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Thread: Moving things around

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    15

    Moving things around

    So I bought an ubuntu beginner's guide for my kindle, and have read up on it. It's great for working with command line and showed me things I never would've considered existing on an OS.

    I remember intimately the chapter on creating, moving, and deleting directories. In Windows I know if a directory has program files in it, do not move it because then the registry can't find the files (a reason why you don't try to copy game files off a disc straight into the program files without an installer). More than likely this is the case for ubuntu, but I really must ask what all can I move around in my filesystem while not screwing things up because I really find my directories to be an unorganized, cluttered mess with no sense of a logical path. For example, I expect a program to be in the applications folder, but instead it's in a lib. I try to figure out a pattern but I'm just so lost in my directories.

    I would appreciate some insight into what I can touch and move around, and what I should keep my hands off of. thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    7,749

    Re: Moving things around

    touch: your /home folder
    don't touch: anything not in your /home folder

    That's my advice.

    ps In Ubuntu you don't execute programs by navigating to /usr or /lib; simply tap the Super/Windows key and type what you want to do.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    92

    Re: Moving things around

    Agreed, only touch things in home if you are a beginner. Create your directories off home too. It would do you well to read up on /etc /bin /usr /var to name a few to get a general understanding.

    I personally have left Unix/Linux for a while and am now back working with it as an os. Sorry I ever left it to be honest. Having to re-learn everything.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    15

    Re: Moving things around

    Simple enough. Thanks. I've only read a quarter of this book on my kindle, so I might run up on etc, bin, usr, and var. Maybe after one read-through it'll all make sense lol.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bombay
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    6,077
    Distro
    Lubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

    Re: Moving things around

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Saget View Post
    Simple enough. Thanks. I've only read a quarter of this book on my kindle, so I might run up on etc, bin, usr, and var. Maybe after one read-through it'll all make sense lol.
    As the others have said, read whatever you like but stay at home

    Leave etc, bin, usr, and var for later, much later!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Mystletainn Kick!
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    4,481
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Moving things around

    I tend not to move folders and files I do not have permission or ownership of. I also tend to think of the hidden folders and files in the home directory as equally off-limits. As, even though they are user-owned, most of them are configuration files, and set as they are for a reason.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    LOCATION=/dev/random
    Beans
    5,767
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Moving things around

    A bit of light reading for you to help you understand the Linux filesystem:

    http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/09/...tem-structure/
    http://www.tuxradar.com/content/take...ilesystem-tour
    http://www.pathname.com/fhs/pub/fhs-2.3.html

    As mentioned above unless you know exactly what you are doing then you should only make changes to files and folders in your home directory.
    Cheesemill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Beans
    1,453
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Moving things around

    There's no Registry in Linux.

    That said, Linux uses a variety of environmental variables (info read at system startup and stored in memory) to tell it how to find the programs and files you want to run. Change either those variables or the file systems without knowing what you are doing and something will, sooner or later, go wrong. Not that you have a reason to do that.

    Your Home directory is yours to do with as you please. The rest of it belongs to the system.

    Programs often consist of more than one file, and typically are supported by code contained in library file in the "lib" directories.

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