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Thread: Your precious Solid State Drive

  1. #11
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    What's wrong with leaving the OS on the SSD and data on a mechanical hard drive?

    Also, how does SSD work with Clonezilla? If you have to restore an image made from SSD only to another SSD (as opposed to mechanical drive) that's a deal breaker for me.

  2. #12
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Homeroast View Post
    Total newbie question here ... do solid state drives run cooler than hard disk drives?
    Quote Originally Posted by steve7777777 View Post
    What's wrong with leaving the OS on the SSD and data on a mechanical hard drive?

    Also, how does SSD work with Clonezilla? If you have to restore an image made from SSD only to another SSD (as opposed to mechanical drive) that's a deal breaker for me.
    @Homeroast: Yes, SSD's run very cool. Think of them as very fast internal thumb drives, consisting of flash memory. They consist of no moving parts, so they can resist large amounts of shock as well. And, they use almost no power.

    @steve7777777: We are saying to do that, were just being a bit more technical about it. As for clonezilla, remember that to an operating system the data on an SSD is no different to the data on a mechanical drive. Same files, same filesystems. So clonezilla will happily work in that situation.

  3. #13
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    Question Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheesemill View Post
    I have / and /home on my 64GB SSD, swap and /data on my 1TB HD (with swappiness set to 0 as I have 8GB RAM).

    Videos, Music, Pictures etc are symlinks to folders on my /data partition.

    This way I still get the speed advantage of an SSD for all of my configuration files that live in /home.
    If /home was on my HD then applications would have to read files from the HD when starting up, so I wouldn't get the same performance boost that I do with my setup.

    To decrease writes to my SSD I enable the noatime option in fstab as well as turning off the ext4 journaling (I use a UPS). Also make sure you use the discard option to enable TRIM support.

    Also /tmp is mounted as a RAM disk.
    When you installed Ubuntu, what size did you allocate to the swap partition? Or did you not create a swap partition, since you have so much RAM?

    You have a 1TB HDD. That is nice During installation, you configured a partition /Data, is that right? I have tried something like that before, but I wasn't able to write to it, (or even read it!) as far as I can remember. What settings did you need to set? What file system did you use for /Data, by the way? And what sort of things would you store on /Data rather than in /home?
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  4. #14
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    i think a good guide is
    http://www.howtogeek.com/62761/how-t...r-performance/

    in general, i don't think one needs to worry too much about writing to SSD these days. sure it "wears the drive out", but it'll take much longer then the time an even high wear computer user will keep the drive.
    http://www.storagesearch.com/ssdmyths-endurance.html
    I have a first generation Intel 80GB SSD that is still going very strong in my mother's laptop without ever having undergone much optimization. if and when it fails it will be the first one of a dozen or so SSDs i have had running in a number of machines.

    in summary, the basic rule seems to be:
    * include noatime in your fstab (12.04 does this all by itself with SSDs, at least it did so in my system) (I think nodiratime is enabled automatically if you set noatime, but some do both) to avoid the silly UNIX design idea to constantly update file access times...
    * enable trim (discard in fstab)

    the other considerations are for additional drive space. if you collect movies and pictures, you'll prolly want to move your videos and picture folders there.

  5. #15
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by steve7777777 View Post
    What's wrong with leaving the OS on the SSD and data on a mechanical hard drive?
    Nothing, it's a good way to do it.

    If you've got enough RAM I'd suggest instead of putting /var and /tmp on a hard drive, stick it into a ramdisk. You'll lower writes to your SSD and it'll be even quicker.

    I don't bother with noatime for SSDs, relatime is good enough and is the default these days. TRIM is important, definitely enable that. I wouldn't advise using a non-journaling filesystem unless you have a rock-solid system for protecting your data. Just use EXT4 and don't worry about it.

    The new hybrid drives are also interesting, as they give some of the benefits of SSD technology at a price per GB that is useful for storage.

  6. #16
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Paqman View Post
    Nothing, it's a good way to do it.

    If you've got enough RAM I'd suggest instead of putting /var and /tmp on a hard drive, stick it into a ramdisk. You'll lower writes to your SSD and it'll be even quicker.

    I don't bother with noatime for SSDs, relatime is good enough and is the default these days. TRIM is important, definitely enable that. I wouldn't advise using a non-journaling filesystem unless you have a rock-solid system for protecting your data. Just use EXT4 and don't worry about it.

    The new hybrid drives are also interesting, as they give some of the benefits of SSD technology at a price per GB that is useful for storage.
    Thanks Jagoly and Paqman. Great information!

  7. #17
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    I followed some recommendation by the Gentoo howto and got the following:

    / -> goes on the SSD
    /var, /tmp -> go on RAM disk
    /home -> mechanical 1
    /media/Storage -> mechanical 2

  8. #18
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    Smile Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Thank you for the great suggestions, people!

    There is some nice information about configuring your SSD here and here. It seems to be quite up to date, too.
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  9. #19
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    Question Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Paqman View Post

    If you've got enough RAM I'd suggest instead of putting /var and /tmp on a hard drive, stick it into a ramdisk. You'll lower writes to your SSD and it'll be even quicker.

    I don't bother with noatime for SSDs, relatime is good enough and is the default these days. TRIM is important, definitely enable that. I wouldn't advise using a non-journaling filesystem unless you have a rock-solid system for protecting your data. Just use EXT4 and don't worry about it.

    The new hybrid drives are also interesting, as they give some of the benefits of SSD technology at a price per GB that is useful for storage.

    How do we put /var and /tmp into a ramdisk? Do we do that during installation? On a system with 16 GB of RAM, how large should the /var and /tmp ramdisks be?

    BTW, during installation, should any of the partitions be ext 2? Why use that instead of ext4?

    Thank you!
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    Trisquel a fully free GNU/Linux-libre distribution
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  10. #20
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by yeehi View Post
    How do we put /var and /tmp into a ramdisk? Do we do that during installation? On a system with 16 GB of RAM, how large should the /var and /tmp ramdisks be?
    To mount a part of the filesystem to a ramdisk add a line to /etc/fstab by hitting Alt-F2 and typing:
    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
    Add a line such as:
    Code:
    none    /tmp    tmpfs    defaults    0    0
    You can specify a size if you want by adding an option such as "size=512m" instead of "defaults".

    Reboot and in a terminal do:
    Code:
    df -h
    You should see your ramdisk(s) listed.

    BTW, during installation, should any of the partitions be ext 2? Why use that instead of ext4?
    There's no good reason to use EXT2 IMO. People used to use it on early SSDs that lacked good wear levelling, as it would reduce disk writes, but it's superfluous these days. EXT4 has better features than EXT2, so use that.

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