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Thread: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

  1. #21
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    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    I added the partitions I wanted automounted to

    System > Preferences > Startup Applications

    using gvfs-mount-d for each partition, and rebooted.

    It works!

    Now all we need is a simple one panel GUI to check box the partitions we want automounted this way with gvfs-mount, and we'll be set

    A simple check box added to System>Administration>Disk Utility or elsewhere would be a great help (hint hint)

  2. #22
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    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    http://sukiprattle.blogspot.com/2010...vfs-mount.html


    While I do admire the authors investigative skill and it does seem to be the answer for your particular requirement he does show a total lack of understanding on how fstab works:
    Why use gvfs-mount
    Usually when talking about automounting on startup people would suggest user to add entries in /etc/fstab. The problem is that if we mount a partition from fstab, we need to have admin right to unmount/remount the partition.
    The whole point of adding an entry into fstab is to have the partition mount at boot so it's always available to the user. Why is he trying to unmount it? If he wants to mount and unmount it then leave the system set up as it is and mount and unmount it from Places. If he doesn't want to be asked for a password to mount from Places then install 10.10.
    And another uncool thing is that if we automount using mount command & entries in fstab, anything that we delete from the partition will not go into trash instead it will be deleted from your harddisk as soon as you click delete. You wont find it in trash, believe me.
    I don't know how he set up his fstab entry but he has total control over that.

    If he set it up this way:
    /dev/sda5 /media/Data vfat utf8,umask=007,gid=46 0 1
    BTW, this is the entry that Ubuntu would create for that partition had you asked it to do so during the initial install ( except it uses UUID instead of /dev/sdxy ).

    Then he is correct - sort of. It will not show up in his trash because he is not the owner of the partition - root it.
    If he set it up this way:
    /dev/sda5 /media/Data vfat utf8,umask=007,uid=1000,gid=46 0 1
    Then he is the owner of the partition and it will show up in his trash.
    Last edited by Morbius1; March 25th, 2011 at 01:19 PM.

  3. #23
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    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    pysdm appears to be a GUi tool that enables automount setup, though I haven't tried it-

    http://askubuntu.com/questions/18229...-disk-partions

    http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=pysdm

  4. #24
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    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    This utility is not anymore maintained and somewhat outdated. It does not support mounting by UUID, which you need in today´s computers.

  5. #25
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    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    Quote Originally Posted by vanadium View Post
    This utility is not anymore maintained and somewhat outdated. It does not support mounting by UUID, which you need in today´s computers.

    Just curious as to the reasoning of why you "need" UUID mounting. You can just as easily mount by raw name, and the OS won't care.

  6. #26
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    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    Device name, what you call "raw name", may change between boots. UUID's not.

  7. #27
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    Re: Automount partitions Ubuntu 10.x

    Quote Originally Posted by vanadium View Post
    Device name, what you call "raw name", may change between boots. UUID's not.
    Correct.

    Assuming "raw name" means /dev/sdXY, this is a POOR method to reference partitions for mounting, because that designation can change between reboots. This means it's a RELATIVE partition referencing method.

    An ABSOLUTE partition referencing/identification method is needed.

    The two best ABSOLUTE referencing methods for partitions are by UUID or disklabel.

    I prefer disklabel, because it is trivial to update by the user, you can call it whatever you want, from the old familiar Windows style C, D, E, etc, to plain english labels like Data, Videos, Photos, DVR, MythTV, etc. These won't change between reboots, or removing the drive and plugging it into another computer, etc. The disklabel acts as a simpler user friendly proxy for the UUID for that partition

    The UUID can still be used by the OS for it's internal technical housekeeping and to resolve conflicts with identical disklabels, but there is little reason for normal user's to ever know about it.

    It amazes me how these simple usability issues with disc mounting treament are still cropping up in 2011 in Linuxland.

    It wasn't too long ago (pre 2004?) when we had to manually mount optical discs, rather than the automounting behavior we expect today.

    Don't know why we still go around in circles with mount/automount issues and policies for hard disks, whose behavior changes depending on the filesystem type (fat32/ntfs/etx2/3, etc), hard disk connection method (internal IDE/SATA vs USB/Firewire) and other variables.

    We need uniform disk/partition mounting behaviors.

    To be fair, I experienced similar issues in my Windows (win98SE/XP) days years ago. As I added hard disks and USB disks and changed partitions, drive letter assignments (D:, E:, etc, analogous to /dev/sdb, /dev/sdc, etc) would change, and the same physical drive would get a different letter (or letters, dependig on number of partitions). Plus, I never used anything but fat32 and NTFS then, while Linux supports FAR more by default, which complicates issues.

    So, always refering to partitions using an absolute identifier like UUID first, then disklabel (convenience for the user, especially non-techie users), is probably the best way to finally resolve the floating partition references problem.
    Last edited by rgb1701; March 25th, 2011 at 08:34 PM.

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