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Thread: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

  1. #31
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    I suggest a separate /home for new users so data is separate and new clean installs is a bit easier. It is just a start on separating data from system. But then a more advanced configuration is to have separate data partition(s). You do have to understand partitioning and mounting a data partition. Then also linking or bind to show data folders in /home. Whether /home is another partition or not then is less important. My /home is so small as I aggressively move all data including some of the hidden folders to my data partition that I keep it in my / (root). Others may have different opinions.
    Is the /home where applications are installed? I don't think so just wondering. Also, if you have this home partition and then say re-install ubuntu and you designate this partition as /home, will the installation over write the partition and start new or leave it as is but link to it as the /home in the system?

  2. #32
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    If you have installed a lot of apps you should export a list with dpkg or synaptic.

    The /home has all your apps settings as well as your data unless you have moved it elsewhere. New install, if you do not reformat, will then reuse all the old settings. New apps my update some settings for a new version, so you cannot always try to reinstall or reuse a newer /home in an older version. Backups then are still important.
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







  3. #33
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    ok so what I gather from what you said is that when reinstalling, it's fine to direct the OS to your /home partition but obviously backup in case anything goes wrong.

    This sounds like a good idea, I might try it out in April, but I do like completely sharing the DATA partition between both OS's. Can you think of anything that could go wrong with that set up?

  4. #34
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    I just install a new / (root) since I have room on my drive. I only copy some settings from /home from my old install to my new and can still boot into my old install in case I miss something. My new 60GB SSD have two 30GB partitions, so I can alternate installs. And I still have /mnt/data & /mnt/shared on my rotating drives.

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/rsync
    Oldfred's list of stuff to backup May 2011:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1748541
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







  5. #35
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows



    Given this image of a partitioning scheme (thanks Blueyak!) and wanting to have 2 Linux distros next to Windows all on one HDD I could do the following, no?

    sda1 Primary NTSF 100MB System Reserved (Windows 7 needs this)
    sda2 Primary NTSF 80GB Windows OS

    sda3 EXTENDED "theoretical"

    sda4 LOGICAL NTSF DATA for Windows and both Linux distros

    sda5 LOGICAL EXT4 ROOT of first Linux distro
    sda6 LOGICAL EXT4 HOME of first Linux distro
    sda7 LOGICAL LINUX-SWAP of first Linux distro

    sda8 LOGICAL EXT4 ROOT of second Linux distro
    sda9 LOGICAL EXT4 HOME of second Linux distro
    sda10 LOGICAL LINUX-SWAP of second Linux distro

    For now I won't care for the SWAP to be either at the end or the beginning of the HDD. I just really want to get going with this and think it can be done like that.

    Please do correct me if this is wrong, since I would not really like to resize/change the partitioning once I have them filled with data or the installations.

    I have read through this thread many times now and would hope for a green light with the above lined out scheme. What do you think?

    Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by ubni; June 4th, 2012 at 02:59 AM.

  6. #36
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    sda1 Primary NTSF 100MB System Reserved (Windows 7 needs this)
    sda2 Primary NTSF 80GB Windows OS

    sda3 EXTENDED "theoretical"

    sda4 LOGICAL NTSF DATA for Windows and both Linux distros

    sda5 LOGICAL EXT4 ROOT of first Linux distro
    sda6 LOGICAL EXT4 HOME of first Linux distro
    sda7 LOGICAL LINUX-SWAP of first Linux distro

    sda8 LOGICAL EXT4 ROOT of second Linux distro
    sda9 LOGICAL EXT4 HOME of second Linux distro
    sda10 LOGICAL LINUX-SWAP of second Linux dissda1
    You are getting very close.

    You do not need more than one swap partition. You can have ten different Linux versions installed and they will all use the same swap.

    Your numbering scheme is slightly off. You will not have an sda4 if sda3 is your extended partition. As has been mentioned previously, logical partition numbers always begin with sdX5. So what you are showing as sda4 will actually be sda5, sda5 will be sda6, and so forth.
    Last edited by Miljet; June 4th, 2012 at 05:10 AM.
    Break it, fix it, learn something.
    People who never make mistakes seldom make anything!

  7. #37
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    Wicked!! Thanks for your reply!!

    Yes once I hit Apply in GParted I saw that my numbering is a bit off.

    I can still change the partitions and double the amount of Swap towards the end of the HDD or add more space to the HOME partitions.

    To confirm about space:
    I gave HOME and ROOT each 10GB and SWAP 4GB.

    However SWAP will now either be 8GB total merging the two SWAP partitions or spreading the other 4GB to each HOME1&2 and ROOT1&2. I tend to simply double the SWAP partition and leave 10GB for each HOME1&2 and ROOT1&2 instead of giving 1GB more to each of those. So 10GB should be enough for ROOT, HOME and 8 GB for SWAP, right?

    To confirm about GRUB2:
    GRUB2 is (or will be once installed) located in the first 63 sectors of the disk sorting the booting of the various OS out, so I won't need a partition for it, right?

    GParted Screenshot:
    Last not least, GParted saved a screenshot of the HDD once I did the partitioning to Home/User/.. how can I access that Dir from Windows? Would love to upload my GParted screenshot here as well or will this only be available once I have installed the Linux distros?

  8. #38
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    If you are only giving 10GB each to / & /home I would not make them separate. Most of your data should be in the shared NTFS data partition so all systems can see it. And you will have some unused space in both / & /home so sharing the unused will work better as you will not be sure which may fill up first.

    You cannot access info stored in LInux partitions from Windows. There were some drivers but I would not use them. Just save data to the NTFS shared partition.

    You actually do not want to use swap as it is 10+ times slower than RAM. So if you have a fair amount of RAM you may never use it, but If you load a lot of programs and only have 1 or 2GB RAM then you may occasionally use swap, but will notice system slowing down.
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







  9. #39
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    If you are only giving 10GB each to / & /home I would not make them separate. Most of your data should be in the shared NTFS data partition so all systems can see it. And you will have some unused space in both / & /home so sharing the unused will work better as you will not be sure which may fill up first.
    Thank you for your reply. When you say data in the context above you surly mean personal data, photos, videos, documents but not applications (install files), application settings, configuration files, user setting files etc right?

    I am asking since I clearly want to separate the system files in / and /home from the user data (word documents, photos, videos etc), so having / and /home together in one 20GB partition would still work? How can I then separate the Linux user settings from the Linux distro install if they are not on two separate partitions?

    I thought the / is for the pure install and the Linux user settings are kept in the /home, so when I want to re-install a dirsto I can simply copy my settings back over from /home to / no? This is why I wanted to have separate / and /home partitions and this is also what people in this thread have been saying so far, no?

    This leads me to this reply from you:
    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    If planning multiple / (root) partitions for multiple installs it may be better to keep /home inside the root partition and just have one data partition. Then the data is easily shared if distributions are in the same family (all Debian) or are configured with UID & GIDs at are the 1000 as Ubuntu uses.
    What data do you mean when you refer to data in this above quote please? Is this the user settings, installation, configuration files for the distro? I think again here you mean personal data like documents, photos and video rather then Linux distro specific user setting files, right? So is it still a good idea to keep the user setting files and the Linux install OS files in one partition? What if I want to re-install that distro but don't want to loose the user settings for the distro? They will be gone if I install over it, this is really the reason I thought having / and /home on separate partitions give me the advantage of not loosing my settings. Note I am not speaking about personal data, documents, photos and video files here, all those will be share between the Linux distros and the Windows OS on the huge Logical NTFS partition. That is also the partition that makes up the biggest space on the HDD so far.

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    You cannot access info stored in LInux partitions from Windows. There were some drivers but I would not use them. Just save data to the NTFS shared partition.
    How do I tell GParted run from a live CD to save it to another partition than /home/user? I think it does that automatically somehow. Where could I change the setting for that please?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    You actually do not want to use swap as it is 10+ times slower than RAM. So if you have a fair amount of RAM you may never use it, but If you load a lot of programs and only have 1 or 2GB RAM then you may occasionally use swap, but will notice system slowing down.
    Since I have 8GB RAM I will ditch the SWAP altogether then. Thanks for letting me know about all this!!

    Again from your very informative reply new questions arose, I hope with your help I can clear those last few bits and start installing the Linux distros soon.

    Thank you.

  10. #40
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    Re: Partitioning laptop for Linux and Windows

    Data is the Documents, Video, Photos etc that are not Ubuntu settings. I also include some larger application data that may include some settings like Firefox profile, Thunderbird profile and a few other data files that applications put in . (hidden) files or folders.

    Then my /home really only has the user setting (primarily Ubuntu) for running the system and is very small, easily backed up. I usually do not copy much of those settings to my new install but do copy some of the application settings that did not have enough data to copy into my data partitions.

    I have serveal Ubuntu installs all in about 25GB with about 7GB used including /home. My /home is larger as it is over 1GB with .wine which I understand is a bit more difficult to move, so I have not moved it.

    Some have not swap and system works. Some have said a bit of swap speeds booting slightly as it looks for swap and has to timeout on not finding it. Some just create swap as a file inside /.

    My / include /home. My shared is my NTFS that I used to use a lot with XP and still has Firefox & Thunderbird profiles & all photos for Picasa. All new data goes into my /mnt/data and all folders from /mnt/data are linked into /home.

    Code:
    fred@fred-Precise:~$ df -h
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sde3        28G  7.6G   19G  29% /
    udev            2.0G  4.0K  2.0G   1% /dev
    tmpfs           791M 1016K  790M   1% /run
    none            5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
    none            2.0G  124K  2.0G   1% /run/shm
    /dev/sda1        55G   36G   20G  64% /mnt/cdrive
    /dev/sdd2       100G   28G   72G  29% /mnt/shared
    /dev/sdd6        97G   41G   51G  45% /mnt/data
    These are the folders I have in /mnt/data

    fred@fred-Precise:/mnt/data$ ls
    Calibre Library gnu ISO lost+found Pictures workspace
    Documents google-earth itrade Music Projects
    Downloads grampsdb jstock PDF spyderdata
    eclipsetrader icarra2 kmymoney PicasaDocuments Videos

    And all are linked to my /home with one command. I do have to delete the one's with the same name like Video or Document first. I do that as soon as I install so I know the folders are empty.
    for i in `echo /mnt/data/*`;do ln -s $i; done


    Splitting home directory discussion:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1811198
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1901437
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.p...hlight=%2Fdata
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







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