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Thread: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    a puddle in Manchester
    Beans
    9,206
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Thanks for that clarification.
    I am uneasy about dealing with GPT, as I have never used it
    MacBook Pro 10,1 retina

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Beans
    208
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Hi guys.
    I got the black screen with the "_" problem again.
    Here is what I did:

    1. Deleted all of my previous partitions in gparted.
    2. Created an msdos partition table in gparted as suggested.
    3. created this four partitions:

    Windows - /dev/sda1, ntfs filesystem.
    Shared Partition - /dev/sda2, ext4 filesystem
    Ubuntu - /dev/sda3, ext4 filesystem
    Swap - /dev/sda4, linux-swap filesystem

    4. I ran the ubuntu installer, chose the Ubuntu partition for install (mounted as /) and chose the shared partition mounted as /home.

    5. After the install, I rebooted and again I got the black screen with "_"

    6. I tried to reinstall grub so I booted from my live-usb and did this command:

    Code:
    sudo grub-install /dev/sda
    But again this returns this error:

    Code:
    /usr/sbin/grub-probe: error: cannot stat `aufs'.
    I really don't know what to do

    If anyone is interested this is the result of the boot script:

    Code:
                    Boot Info Script 0.55    dated February 15th, 2010                    
    
    ============================= Boot Info Summary: ==============================
    
     => No boot loader is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda
     => Syslinux is installed in the MBR of /dev/sdb
    
    sda1: _________________________________________________________________________
    
        File system:       ntfs
        Boot sector type:  Windows Vista/7
        Boot sector info:  No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
        Operating System:  
        Boot files/dirs:   
    
    sda2: _________________________________________________________________________
    
        File system:       ext4
        Boot sector type:  -
        Boot sector info:  
        Operating System:  
        Boot files/dirs:   
    
    sda3: _________________________________________________________________________
    
        File system:       ext4
        Boot sector type:  -
        Boot sector info:  
        Operating System:  Ubuntu natty (development 
                           branch)
        Boot files/dirs:   /boot/grub/grub.cfg /etc/fstab
    
    sda4: _________________________________________________________________________
    
        File system:       swap
        Boot sector type:  -
        Boot sector info:  
    
    sdb1: _________________________________________________________________________
    
        File system:       vfat
        Boot sector type:  Unknown
        Boot sector info:  No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
        Operating System:  
        Boot files/dirs:   /boot/grub/grub.cfg
    
    =========================== Drive/Partition Info: =============================
    
    Drive: sda ___________________ _____________________________________________________
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    
    Partition  Boot         Start           End          Size  Id System
    
    /dev/sda1               2,048   648,022,015   648,019,968   7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda2         648,022,016 1,296,041,983   648,019,968  83 Linux
    /dev/sda3       1,296,041,984 1,944,061,951   648,019,968  83 Linux
    /dev/sda4       1,944,061,952 1,953,523,711     9,461,760  82 Linux swap / Solaris
    
    
    Drive: sdb ___________________ _____________________________________________________
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 1021 MB, 1021125120 bytes
    32 heads, 63 sectors/track, 989 cylinders, total 1994385 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    
    Partition  Boot         Start           End          Size  Id System
    
    /dev/sdb1    *            247     1,993,823     1,993,577   c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
    
    
    blkid -c /dev/null: ____________________________________________________________
    
    Device           UUID                                   TYPE       LABEL                         
    
    /dev/loop0                                              squashfs                                 
    /dev/sda1        71BDD155283AF062                       ntfs       WINDOWS                       
    /dev/sda2        12ebaa87-6931-4bb4-8dca-40c33120d6ee   ext4                                     
    /dev/sda3        169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516   ext4                                     
    /dev/sda4        9f89777c-2b39-48e1-95fb-2dab56d45cd5   swap                                     
    /dev/sda: PTTYPE="dos" 
    /dev/sdb1        180E-0D3F                              vfat       PENDRIVE                      
    /dev/sdb: PTTYPE="dos" 
    
    ============================ "mount | grep ^/dev  output: ===========================
    
    Device           Mount_Point              Type       Options
    
    aufs             /                        aufs       (rw)
    /dev/sdb1        /cdrom                   vfat       (ro,noatime,fmask=0022,dmask=0022,codepage=cp437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro)
    /dev/loop0       /rofs                    squashfs   (ro,noatime)
    
    
    =========================== sda3/boot/grub/grub.cfg: ===========================
    
    #
    # DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE
    #
    # It is automatically generated by grub-mkconfig using templates
    # from /etc/grub.d and settings from /etc/default/grub
    #
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/00_header ###
    if [ -s $prefix/grubenv ]; then
      set have_grubenv=true
      load_env
    fi
    set default="0"
    if [ "${prev_saved_entry}" ]; then
      set saved_entry="${prev_saved_entry}"
      save_env saved_entry
      set prev_saved_entry=
      save_env prev_saved_entry
      set boot_once=true
    fi
    
    function savedefault {
      if [ -z "${boot_once}" ]; then
        saved_entry="${chosen}"
        save_env saved_entry
      fi
    }
    
    function recordfail {
      set recordfail=1
      if [ -n "${have_grubenv}" ]; then if [ -z "${boot_once}" ]; then save_env recordfail; fi; fi
    }
    
    function load_video {
      insmod efi_gop
      insmod efi_uga
      insmod video_bochs
      insmod video_cirrus
    }
    
    insmod part_msdos
    insmod ext2
    set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
    search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
    if loadfont /usr/share/grub/unicode.pf2 ; then
      set gfxmode=auto
      load_video
      insmod gfxterm
    fi
    terminal_output gfxterm
    insmod part_msdos
    insmod ext2
    set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
    search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
    set locale_dir=($root)/boot/grub/locale
    set lang=en_US
    insmod gettext
    if [ "${recordfail}" = 1 ]; then
      set timeout=-1
    else
      set timeout=10
    fi
    ### END /etc/grub.d/00_header ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/05_debian_theme ###
    set menu_color_normal=white/black
    set menu_color_highlight=black/light-gray
    if background_color 44,0,30; then
      clear
    fi
    ### END /etc/grub.d/05_debian_theme ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###
    if [ ${recordfail} != 1 ]; then
      if hwmatch ${prefix}/gfxblacklist.txt 3; then
        if [ ${match} = 0 ]; then
          set linux_gfx_mode=keep
        else
          set linux_gfx_mode=text
        fi
      else
        set linux_gfx_mode=text
      fi
    else
      set linux_gfx_mode=text
    fi
    export linux_gfx_mode
    if [ "$linux_gfx_mode" != "text" ]; then load_video; fi
    menuentry 'Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.38-7-generic' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os {
        recordfail
        set gfxpayload=$linux_gfx_mode
        insmod part_msdos
        insmod ext2
        set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
        search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
        linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.38-7-generic root=UUID=169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516 ro   quiet splash vt.handoff=7
        initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.38-7-generic
    }
    menuentry 'Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.38-7-generic (recovery mode)' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os {
        recordfail
        set gfxpayload=$linux_gfx_mode
        insmod part_msdos
        insmod ext2
        set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
        search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
        echo    'Loading Linux 2.6.38-7-generic ...'
        linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.38-7-generic root=UUID=169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516 ro single 
        echo    'Loading initial ramdisk ...'
        initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.38-7-generic
    }
    ### END /etc/grub.d/10_linux ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###
    ### END /etc/grub.d/20_linux_xen ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###
    menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+)" {
        insmod part_msdos
        insmod ext2
        set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
        search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
        linux16    /boot/memtest86+.bin
    }
    menuentry "Memory test (memtest86+, serial console 115200)" {
        insmod part_msdos
        insmod ext2
        set root='(/dev/sda,msdos3)'
        search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516
        linux16    /boot/memtest86+.bin console=ttyS0,115200n8
    }
    ### END /etc/grub.d/20_memtest86+ ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ###
    if [ "x${timeout}" != "x-1" ]; then
      if keystatus; then
        if keystatus --shift; then
          set timeout=-1
        else
          set timeout=0
        fi
      else
        if sleep --interruptible 3 ; then
          set timeout=0
        fi
      fi
    fi
    ### END /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/40_custom ###
    # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries.  Simply type the
    # menu entries you want to add after this comment.  Be careful not to change
    # the 'exec tail' line above.
    ### END /etc/grub.d/40_custom ###
    
    ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/41_custom ###
    if [ -f  $prefix/custom.cfg ]; then
      source $prefix/custom.cfg;
    fi
    ### END /etc/grub.d/41_custom ###
    
    =============================== sda3/etc/fstab: ===============================
    
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # Use 'blkid -o value -s UUID' to print the universally unique identifier
    # for a device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name
    # devices that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
    # / was on /dev/sda3 during installation
    UUID=169c6f9a-32bc-4a6c-823f-a28b88c7d516 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
    # /home was on /dev/sda2 during installation
    UUID=12ebaa87-6931-4bb4-8dca-40c33120d6ee /home           ext4    defaults        0       2
    # swap was on /dev/sda4 during installation
    UUID=9f89777c-2b39-48e1-95fb-2dab56d45cd5 none            swap    sw              0       0
    
    =================== sda3: Location of files loaded by Grub: ===================
    
    
     683.1GB: boot/grub/grub.cfg
     664.3GB: boot/initrd.img-2.6.38-7-generic
     921.4GB: boot/vmlinuz-2.6.38-7-generic
     664.3GB: initrd.img
     921.4GB: vmlinuz
    
    =========================== sdb1/boot/grub/grub.cfg: ===========================
    
    
    if loadfont /boot/grub/font.pf2 ; then
        set gfxmode=auto
        insmod efi_gop
        insmod efi_uga
        insmod gfxterm
        terminal_output gfxterm
    fi
    
    set menu_color_normal=white/black
    set menu_color_highlight=black/light-gray
    
    menuentry "Try Ubuntu without installing" {
        set gfxpayload=keep
        linux    /casper/vmlinuz  file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper quiet splash --
        initrd    /casper/initrd.lz
    }
    menuentry "Install Ubuntu" {
        set gfxpayload=keep
        linux    /casper/vmlinuz  file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper only-ubiquity quiet splash --
        initrd    /casper/initrd.lz
    }
    menuentry "Check disc for defects" {
        set gfxpayload=keep
        linux    /casper/vmlinuz  boot=casper integrity-check quiet splash --
        initrd    /casper/initrd.lz
    }
    
    =================== sdb1: Location of files loaded by Grub: ===================
    
    
        ??GB: boot/grub/grub.cfg
    =========================== Unknown MBRs/Boot Sectors/etc =======================
    
    Unknown BootLoader  on sdb1
    
    00000000  eb 58 90 53 59 53 4c 49  4e 55 58 00 02 04 20 00  |.X.SYSLINUX... .|
    00000010  02 00 00 00 00 f8 00 00  3f 00 ff 00 f7 00 00 00  |........?.......|
    00000020  69 6b 1e 00 27 0f 00 00  00 00 00 00 02 00 00 00  |ik..'...........|
    00000030  01 00 06 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  |................|
    00000040  80 00 29 3f 0d 0e 18 4e  4f 20 4e 41 4d 45 20 20  |..)?...NO NAME  |
    00000050  20 20 46 41 54 33 32 20  20 20 fa fc 31 c9 8e d1  |  FAT32   ..1...|
    00000060  bc 76 7b 52 06 57 1e 56  8e c1 b1 26 bf 78 7b f3  |.v{R.W.V...&.x{.|
    00000070  a5 8e d9 bb 78 00 0f b4  37 0f a0 56 20 d2 78 1b  |....x...7..V .x.|
    00000080  31 c0 b1 06 89 3f 89 47  02 f3 64 a5 8a 0e 18 7c  |1....?.G..d....||
    00000090  88 4d bc 50 50 50 50 cd  13 eb 5c 8b 55 aa 8b 75  |.M.PPPP...\.U..u|
    000000a0  a8 c1 ee 04 01 f2 81 fa  b7 07 73 2b f6 45 b4 7f  |..........s+.E..|
    000000b0  75 25 38 4d b8 74 20 66  3d 21 47 50 54 75 10 80  |u%8M.t f=!GPTu..|
    000000c0  7d b8 ed 75 0a 66 ff 75  ec 66 ff 75 e8 eb 0f 51  |}..u.f.u.f.u...Q|
    000000d0  51 66 ff 75 bc eb 07 51  51 66 ff 36 1c 7c b4 08  |Qf.u...QQf.6.|..|
    000000e0  cd 13 72 13 20 e4 75 0f  c1 ea 08 42 89 16 1a 7c  |..r. .u....B...||
    000000f0  83 e1 3f 89 0e 18 7c fb  bb aa 55 b4 41 8a 16 74  |..?...|...U.A..t|
    00000100  7b cd 13 72 10 81 fb 55  aa 75 0a f6 c1 01 74 05  |{..r...U.u....t.|
    00000110  c6 06 45 7d 00 66 b8 72  1e 00 00 66 ba 00 00 00  |..E}.f.r...f....|
    00000120  00 bb 00 7e e8 10 00 66  81 3e 24 7e d4 ff 73 72  |...~...f.>$~..sr|
    00000130  75 76 ea 38 7e 00 00 66  03 06 60 7b 66 13 16 64  |uv.8~..f..`{f..d|
    00000140  7b b9 10 00 eb 2b 66 52  66 50 06 53 6a 01 6a 10  |{....+fRfP.Sj.j.|
    00000150  89 e6 66 60 b4 42 e8 7f  00 66 61 8d 64 10 72 01  |..f`.B...fa.d.r.|
    00000160  c3 66 60 31 c0 e8 70 00  66 61 e2 da c6 06 45 7d  |.f`1..p.fa....E}|
    00000170  2b 66 60 66 0f b7 36 18  7c 66 0f b7 3e 1a 7c 66  |+f`f..6.|f..>.|f|
    00000180  f7 f6 31 c9 87 ca 66 f7  f7 66 3d ff 03 00 00 77  |..1...f..f=....w|
    00000190  17 c0 e4 06 41 08 e1 88  c5 88 d6 b8 01 02 e8 37  |....A..........7|
    000001a0  00 66 61 72 01 c3 e2 c9  31 f6 8e d6 bc 68 7b 8e  |.far....1....h{.|
    000001b0  de 66 8f 06 78 00 be df  7d e8 09 00 31 c0 cd 16  |.f..x...}...1...|
    000001c0  cd 19 f4 eb fd 66 60 ac  20 c0 74 09 b4 0e bb 07  |.....f`. .t.....|
    000001d0  00 cd 10 eb f2 66 61 c3  8a 16 74 7b cd 13 c3 42  |.....fa...t{...B|
    000001e0  6f 6f 74 20 65 72 72 6f  72 0d 0a 00 00 00 00 00  |oot error.......|
    000001f0  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 55 aa  |..............U.|
    00000200

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Beans
    3,195

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Your boot loader wasn't installed the first time around -- probably because you changed the default location from /dev/sda to something else, although there could also be a bug in the installer. In any event, because of a partitioning issue, I recommend you start over again....

    Windows can't read Linux filesystems without additional drivers, and being new, ext4fs is particularly problematic. Thus, sharing an ext4fs /home partition with Windows will probably not work too well. I've heard of a tool that can access such partitions from Windows, but not by mounting the partition; you've got to use a special utility to transfer files. Maybe there's something else I'm unaware of, but unless you know of something yourself, I recommend you not use this configuration. Instead, I recommend you do one of two things:


    • Re-install with something similar to your current setup, but use ext3fs for /home rather than ext4fs. There are Windows drivers for ext2fs and ext3fs, although I don't know how well they work, and they don't seem to be very popular.
    • Use a configuration similar to the one you've got, but add another NTFS partition for data exchange.



    In the second case, you'll have to make some of your partitions logical rather than primary, and I recommend doing so for the first case, too. Linux can boot fine from logical partitions, but Windows can't, so plan accordingly. Having at least one logical partition on your disk gives you added flexibility for the future, should you want to resize and add more partitions at some point.

    In either event, pay attention during installation to where GRUB is installed. IIRC, that's done on the same screen as the partitioning.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    I agree with the separate NTFS partition for data.

    If you have /home separate & a shared NTFS partition then your system partitions do not have to be as large and compact system partitions are slightly more efficiency on very large drives.

    Most suggest 30GB as a minimum for win7 and 10GB as a minimum for Ubuntu. I would go double or triple depending on whether you think you will install a lot of software. In Ubuntu I have a lot of software installed and have used about 7GB of my 25GB / (root) partition. But all my data is in NTFS shared or ext3 data partitions.

    If you are not sure how much data you will have, you do not have to totally format drive. Just include all the free space the the extended partition so you can add more partitions or resize as needed.

    My suggestion for what it is worth:

    Windows:
    60-100GB NTFS with boot flag. Primary partition
    100GB primary NTFS for shared data
    Extended partition rest of drive.
    25GB Mountpoint / primary or logical beginning ext4(or ext3)
    100GB Mountpoint /home logical beginning ext3(or ext4)
    2GB Mountpoint swap logical
    That leaves lot unformated in the extended but for future use. Of course you can make partitions larger if you know you will have a lot of shared data or Linux data.

    You may also want to see this review:
    When It Works, Intel Core i5 2500K Graphics On Linux Are Fast!
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...dy_speed&num=1

    Another user with Core i5 issues:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1720194
    Last edited by oldfred; April 3rd, 2011 at 08:56 PM. Reason: Links
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Beans
    208
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    Your boot loader wasn't installed the first time around -- probably because you changed the default location from /dev/sda to something else, although there could also be a bug in the installer. In any event, because of a partitioning issue, I recommend you start over again....

    Windows can't read Linux filesystems without additional drivers, and being new, ext4fs is particularly problematic. Thus, sharing an ext4fs /home partition with Windows will probably not work too well. I've heard of a tool that can access such partitions from Windows, but not by mounting the partition; you've got to use a special utility to transfer files. Maybe there's something else I'm unaware of, but unless you know of something yourself, I recommend you not use this configuration. Instead, I recommend you do one of two things:


    • Re-install with something similar to your current setup, but use ext3fs for /home rather than ext4fs. There are Windows drivers for ext2fs and ext3fs, although I don't know how well they work, and they don't seem to be very popular.
    • Use a configuration similar to the one you've got, but add another NTFS partition for data exchange.



    In the second case, you'll have to make some of your partitions logical rather than primary, and I recommend doing so for the first case, too. Linux can boot fine from logical partitions, but Windows can't, so plan accordingly. Having at least one logical partition on your disk gives you added flexibility for the future, should you want to resize and add more partitions at some point.

    In either event, pay attention during installation to where GRUB is installed. IIRC, that's done on the same screen as the partitioning.
    I have heard that ext2fsd already has support for ext4 partitions..
    I installed grub on /dev/sda as it should be.
    Maybe you know why doing grub-install returns this strange error?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    I agree with the separate NTFS partition for data.

    If you have /home separate & a shared NTFS partition then your system partitions do not have to be as large and compact system partitions are slightly more efficiency on very large drives.

    Most suggest 30GB as a minimum for win7 and 10GB as a minimum for Ubuntu. I would go double or triple depending on whether you think you will install a lot of software. In Ubuntu I have a lot of software installed and have used about 7GB of my 25GB / (root) partition. But all my data is in NTFS shared or ext3 data partitions.

    If you are not sure how much data you will have, you do not have to totally format drive. Just include all the free space the the extended partition so you can add more partitions or resize as needed.

    My suggestion for what it is worth:

    Windows:
    60-100GB NTFS with boot flag. Primary partition
    100GB primary NTFS for shared data
    Extended partition rest of drive.
    25GB Mountpoint / primary or logical beginning ext4(or ext3)
    100GB Mountpoint /home logical beginning ext3(or ext4)
    2GB Mountpoint swap logical
    That leaves lot unformated in the extended but for future use. Of course you can make partitions larger if you know you will have a lot of shared data or Linux data.

    You may also want to see this review:
    When It Works, Intel Core i5 2500K Graphics On Linux Are Fast!
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...dy_speed&num=1

    Another user with Core i5 issues:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1720194
    I have 1TB, disk space is not a problem.
    Also, isn't the limit is 4 partitions?

    What do you suggest me to do? maybe I just should wait for the final release of 11.04?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    With MBR the limit is 4 primary partitions, but one primary can become an extended which can hold many logical.

    One advantage of gpt is all partitions are primary. GPT limit seems to be 128 partitions, but some systems may limit it to less. I have not gotten over about 13 in MBR and 4 in gpt, so I do not know..

    Basics of partitions:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DualBoot/Partitions
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition

    If you make huge partitions for an operating system then the hard drive has to search all over the drive for all the system files. Best to keep system compact maybe more so with very large drives. Let data be in large partitions.
    For info on UEFI boot install & repair:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to close thread when/if answered completely.







  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    a puddle in Manchester
    Beans
    9,206
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Firstly, you can't have a shared data partition of type ext4 and then mount it as /home, as I explained earlier. Windows will not even see it! It is not a good idea to share a /home partition, and certainly not with a Windows system. Please be clear on this.
    If you want a total of more than 4 partitions on one disc (and it is a mbr partitioned disc) you will need to make one of the primary partitions an extended partition. Then, in that extended partition you can create many logical partitions.

    For some reason grub is not being installed on your installation.
    As your partitions are at the moment, you can boot from the live cd/usb and run these commands in a terminal
    Code:
    sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt
    sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda
    This will hopefully get Ubuntu booting.

    Obviously if you are intending to change your partition structure, you will effectively be deleting everything anyway.
    Please be sure about what you want to achieve and then find out how to go about that.
    MacBook Pro 10,1 retina

  8. #28
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    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Quote Originally Posted by Avidanborisov View Post
    I have heard that ext2fsd already has support for ext4 partitions..
    A Google search turned up this page that describes ext2fsd features, including some ext4 features; but note that qualifier "some." That page also states that at least one ext4fs feature (extents) is not supported. It's unclear to me what the level of ext4fs support is in practice. Therefore, before relying on this driver, I strongly recommend that you either run extensive tests or track down multiple end-user reports of how well it works (or doesn't work).

    Note that ext4fs provides no make-or-break advantages over ext3fs for your configuration. At best, it will be a little bit faster in some operations. If Windows interoperability is important, my suspicion is that ext3fs is a much better choice.

    I installed grub on /dev/sda as it should be.
    Maybe you know why doing grub-install returns this strange error?
    Because you were installing it from a live CD without doing the necessary preliminary steps. I didn't address this issue in my earlier post because I think it's best for you to re-partition and re-install.

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred
    One advantage of gpt is all partitions are primary. GPT limit seems to be 128 partitions, but some systems may limit it to less. I have not gotten over about 13 in MBR and 4 in gpt, so I do not know..
    This is getting very obscure, but the GPT specification states that the GPT partition array must be a minimum of 16,384 bytes. The size of each partition entry is 128 bytes (although the specification states that this value is not fixed), for a minimum of 128 partitions. The size of the partition array may be greater than the minimum, so if the disk is partitioned appropriately, it can hold more than 128 partitions. In practice, it's possible to create a partition table that holds fewer than 128 partition entries. This violates the GPT specification, but every OS I've tried accepts such disks just fine. (Partitioning tools based on libparted, OTOH, don't; they flake out. They also flake out when the partition table is larger than 128 entries, which constitutes a bug since the GPT specification explicitly permits such configurations.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Quackers
    It is not a good idea to share a /home partition, and certainly not with a Windows system. Please be clear on this.
    I disagree with this, at least to a point. Sharing a /home partition between different Linux installations is perfectly OK, provided you don't try to share individual users' home directories (/home/fred or whatever). Sharing home directories can create problems because different distributions are likely to have different versions of many user programs, and these may have different configuration file formats. Even when the versions and file formats are compatible, they may refer to different icon files, program executable locations, etc. The result is that you're likely to end up with configuration problems when booting between the distributions.

    These problems are easily overcome by using different user home directories in the different distributions -- say, /home/fredu for Ubuntu and /home/fredf for Fedora. The easiest way to do this is to use different usernames in each distribution; however, it's possible to use the same username along with different home directories; you've just got to tweak the user configuration.

    There can also be user ID (UID) and group ID (GID) mapping issues, but those apply even if you use separate (non-/home) data partitions, so the issue isn't really any different for a /home partition as for separate data partitions.

    Setting things up to work properly this way does require a bit of know-how, rather than just blundering in using the defaults; however, I would argue that if you're setting up a computer to dual-boot different Linux distributions, you should possess that level of know-how to begin with. If you don't, you should stick with a single distribution. If you want to try something else, do it in a virtual environment (VirtualBox, VMWare, etc.) or by using a live CD. Setting up multiple distributions on a single computer poses a variety of challenges relating to partitioning, boot loaders, etc., and if you're not well beyond the beginner stage, those challenges will become problems.

    Moving on a bit, giving Windows access to a /home partition poses some modest risks, but nothing too great -- provided the driver works perfectly. You might accidentally damage user program configuration files from Windows, but if it's just the /home partition, you can reset that program to use its defaults by deleting the damaged files. (If you accidentally delete configuration files in Windows, you'll find that the programs revert to their default settings.) That said, giving Windows access to your Linux root (/) partition is much riskier; if you accidentally trash Linux system files in Windows, recovering might be much harder, since the computer might not boot into Linux any more, or it might be lacking important functionality.

    Note my caveat about the driver, though. As I wrote earlier, it's unclear to me that the ext2fsd driver for Windows handles ext4fs properly. I don't follow Windows drivers for Linux filesystems very carefully, so I can't even be sure that they work well for ext2fs or ext3fs. Thus, I recommend you research this issue very carefully before you rely on such a configuration. Using the Linux FAT or NTFS drivers and a separate partition for shared data seems to be much better tested and is known to work well. Of course, if you expect 99% of your use to be in Linux, and you don't know what files you might want to access from Windows, it might make sense to use an ext2/3/4fs driver in Windows even if that driver is imperfect.

  9. #29
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    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    Hey again
    look, I am really confused so just suggest me the best option you see for me.

    I have 1TB HD (actually, my gparted says I have 930GB). I want to have a:

    1. Windows Partition.
    2. Linux Partition.
    3. Something to be shared between them. I mean, I want that for example the pictures, music, video, documents folder in ubuntu to be the same ones as in windows music, pictures, documents library.
    Maybe I even don't need an extra partition, just suggest me what is the best option for sharing the same data pictures, music, videos between the two operating systems. And I would like to say that I use Linux more than windows so I prefer a better option for Linux instead of a better option for windows.
    4. SWAP

    OK

  10. #30
    Join Date
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    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: 11.04 Beta Live-USB

    What I would recommend is this.
    As you now have a MBR partitioned disc, I believe, you should first create a NTFS partition for Windows. You can create this partition in gparted, from the live cd. It can be as large or as small as you wish.
    Install Windows.
    WHen Windows is installed, just check in the Disk Management Console that Windows only used the one primary partition. If you are using a Windows installation disc, it probably will.
    If that's ok and Windows is booting ok, you can then boot from the Ubuntu live cd and select "try ubuntu".
    Using gparted you can then create an extended partition. This partition can use up the remaining disc space, if you wish.
    Then, within that partition you can create as many logical partitions as you want. These partitions could be, for example,
    a Ubuntu root partition (mount point /) of 12 - 15GB
    a swap partition, the size of which would depend on whether you intend to use hibernation, and on how much ram you have installed.
    a home partition (mount point /home) of whatever size you wish. This will hold your personal files and settings.
    a shared partition of type NTFS (I believe is best, but check that) of whatever size you wish. This for everything you want to share between Windows and Ubuntu.

    You can then install Ubuntu to those (root and /home) partitions.

    On rebooting, Ubuntu will boot directly and you should then open a terminal and run
    Code:
    sudo update-grub
    and watch as grub.cfg is run, to make sure that the Windows Loader is recognised.
    If it is you can reboot and make sure that both operating systems then boot from the grub menu.

    Voila, a dual boot system.

    Other options are available if you wish
    Last edited by Quackers; April 10th, 2011 at 04:02 PM.
    MacBook Pro 10,1 retina

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