Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Frameworks alike OSX

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Beans
    271

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    IIRC Apple takes open source to create closed source incompatibilites? Why not give back like for ex. the frameworks crap that is complicating cross platform dev.
    Yea that's why i only have osx86...

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NorCal
    Beans
    1,149
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by ahso4271 View Post
    IIRC Apple takes open source to create closed source incompatibilites? Why not give back like for ex. the frameworks crap that is complicating cross platform dev.
    Yea that's why i only have osx86...
    Frameworks are part of the Objective-C language, Apple had nothing to do with them. They're the equivalent of C libraries.
    Posting code? Use the [code] or [php] tags.
    I don't care, I'm still free. You can't take the sky from me.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    (X,Y,Z) = (0,0,0)
    Beans
    3,715

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by schauerlich View Post
    Apple has 3 compilers available: gcc, llvm-gcc, and clang. gcc is the compiler Apple originally used, forked from 4.2 and customized for all of Apple's extensions to C/ObjC. llvm-gcc uses Apple's fork of gcc as a front end, with llvm doing the actual code generation. clang is a whole new front end based on llvm, with the goal of being more or less a drop in replacement for gcc. Currently, OS X defaults to llvm-gcc because clang's C++/ObjC++ support isn't quite production ready yet.
    Oh thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by ahso4271 View Post
    IIRC Apple takes open source to create closed source incompatibilites?
    Not necessarily. The compiler might still be open source; the issue is that nobody seems to be porting those additions back to the GNU ObjC compiler (mainly because almost nobody uses it).

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Beans
    271

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by schauerlich View Post
    Frameworks are part of the Objective-C language, Apple had nothing to do with them. They're the equivalent of C libraries.
    I'll try to compile this c* on osx86 today. if it works the're different from standard Unix libs, as on Linux i get tons of missing headers and/or multiple declarations.

    @nvteighen: surely a huge lot of very complicated work...so again why not give it back Apple, instead to pile up billions.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    (X,Y,Z) = (0,0,0)
    Beans
    3,715

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by ahso4271 View Post
    @nvteighen: surely a huge lot of very complicated work...so again why not give it back Apple, instead to pile up billions.
    Why would Apple give it back, if they can pile up billions?

    Yes, this world sucks.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Beans
    347
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    [strikethrough]What about Clang/LLVM? Doesn't Apple fund/support it? Pretty sure it supports the latest standard of ObjectiveC but I seem to recall reading somewhere it has poor support of ObjectiveC++...[/strikethrough] - Missed the previous comment on this subject! Oops!

    I just started noodling around with Clang last night. Didn't get much farther than compiling a trivial Hello World program due to time. Interestingly, I noticed the binary from Clang was smaller than the one built by GCC 4.6. I haven't had a chance to figure out why.
    Last edited by JupiterV2; August 31st, 2011 at 03:33 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NorCal
    Beans
    1,149
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by JupiterV2 View Post
    I just started noodling around with Clang last night. Didn't get much farther than compiling a trivial Hello World program due to time. Interestingly, I noticed the binary from Clang was smaller than the one built by GCC 4.6. I haven't had a chance to figure out why.
    Here's some benchmarks and other information if you decide to continue your investigation.
    Posting code? Use the [code] or [php] tags.
    I don't care, I'm still free. You can't take the sky from me.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Beans
    347
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Thanks Schauerlich. As a matter of fact, I had already viewed both pages already but I really appreciate the links. Faster compilation means far less to me than execution speed when it comes to my system libraries but for most user-level applications the speed of compilation may outweigh the loss of speed, depending on the overall effect. It will be interesting to see how Clang evolves as it continues to mature. I'm a little leery of Apple's involvement but as long as it remains with the BSD license I'd continue to use it.

    I plan to do more testing with it. If anyone would like, I'd be happy to share my experience..

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Beans
    1,534

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by ahso4271 View Post
    Gnustep seems very promising for future cross platform development, but for now I only do a x-plane plugin without gui.
    Yeah, this sure looks like the GUI of the future to me!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    (X,Y,Z) = (0,0,0)
    Beans
    3,715

    Re: Frameworks alike OSX

    Quote Originally Posted by Simian Man View Post
    Yeah, this sure looks like the GUI of the future to me!
    Don't hit GNUStep that hard: it's unfair. The GNUStep desktop was created long ago as a reimplementation of the NeXTSTEP Desktop and they've done that quite well. OK, it's true that nobody uses NeXTSTEP anymore and you might think that it's nonsense to keep this project going on. The problem is that the NeXTSTEP Desktop and all its APIs are more or less the same thing, so you end up having to do it in order to get a usable OpenStep complying framework for Objective-C. True, this shows poor design by NeXT (i.e. Steve Jobs), but the guys at the FSF can't do anything about it.

    A long-term solution would be to create an Objective-C Core Library that is completely decoupled from the OpenStep standard and messy madness. I remember participating in such an attempt, but we were so naïve thinking that we could actually produce such a thing

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •