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Thread: Noob with four swaps seeks partitioning scheme feng shui.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Beans
    4

    Noob with four swaps seeks partitioning scheme feng shui.

    It would appear I've accrued a few extra swap partitions over my (re)installation lifetime:

    Code:
    z@ch:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for z: 
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x514e6243
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *          63   292968812   146484375    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2       359950334   625137344   132593505+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5       613827648   625137344     5654848+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda6       603430912   613826559     5197824   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda7       599502848   603416575     1956864   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda8       359950336   595572735   117811200   83  Linux
    /dev/sda9       595574784   599496703     1960960   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Partition table entries are not in disk order
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 4009 MB, 4009754624 bytes
    124 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1018 cylinders, total 7831552 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0005969d
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1   *          62     7826383     3913161    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
    I'm pretty sure I didn't create these manually, so I guess they were made when I used the Ubuntu installer to install over my current Ubuntu on the disk. I don't know if this is a bug, or just my ignorance. Probably the latter.

    As you can see, I have Windows, my Ubuntu, and a bunch of swaps. I only became aware of my mess because I wanted to triple-boot, adding the 12.04 alpha. Obviously, there's no click and go button for setting up triple-boots in the installer, so I had to look at the manual option. I'm just doing this for fun/out of curiosity, and I don't have any important data to lose. So I don't mind booting in to the 11.10 installer again, deleting all the swaps, the ext4, and installing clean. I do, however, want to learn a good partitioning scheme so I can have Win7, 11.10, and 12.04 alpha. Can I have a shared partition in there too, so I can access/save files from any OS? BTW, my Windows partition is 150gb, but I wouldn't mind shrinking it. While I wait, I'll boot in to that and see what space I have.

    Thanks in advance for any guidance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Beans
    6,543
    Distro
    Ubuntu 13.04 Raring Ringtail

    Re: Noob with four swaps seeks partitioning scheme feng shui.

    Quote Originally Posted by /z@ch View Post
    I don't mind booting in to the 11.10 installer again, deleting all the swaps, the ext4, and installing clean.
    No need for that. Boot up into your LiveCD or USB and run Gparted, which is the same partition editor the installer uses. Then right click on any/all of your swaps that have a little key symbol on them and "swapoff". Then you can go ahead and delete all but one of them and give the space to your other partitions.

    Once you're booted back into Linux you can edit the file /etc/fstab to remove any reference to swap partitions you no longer have. To edit that file:
    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
    Leaving those entries in won't cause any b0rkage, but it's tidier to get rid of them.

    Can I have a shared partition in there too, so I can access/save files from any OS?
    Yes, the best filesystem for this would be NTFS, as both Linux and Windows play nicely with NTFS.

    Some people also keep /home on a separate partition. Doing so can make reinstalling simpler, although it's less crucial than it used to be. Different Linux installs can share a /home partition, just as long as you use different user accounts on each system.
    Last edited by Paqman; January 8th, 2012 at 04:05 PM.

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