a samba password.

    So there's only 2 ways you can use this utility:

    [1] Create a local user named say .. bob... that matches the client users name using User Accounts. Then use the samba utility to add his name to the database:
    Unix username = bob
    Windows username = bob

    [2] You can if you really want to mess yourself up just use the samba utility:
    UNIX Username = avahi
    in this scenario we didn't create the user bob in User Accounts so we can't select him from the drop down list.
    Windows Username = bob

    In this case 2 things will happen:
    ** A line will be added to smb.conf if it isn't there already:
    username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    ** If you actually go to that file you will see that the user "bob" has been mapped to the user avahi:
    avahi = bob
    That's a mess.

    And there is one last thing on the whole issue of samba users and passwords. If you only create guest accessible shares you don't have to do any of this.

  5. #1055
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    What the pkg is doing behind the scenes gets complicated and like you said messy. That's why I said...Create new Samba User. That's the way the it's labeled, that's what people are going to think while setting it up. Many tutorials I have read says create a samba user. You enter the username and password in the smb.conf file. Without the info there it doesn't work, and you are essentially creating an entry that wasn't there. So it can be argued that it's not created. But by adding the entry it is created. It is a requirement that the user is already a local account. But that is getting slightly off track again. Again this gets very complicated and annoyingly so especially for someone just trying to set up some simple shares. Once you start to understand what's going then you can start getting into technicalities and modifying files.

    But again to clarify for those who don't know or understand, I will add a note the Samba User is a local user acct.

    You clearly have a great understanding of how it all works, excellent you can probably answer some of my other more technical questions. But what comes easy and natural for you is very foreign and difficult for someone just trying to set something simple up. There is a good term for doing things it's KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid. I don't need to understand how my car engine actually atomizes the fuel and air to burn in combustion to drive my car to the store. Until I'm ready to dig in and learn about it.

    Which brings up another question, if I recall there is a user group "smb". So an admin could add a local user to the smb group, would that create an entry in the smb.conf? But a password would still need to be added correct?
    Last edited by megamister; August 10th, 2012 at 01:26 AM.

  6. #1056
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Once you get it up and running, set up a new Samba User and password(REQUIRED for Samba operation and must be a local user) from the drop down menu.
    ** That's closer but you never explained that he needs to create the local user first using something like "User Accounts" before using system-config-samba.

    ** Adding a Samba user is not required for Samba operation. It is only required if you create a Private share that requires authentication. If you create a Public share that allows anonymous "guest" access then one is not required.
    You enter the username and password in the smb.conf file. Without the info there it doesn't work, and you are essentially creating an entry that wasn't there.
    Smb.conf has no entries nor does it have any provisions for a user's username and password.
    But what comes easy and natural for you is very foreign and difficult for someone just trying to set something simple up. There is a good term for doing things it's KISS, Keep It Simple Stupid.
    Which is why in a more appropriate setting - like not in someone's HowTo - I always recommend the following:

    Step1: Make believe you are sitting in front of a WinXP machine
    Step2: Open the File Manager - Nautilus
    Step3: Right click on a folder you own and select "Sharing Options"

    Note: If you are not the owner of the folder then run nautilus as root: "gksu nautilus"

    It will create the samba share, adjust the Linux permissions automatically, and change the icon of the folder being shared to indicate that it is shared. It can't do everything a Classic Samba Share can do but neither can system-config-samba.
    Last edited by Morbius1; August 10th, 2012 at 04:32 PM.

  7. #1057
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Hello. I recently installed linux mint on my acer aspire one d250 and I am in urgent need to share files between the linux and a windows7 OS. I used your how-to guide to configure my samba (with slide differences for the mint part) and it seems it worked. Users and passwords created normally and no errors occured BUT, when I write down \\ip-address of the linux PC\MyFiles and write down any of the created users and passwords i get this error in the windows PC: \\ip-address\Myfiles is not accessable. You may not have the rights to use this network resource. Try contacting the server administrator to gain access.
    The group name could not be found.

    I am pretty sure I gave identical name to both the linux/win7 network groups and I never got any error while configuring the samba.
    Any ideas what might have gone wrong ?
    Thanks in advance.
    Intacto.

  8. #1058
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by Intacto View Post
    Hello. I recently installed linux mint on my acer aspire one d250 and I am in urgent need to share files between the linux and a windows7 OS. I used your how-to guide to configure my samba (with slide differences for the mint part) and it seems it worked. Users and passwords created normally and no errors occured BUT, when I write down \\ip-address of the linux PC\MyFiles and write down any of the created users and passwords i get this error in the windows PC: \\ip-address\Myfiles is not accessable. You may not have the rights to use this network resource. Try contacting the server administrator to gain access.
    The group name could not be found.

    I am pretty sure I gave identical name to both the linux/win7 network groups and I never got any error while configuring the samba.
    Any ideas what might have gone wrong ?
    Thanks in advance.
    Intacto.

    I'm not sure who your directing your question at since you don't say, but I will try to help. My guess is you have permission issues. You might try navigating with a Root level file manager to your folders\files and check your permissions. Make sure your owner, group and other permissions are set correctly for your goals. Be sure to select "Apply permissions to Enclosed Files".

    Depending on what your permissions are set as you may need to change them via Terminal. I have had cases where the changes didn't seem to take effect until I used the Terminal and Chmod or chown etc.

    Otherwise another issue with Win7 and Vista is fixed with this info I found after hours of researching. Only to find a couple simple little fixes.

    Basically, you have to add a DWORD value called LmCompatibilityLevel to:

    HKLM|System|CurrentControlSet|Control|Lsa and set the value to 2.
    LmCompatibilityLevel



    Explanation:

    HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa
    Data type
    Range
    Default value

    REG_DWORD
    0–5
    0


    Description

    Specifies the mode of authentication and session security to be used for network logons.
    Value
    Meaning

    0
    Clients use LM and NTLM authentication, but they never use NTLMv2 session security. Domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

    1
    Clients use LM and NTLM authentication, and they use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it. Domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

    2
    Clients use only NTLM authentication, and they use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it. Domain controller accepts LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

    3
    Clients use only NTLMv2 authentication, and they use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it. Domain controllers accept LM, NTLM, and NTLMv2 authentication.

    4
    Clients use only NTLMv2 authentication, and they use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it. Domain controller refuses LM authentication responses, but it accepts NTLM and NTLMv2.

    5
    Clients use only NTLMv2 authentication, and they use NTLMv2 session security if the server supports it. Domain controller refuses LM and NTLM authentication responses, but it accepts NTLMv2.
    Activation method

    You must restart Windows to make changes to this entry effective.

    Note

    To set a client running Windows NT Service Pack 4 to level 3 security or higher, the domain controllers for the user's account domains must already be upgraded to Service Pack 4.

    For more information about operating-system interoperability and session security settings , see the Microsoft Knowledge Base link on the Web Resources page. Search the Knowledge Base for Article Q147706 or for the keywords LM authentication.






    **** For inability to access password share as standard user

    to configure the EnableLinkedConnections registry value
    Click Start, type regedit in the Start programs and files box, and then press ENTER.
    Locate and then right-click the registry subkey

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Policies\System.

    Point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
    Type EnableLinkedConnections, and then press ENTER.
    Right-click EnableLinkedConnections, and then click Modify.
    In the Value data box, type 1, and then click OK.

  9. #1059
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    Re: HOWTO: Setup Samba peer-to-peer with Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by Intacto View Post
    Hello. I recently installed linux mint on my acer aspire one d250 and I am in urgent need to share files between the linux and a windows7 OS. I used your how-to guide to configure my samba (with slide differences for the mint part) and it seems it worked. Users and passwords created normally and no errors occured BUT, when I write down \\ip-address of the linux PC\MyFiles and write down any of the created users and passwords i get this error in the windows PC: \\ip-address\Myfiles is not accessable. You may not have the rights to use this network resource. Try contacting the server administrator to gain access.
    The group name could not be found.

    I am pretty sure I gave identical name to both the linux/win7 network groups and I never got any error while configuring the samba.
    Any ideas what might have gone wrong ?
    Thanks in advance.
    Intacto.
    Before you start monkeying around the the registry in Win7 I would suggest the following:

    ** Start your own thread.

    This thread is labeled "Outdated Tutorials and Tips" because the original author is no longer a member of the forum and no longer uses Ubuntu. BTW, despite it being called outdated it's still the best HowTo in this forum explaining how to set up a Linux WINS server .

    ** When you do start your own thread posting the output of the following commands will help in diagnosing your problem:

    Code:
    testparm -s
    net usershare info --long
    smbtree

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