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Thread: Partitions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Partitions

    Hey Guys

    I just bought a SSD. I also have a HD, and I'd like to install Windows 7 on the SSD, and partition the HD into two parts (200GB/300GB). On the 200GB part, I'd like to isntall Ubuntu.

    I was wondering whether it'd be possible to make the third partition (the 300GB on the HD) available to both OS's?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Lubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Partitions

    Yes, it is. Just format any partition you want to share as NTFS.
    Do not expect to install any Linux programs on this partition - it doesn't have the same file permissions that Linux uses.

    Might I recommend a smaller Linux partition for the OS/App say 10 or 20GB (ext4), then a 10GB partition for your HOME (ext4), 1-2G for swap, and then a data-only partition (NTFS) with the rest of the storage? You probably want to make all of these be logical partitions, not primary. You'll thank me later.

    Having your HOME partition separate will make OS upgrades easier since files your home won't be touched.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Thanks

    Thank you for your help.

    I understand why you separate the OS from the HOME, but why do you suggest an ext4 partition for my HOME and another one for data? In other words: would it be a very bad idea to make to HOME partition NTFS and big to use it for data storage, accesible by both OS's?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Partitions

    I am not sure linux would accept a ntfs /home partition.
    Plus, you don't want windows touching your /home partition.

    Go with separate ext4 /home, and ntfs data partition. Both ideas are great.
    Darko.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64bit & Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit

  5. #5
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    Apr 2011
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    Thanks

    Thanks to you too, Darkod.

    Okay, so I understand that now. The next step will be the execution =)

    I haven't yet recieved the SSD yet, but I'm guessing it is relatively straightforward to install it?
    1. Install the SSD on it's 2.5' to 3.5' mount.
    2. Open PC, connect SATA, connect power.
    3. Close PC

    That's it?

    Or is there anything else I need to consider?

    Given I'm able to install the SSD and boot up my PC, will it just go into the Windows (7 64-bit) I have on the HD?
    And if so, do I just install Win7 on the SSD and end up with 2 windows 7 versions?
    And if so again, what would be the smart way to transfer the (quite big amount of) data on the HD that I want to my NAS, so that I can then format my HD and repartition it?
    Furthermore, I have currently installed my Ubuntu under wubi, should I leave it as such and install wubi again on the win 7 of the SSD (I'd prefer any other way, since I don't really like the 32GB restriction...)? Or is there another way?

    Now that's a lot of questions^^ I'm sorry if they seem very basic to you, but this is the first HD/SSD I install myself^^
    I'm alright with software, but a true beginner in terms of hardware^^
    Last edited by Fightback; February 13th, 2012 at 11:25 PM. Reason: Spelling mistakes =)

  6. #6
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    Re: Partitions

    The physical install of the SSD is how you described it. Nothing more to consider.

    But for the win7 install, I would recommend to disconnect the hdd with win7 (one cable is enough, the sata or power cable).
    If you try to install on the ssd and you have the hdd with win7 present, it will add the boot files to the first install. Then when you format the hdd your new win7 won't boot.

    Disconnect it, and let it install like you only have the ssd.

    After that, you can connect the hdd but in BIOS make the ssd first choice to boot, so it will boot your new win7. Copy what ever you want, where ever you want it.

    After that you can reformat the hdd and do what ever you like with it.

    About the ubuntu install. What we discussed about separate /home, and ntfs data partition, is usually used in proper dual boot install. Not with wubi. And wubi is not meant to be a long term install anyway. Updates can easily break it.

    I recommend installing the dual boot, not wubi. For this, either plan to leave small part of the ssd for ubuntu, or after you finish copying the data from the hdd install ubuntu on it on a small partition, and use the rest as ntfs data partition.
    Darko.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64bit & Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit

  7. #7
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    Re: Partitions

    +1 to everything above.

    one more thing though, make sure AHCI is enabled in the BIOS if not already or done by default.
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  8. #8
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    Apr 2011
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    Re: Partitions

    Thanks guys.

    @haqking I shall.

    @darkod
    Alright then, I think I have understood everything =).

    I'm not sure yet whether I want to install Ubuntu on the SSD or on the HDD... What would you do?

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Re: Partitions

    I would install on the SSD. You never mentioned its capacity, and how much you need for win7 + programs. If you can spare at least 10GB on the SSD, you can install with a 10GB root partition on the SSD, 10-20GB /home partition on the HDD, and swap on the HDD too.

    If you keep all your big files on the shared data partition, you don't need much for ubuntu, both the root and /home partitions can be small.

    The final choice is up to you. Even if you decide to put ubuntu on the HDD it will work good.
    Darko.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64bit & Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Re: Partitions

    The SSD is 128 GB (that's definitively enough, right?)

    I think Win7 + programs will be about 60GB (tops), so enough space for Ubuntu.

    Probably going to install it on the SSD.

    So the basic procedure will be as follows:
    1. Install the SSD (in terms of hardware)
    2. Partition the SSD (90GB Windows; 38GB Ubuntu (or so)). Which program would you recommend? GParted on the Ubuntu-Live-CD?
    3. Install Windows on the SSD Windows Partition
    4. Backup Windows files I want to the NAS
    5. Wipe HDD. What program is suitable? (On purpose not backing up Ubuntu, there really isn't much on there I still want)
    6. Partition HDD (20GB /home, 2GB Swap, 478GB Storage) (There was something about LPARs, how would I achieve that?)
    7. Copy files back to HD
    8. Tweaking libraries etc (suggested here)
    9. Install Ubuntu (via Live-CD)

    Done.

    I've been skimming through that guide I linked above, when I stumbled across this quote, which made me wonder whether I need a separate Swap partition? I have 8GB of RAM and I'm not often running multiple VMs parallely, so I though I maybe could follow this advise:
    Adding swap to Ubuntu

    "Swap" memory is a section of the hard drive that your system's memory spills over into when it gets full and busy. Until recently, I'd been creating a whole separate partition for it. Recently, though, I've found that swap isn't always necessary on systems with a large amount of memory, and that swap can simply be a file tucked away on your hard drive somewhere.

    Follow the Ubuntu help wiki's instructions for adding more swap, but consider changing the location they suggest putting the swap file—/mnt/swap/ for the place your Storage is held—/media/Storage, in my case.
    Thanks for your help and fast replies =)
    Last edited by Fightback; February 14th, 2012 at 01:25 AM.

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