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Thread: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

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    Thumbs up Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Last Update: 6-Jan-2011

    Dual Booting Guide – Windows XP & Ubuntu 10.04 From A -Z




    Special Thank
    I'd like to show my appreciation to this great community. I'm so thankful for all kind of help and support. Special thank also goes to this forum and everyone who works hard to keep it active and alive. Without this forum, I wouldn't be here and without seeing the light after +10 years of darkness, I wouldn't use Ubuntu specifically and Linux generally.

    Thank you for everything





    Contents
    Part 1 - Installation

    [1-1] Scenario 1: Dual Booting System from Scratch on The Same HDD.

    [1-2] Scenario 2: Dual Booting System from Scratch, Each OS on its own HDD.

    [1-3] Scenario 3: Dual Booting System - Windows XP is already installed and uses the entire HDD.

    [1-4] Scenario 4: Dual Booting System - Ubuntu 10.04 is already installed, uses the entire disk and there is only ONE HDD.

    [1-5] Scenario 5: Dual Booting System - Ubuntu 10.04 is already installed, uses the entire disk and there is TWO HDD.

    [1-6] Scenario 6: Dual Booting System - Windows XP is already installed and Install Ubuntu 10.04 on USB Drive.



    Part 2 - Installation Problems & Troubleshooting

    [2-1] Installation Problems/Problems During Installation

    [2-2] Problems After Installation



    Part 3 - Un-installation/Removing Ubuntu/Windows

    [3-1] Un-installation/Removing of Ubuntu and keeping Windows.
    [3-2]
    Un-installation/Removing of Windows and keeping Ubuntu.


    ================================================== ===============


    Part 1 - Installation


    Preface
    Definitely, this is one of the most important topics on daily basis. Who doesn’t Dual-Boot Ubuntu with Windows? Most of the users including me are still Dual-Booting (Ubuntu & Windows) – if not Multi-Booting – regardless what’s the reason behind that.
    I see daily perhaps 10 threads or more with the same title. All posters are having Dual-Booting Problems because in most cases they did not follow the right procedure and they end up with problems.

    Note that:
    A- This guide should also work with Windows Vista and Windows 7 with some differences especially the screenshots (images). The main concept should be the same. In case of major differences, I'll make sure to highlight that.

    B- You need to refer to your Motherboard's Manual. My BIOS Settings could be different from your BIOS Settings. The concept is the same but there might be some minor changes.

    C- I tried to include all the images I have but I'm ONLY allowed to post 8 images. That's why you'll find links to these images. Had to update the guide after I wrote it.



    Aim of this Guide

    To save everyone’s time and to make it easier for Windows Users who are willing to try/use Ubuntu or those new Ubuntu’s users who just installed Ubuntu, this thread has been created.
    I’ll do my best to make it as simple as possible so everyone could understand it. Even if you know nothing about computers, you should be fine with this guide. However, I assume you have basic understanding about computers.

    I believe this thread will clear any confusion especially if users will follow each step as it’s and read this guide very carefully.

    About this Guide
    This guide has been written by myself and I’ve never taken any single word from any other website, guide, post or whatever source you could think about. This guide has been written based on a real experience and the most recent experiment of installing Windows and Ubuntu on a PC. However, I thought I could write this guide without including any website’s link but I’d like to give the reader more than one choice. After all, this guide will be used by others and they have to find all or most of what they’re looking for.

    My plan is to discuss all the possible scenarios and cover everything about Dual-Booting. Please note that this is not a thread to list some common problems and offer some solutions. This thread is a very simple guide that I believe if you’ll follow, you’ll not have any issue. Of course nothing is prefect and I may forget something here or there but that shouldn’t be a problem because I can update the thread on daily basis and my friends here will inform me if I need to add/remove something. After all, I’m not alone and I’m just like you, a user who Dual-Boot.
    I believe that an image could worth 1000 words if not more. Thus, I’ll do this my way which I believe it’s very informative and include an image with each step. That image will help you a lot to understand what’s going on and what I’m talking about.
    A Guide for Dual-Booting Windows and Ubuntu could found be here:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot


    However, as I mentioned, I’m trying to create a very simple guide.



    Hardware Used (click):

    Motherboard: Intel
    CPU: Pentium 4 @3.00GHz
    *RAM: 448MB DDR PC400
    *HDD: Samsung 20GB
    Graphics Card: ATI (Built-in)


    Requirements:

    Windows XP Disk (CD)
    Ubuntu LiveCD or LiveUSB

    *I decided to use the minimal hardware requirements. I’m using my Test-PC.
    Please check these links for more information about the minimum system requirements to run Ubuntu.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_...m_requirements

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LucidLynx/ReleaseNotes


    Scenario 1: Dual Booting System from Scratch on The Same HDD

    Introduction:
    Installation of Windows XP and Ubuntu 10.04 on a brand new HDD or a wiped HDD. This section will explain in details all the steps needed to prepare the HDD, Install XP, make sure the machine is up and running with Windows XP and then install Ubuntu 10.04 on the same HDD and while Windows XP is already installed. This section should cover everything needed to create a Dual Booting System with both XP and Ubuntu installed on the same HDD.

    Plan
    First of all, you need a plan. In a better word, you should know what you want and how to achieve that.
    Our plan here is simple:
    a) Install Windows XP on a Brand New HDD or Wiped HDD.
    b) Make sure XP is up and running
    c) Install Ubuntu 10.04.

    IMHO, the most important step is preparing the HDD. Yes, partitioning the HDD is very important. It's much better to start partitioning your HDD, then, start installing.

    Part I: Installing Windows XP

    1) If your HDD is already installed, then please go to step 3.

    2) If your HDD is new and you have no idea how to install it in your machine, then google is your friend. However, Please check this guide. Make sure that your BIOS is able to recognize the new HDD.

    3) Make sure to check your BIOS Settings.

    >> image

    The image above explains itself.
    Please, make sure that your CD-Drive is your first Device to boot from all the way. That should be your default settings. If not, set it this way. Whether you're installing new OS or not, it's recommended to set the CD-Drive as the first device to boot from.

    4) There are two options that you should be aware of. There is Boot Priority Device and there is Hard Disk Boot Priority.

    Boot Priority Device > List all the Drivers you have (HDD, CD-Drive, etc).

    Hard Disk Boot Priority > If you have more than one HDD or if you're booting from HDD and/or USB, then you need to check this option and change the priorities according to your needs.

    This image will help you to understand:

    >> image

    In this case, there's only one HDD drive installed. In case there is more than one HDD or there's a USB Drive, you'll see more entries.
    In this part and as long as we do have only one HDD, then you should see something like the above image. Unless you have an USB Drive, you'll see two entries.


    5) As per Step 3, your CD-Drive should be the first device to boot from. Insert your Windows XP Disc and start Windows Installation.

    6) The HDD I have used in this guide is not new, it's a wiped HDD. You should see something like this:

    > Image

    Now, before we carry on to the next step, please remember that we're planning to create a Dual-Boot System so there's another OS to be installed. Make sure NOT to allocate the whole space of your HDD to Windows.

    7) This guide assumes that you'll use 10GB of the HDD (which is 20GB) and allocate it to Windows.

    > Image

    Again, don't allocate the whole space to Windows.


    8 ) After that, you should see something like this:

    > Image

    If that's what you see, then you're good to go.


    9) Whether it's new or wiped HDD, use the third option:

    > Image

    10) The rest of steps are the regular steps you need to follow to install XP. Nothing special at all. If you don't know how to install Windows XP, please use google.

    Once XP is up and running, then it's a sign that you finished Part I. Congratulation.



    Part II: Preparations to Install Ubuntu 10.04

    1) Please click here.

    2) Do not proceed unless you check the integrity of your downloaded iso for Ubuntu. This is how.
    You also need this.

    3) As discussed previously, your CD-Drive must be the first device to boot from. This is just a reminder
    *In case you are planning to use LiveUSB to install Ubuntu, then please make sure your USB Device should be the "first" device to boot from then your HDD should comes as the second one. Refer to Step 3 and Step 4 in Part I. Same screenshot but with another entry for your USB Device.


    Note that: some motherboards do not support that option to boot from USB Devices. Then you have to options:
    a) Use LiveCD
    b) http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanager.html


    4) Insert Ubuntu's LiveCD or USB and press any key. You should get this screen:

    >> image

    Choose: Try Ubuntu without Installation.


    5) Now, sometimes, you may face some problems with the LiveCD and you may not reach the point when you can see the GUI Desktop. There are many reasons for that. Either it's your Graphics Card, CD is corrupted, you have low hardware specifications or it could be something else.
    That's another story I might be able to discuss later on.

    6) Once you see the Desktop, please run GParted.

    > Image

    Note that: Starting from Ubuntu 10.04, after installation, GParted will not be installed by default with Ubuntu, you may want to install it manually later on.


    7) Once you start GParted, it should look like this:

    > Image

    Before we carry on, please make sure to read this carefully.


    8 ) Please, refer back to the previous step. Step 7
    Yes, do yourself a favor and read it all. Trust me, you'll thank me for this


    9) I'm going to list all the steps you need to do as images. These images worth more than 1,000,000 words

    *Please "click" on each step so that you can access the image.

    Step (a)
    Select the "unallocated space" - Right Click - and choose "New".
    Please, make sure not to do anything to the first partition which is "/dev/sda1" as this is the Windows Partition.

    Step (b)
    The whole remaining space will be allocated to the Extended Partition. If you still don't know what does "Extended Partition mean, please refer back to step 7.

    Step (c)

    Step (d)

    Step (e)

    Step (f)
    Please make sure to double check what you've done before clicking on "Apply".

    Step (g)
    GParted should look like that after you're done.



    Part III: Installing Ubuntu 10.04

    1) Please click here and have a look at the official installation guide. No need to say it's a must read as well.

    What I'm trying to highlight in this guide, could save your time and everyone's else time. Everyone can install Ubuntu but not anyone could do that without mistakes. This guide, will make sure you'll do it without any mistake if you follow the steps correctly.

    2) Unfortunately, the Graphical Installation Guide does not show/mention the Manual/Advanced Option which is (IMHO) is the most important part of the installation process. Thus, you need to choose this option as per the below image:

    > Image


    3) As you may know so far, Linux uses different naming-scheme than Windows. There's no C drive and stuff like that.
    Having the said, in this guide, I'm trying to install Ubuntu in partition sda5 and use sda6 (home) and sda7 (swap) as well. Yes, the best partitioning scheme is to have 3 partitions: root, home and swap.
    Root and swap are must. Home partition is not but recommended.


    4) You need to click on each partition to set the mounting point.

    > Image


    > Creating the first mounting point which is "/".

    >> Image


    > Creating the second mounting point which is "/home".

    >> Image


    > And this is the final step. Click "Forward" but as usual, make sure everything is correct.

    >>
    Image
    5) As long as you have installed Windows XP first, you'll see something like this:

    > Image

    Since you just installed XP and there's no documents to import, then just click "Forward" and that's all.


    6) Now, here comes the most important part of any Ubuntu Installation, period.
    You need to pay so much attention to this step. However, at this point, if you will proceed with the default option, you're still safe but it's much better to check it. Why? you need to be familiar with that option.

    >>> IMAGE

    Step 8 as per the image above is the last step of the installation process.
    Once you reach here, click "Advanced".
    You'll see another window "Advanced Options".
    As you can see above, these are the advanced options you got.
    This step should determine which Boot Loader will take the control to boot your machine.
    Long story short, the best option is to use GRUB2 as your main boot loader.
    GRUB2 is the best boot loader I've ever seen. In order to give GRUB2 (Ubuntu's boot loader) the full control over the booting process, you need to choose to install it on the MBR of your HDD as per the image above.

    sda > means GRUB2 will be installed in the MBR.

    sda1> means GRUB2 will be installed in Windows Partition. The same partition (C in Windows) that you used to install Windows on.

    sda5 > means you'll install GRUB2 in Ubuntu's root partition.
    sda6 > means you'll install GRUB2 in Ubuntu's home partition.

    The only option you "have" to take is to install the boot loader (GRUB2) in the MBR which is sda.
    Unless you have another reason that could prevent you from doing so. Yes, there are another boot loaders but this guide will not discuss that.

    Click "Install" once you're done.

    *Later on once we go further with this guide, we'll need this step a lot. Please, make sure to understand it.


    7) Make a cup of tea or perhaps a cup of coffee and wait until the installation is done. It will take forever I'm kidding, you'll be amazed how fast the installation is.
    However, if you're connecting to the internet, the installation process will take more time. During the installation, some files/packages will be downloaded from the internet, thus it might take a bit longer.

    8 ) Once the installation is done, a restart is required but hey, don't worry, Ubuntu (Linux) is not like Windows, "Restart" process is not a common task that you need to do every 5 mins
    Before the machine will reboot, you need to take out the installation media whether it's LiveCD or LiveUSB.
    Press Enter and wait ...

    9) After restarting, you should get something like this:

    > Image


    10) You are DONE.

    Congratulation, you have installed your first Dual-Booting System "successfully"

    Last edited by amjjawad; January 7th, 2011 at 12:12 AM. Reason: Updating

  2. #2
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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Moved to Tips and Tutorials.
    Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence. Abigail Adams ( 1744 - 1818 ), 1780;

    My blog Poetry and More Free Ubuntu Magazine

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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Without clicking on every link I see no mention of the bootscript. Really if a person needs this much of a tutorial they should be asking for help with this script posted.

    XP wont install to a sata drive without drives as well. The bios can be set to read the ide type and installs go okay generally, when the bios allows this change.





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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Quote Originally Posted by wilee-nilee View Post
    Without clicking on every link I see no mention of the bootscript. Really if a person needs this much of a tutorial they should be asking for help with this script posted.
    From About this guide:
    Please note that this is not a thread to list some common problems and offer some solutions. This thread is a very simple guide that I believe if you’ll follow, you’ll not have any issue.
    However, if you read carefully, you'll understand that this guide is not finished yet. I'm planning to include more stuff.
    This guide for installation not troubleshooting. Read the first part of this guide.

    XP wont install to a sata drive without drives as well.
    Could you explain that?

  5. #5
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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Quote Originally Posted by amjjawad View Post
    From About this guide:


    However, if you read carefully, you'll understand that this guide is not finished yet. I'm planning to include more stuff.
    This guide for installation not troubleshooting. Read the first part of this guide.


    Could you explain that?
    XP needs sata divers to be put on a sata drive.

    I can appreciate your want to write a tutorial, but there are a bunch already and web links. A tutorial can make it seem somebody understands but can also get them into deep dodo if not followed correctly.





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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Quote Originally Posted by wilee-nilee View Post
    XP needs sata divers to be put on a sata drive.
    My copy of XP already has that.

    I can appreciate your want to write a tutorial, but there are a bunch already and web links. A tutorial can make it seem somebody understands but can also get them into deep dodo if not followed correctly.
    I'm aware of that. Again, if you read the guide, you'll find it's full of websites, etc etc. On the beginning, I already included the official installation guide.
    This guide is just the beginning for me. I had one before but that needs so much modifications which I'm working on. I'm still new here. I'm trying to help the beginners and new comers.
    This is NOT for proficient Linux/Windows Users at all
    I'm going to use this guide later on as I'm working on something a bit bigger.

    Thank you

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    Re: Dual-Booting Windows & Ubuntu From A-Z

    Quote Originally Posted by amjjawad View Post
    My copy of XP already has that.



    I'm aware of that. Again, if you read the guide, you'll find it's full of websites, etc etc. On the beginning, I already included the official installation guide.
    This guide is just the beginning for me. I had one before but that needs so much modifications which I'm working on. I'm still new here. I'm trying to help the beginners and new comers.
    This is NOT for proficient Linux/Windows Users at all
    I'm going to use this guide later on as I'm working on something a bit bigger.

    Thank you
    Is your copy of XP a OEM?





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    Thumbs up Scenario 2: Dual Booting System from Scratch, Each OS on its own HDD

    Scenario 2: Dual Booting System from Scratch, Each OS on its own HDD

    Introduction:
    Before reading further, I assume you already read Scenario 1 in this guide. If you haven’t done that yet, please try to at least skim it.
    This scenario should cover the installation of XP and Ubuntu each on its own HDD. This is one of my favorite methods of installation, whether I’m Dual-Booting or Multi-Booting.
    Windows XP will be installed on HDD1.
    Ubuntu will be installed on HDD2.
    *I’m going to use “HDD1/HDD2” in general and “sda/sdb/sdb1” when talking about Ubuntu.

    If you have an old HDD that you’re not using, especially if it’s small in size (say 20/40GB) then this method is really helpful.

    Plan
    a) Install Windows XP on HDD1 (Brand New or Wiped HDD).
    b) Make sure XP is up and running.
    c) Install Ubuntu 10.04 on HDD2 (Brand New or Wiped HDD)
    d) Make sure Ubuntu is up and running.

    As I mentioned before, prepare the HDD is very important step that you need to be aware of. In this scenario, there’s another important step you need to do. You need to make sure the BIOS is set to boot the right/correct HDD. Note that you have now two HDDs so it’s a bit different here.

    Part I: Installing Windows XP

    1) Make sure your BIOS settings are correct. HDD1 must be the first Hard Disk to boot from.
    See this > image.

    Remember, your CD-Drive must be the first “device” to boot from NOT the first HDD to boot from. I already explained that previously. Please, don’t be confused.

    2) Now, you’ll follow almost the same steps as before with few changes:
    a) Make sure to choose the correct HDD to install XP on. In this guide, we’re installing Windows XP on HDD1.

    b) You don’t need to worry about partitioning HDD1 (where are you going to install XP on) because the whole Hard Disk will be used by XP unless you want to create more than one partition for Windows XP. For me, I allocate the whole HDD for XP. As I mentioned before, most likely you’re using a small size old HDD. If your HDD is large and you want to share it with Ubuntu then please refer back to Scenario 1.

    3) Done.

    Part II: Preparations to Install Ubuntu 10.04

    It’s true that Ubuntu will be installed on HDD2 and it seems there is no need to prepare the HDD since Ubuntu supposed to use the whole space.
    Wrong answer. Even though Ubuntu will use the whole space in HDD2, IMHO, it’s recommended to prepare the HDD before installing Ubuntu. Why? Because I suppose you’re going to “TRY” Ubuntu before installing it. It’s always better to make sure your machine is capable of running Ubuntu without any kind of problems and somehow the Live Session (TRYING Ubuntu without Installation –NO changes will be made to your HDDs) is a good idea and the first step that one should do.
    1) Please refer back to Scenario1-PartII- step1 step2
    2) Now, reboot/restart your machine and change your BIOS settings so that HDD2 (where Ubuntu is going to be installed) will be the first HDD to boot from.
    See >image.
    I think by now, you understand what does that mean and you’re able to do it

    3) You’ll follow the same steps in Scenario1-PartII but remember, Ubuntu will use the whole space in HDD2 (sda).
    Make sure you select the correct HDD (see this image)

    sda
    is HDD2
    sdb
    is HDD1

    >>
    sdb (HDD1) has Windows XP so make sure NOT to select that HDD.

    The difference in this case will be very minor:
    sda1 (in this image)will not be used by Windows and will not be NTFS.
    sda1 partition will be used by Ubuntu, will be ext4 and it will be the root partition.
    Yes, it will remain “Primary Partition”.

    So, you’ll have:
    sda1: root partition (ext4) – Primary Partition
    sda2: Extended Partition
    sda5: home partition (ext4) – Logical Partition
    sda6: swap partition (linux-swap) – Logical Partition

    However, you may want to create a Data or a shared partition between Windows and Ubuntu. Remember I mentioned that this scenario might be used when you have an old IDE/SATA HDD that you are going to use it for Windows and most likely it’s small in size. Having that said, a data partition which can be used by both Operating Systems is good idea. All what you need to do is to create another partition (after you already created root, home and swap for Ubuntu) and format it as NTFS. That’s all.

    *Ubuntu “by default” can access NTFS (read/write) Partitions while Windows “by default” cannot access ext4 Partitions.


    If you’ll create a data partition (NTFS) then:
    sda7: data partition (NTFS) – Logical Partition


    4) Done.


    Part III: Installing Ubuntu 10.04

    Same procedure you followed in scenario1 except few change:

    1) As we did before, you need to select the advanced option for installation (specify partitions manually – advanced)

    2) Please, make sure to select the correct HDD from the list. Please see this:
    >image

    You need to select sda (HDD2) from that list. Forget the partitions which are already exist in that screenshot. The point is to show you which Hard Disk (sda) you need to select in this case.
    Then, follow the same steps as discussed and explained in Scenario1-PartIII.

    3) Again, the most important part is “Installing the Boot Loader”.
    The only difference in this scenario is you’ll see more entries in the list.
    >> IMAGE

    In the above image, you may see lots of entries. It’s because I couldn’t wipe my HDD2 which already has Ubuntu (and another OS). The point is:
    You need to install the Boot Loader of Ubuntu (GRUB2) in the MBR of sda (HDD2).

    The reason why you need to install the Boot Loader in the MBR of sda (HDD2) is because you want GRUB2 (Ubuntu’s Boot Loader) to take the full control over the booting process.
    I’m planning to write more guides for troubleshooting. Sooner or later, you’ll understand why it’s important to install GRUB2 in the MBR.

    4) Click “Install” and once the installation is done, you should see the same screen.

    5) You are DONE
    Last edited by amjjawad; December 20th, 2010 at 11:42 AM.

  9. #9
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    Wink Scenario 3: Dual Booting System - Windows XP is already installed and uses the entire

    Scenario 3: Dual Booting System - Windows XP is already installed and uses the entire HDD

    Please note:
    As of now, I'm going to write a very short steps regarding this scenario. If you already read the other scenarios (1 and 2) then you should understand what I'm talking about. If not, I'll update this guide later one with more details.



    If you have only one HDD and you decided to install Ubuntu and Dual-Boot it with Windows XP which is already installed, up and running then this is the right place to start from.

    1) BACKUP All your important data. Use External HDD if possible.

    2) Please, refer back to step #1.

    3) There are some programs that could backup the OS itself as an image which can be restored later on. Check your HDD-manufacture's website for more details or use some common programs such us Norton Ghost. I prefer this way but if you don't mind to spend the whole day installing all your favorite applications then ignore this. Definitely, this is an extra step to be in the safe side + if you need Windows and you don't want to lose it in the process.

    *4) Use CCleaner to get rid of all the temp files, cookies, etc.

    *5) Disk Defragment.

    6) Boot your machine from Ubuntu LiveCD/USB. Choose try Ubuntu and then start GParted (System > Administration > GParted).
    Note that, you can use other programs but as long as you already have the LiveCD/USB, you don't need to worry about that.

    7) There's one HDD. Most likely, there's one partition for Windows (this is the default case). When it comes to Linux/Ubuntu, the HDDs and Partitions names will be different. If you don't know that already, you really need to read more about the basics of Linux.
    In this case, you got sda (HDD1) and sda1 Partition (Drive C in Windows) by default.
    You need to re-size sda1.
    Make sure NOT to shrink too much. Just take what you really need or what Ubuntu needs. Nothing specific, it's totally up to you and your daily usage.

    8 ) Please, once you re-size sda1, DO NOT do any other operation. Just click "Apply" to apply the change (re-sizing sda1).


    9 ) Re-boot/Restart your machine to make sure Windows is still up and running.

    10) If everything is okay, insert your LiveCD/USB and restart your machine. Choose "try Ubuntu", start GParted, create Ubuntu's Partitions (root and swap if you don't want separate home partition or go for the recommended scheme and create root, home and swap) and then Install Ununtu the same way I already explained previously.

    11) When it comes to the Boot Loader (GRUB2), as usual, make sure to install it in the MBR of sda.

    12) Restart/Re-boot your machine (don't forget to take out the LiveCD/USB) and you're done.


    The more you install, the more you read, the better. Above all, if you don't break something, you will not learn to fix it. However, I'm doing my best to prevent that moment. Hopefully you won't face any problems.

    Good luck

    Note:
    * You can do step4 and step5 before step1. I started from Step1 because it's very important step. Backing up is much more important than anything else, especially if you have important data.

    /*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*//*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*//*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/*/

    HOW TO Shrink A Partition Using GParted - Images


    Step1







    Step 2







    Step 3


    Last edited by amjjawad; December 23rd, 2010 at 04:15 PM. Reason: Updating

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    Wink Scenario 4: Dual Booting-Ubuntu is installed first & uses the entire HDD (1 HDD ONLY)

    Scenario 4: Dual Booting System - Ubuntu 10.04 is already installed, uses the entire disk and there is only ONE HDD



    Introduction
    :

    The title of this scenario said it all. Please note that this is a bit advanced approach. It's not hard if you know what you want and what are you doing.
    In general, it's recommended to install Windows "first" then Ubuntu. However, in some situations, Ubuntu is already installed and you don't want to remove it and that's why you're reading this guide. As usual, I'll do my best to keep it as simple as possible.
    Also, please note that I'll skip some basic explanations. For example, I'm not going to write about howto create a LiveCD or check MD5SUM, etc. You should know all these by now



    Plan:
    a) Prepare the HDD and allocate some space for Windows.
    b) Install Windows while Ubuntu is already installed.
    c) Make sure both Systems are up and running.



    Requirements:
    a) Ubuntu LiveCD/USB
    b) Windows XP Disk



    Steps
    1- Backup all your important data/files. Use External HDD if possible.

    2- Please, refer back to step #1.

    3- Insert the LiveCD/USB for Ubuntu and reboot.

    4- Enter BIOS and make sure your machine will boot first from CD/USB.

    5-After you'll boot from the LiveCD/USB, please run GParted (System > Administration > GParted).
    You need to do the following steps:

    a- Select /dev/sda1, Right-Click and select "Resize/Move".





    b- Resize the partition either by your mouse (move the bar to the left) or enter the new size manually. Please make sure you take what you need. DO NOT take more. In this example, I'm working on 20GB HDD. In your case, I assume that would be at least 160GB or maybe more. Make sure both Ubuntu and Windows will have enough space for both of them.
    Also note that I didn't create /home partition for this example. It's not a must but recommend.






    c- Once done, click "Apply" which is the green icon. The / (root) partition for Ubuntu will be resized.

    d- Now, you have unallocated space. You need to prepare this space for Windows Installation. Select the unallocated space, Right-Click and select "New".






    e- Because you're going to install Windows later so you need to format that new partition as "NTFS". Please, make sure it's Primary Partition. Don't worry, if you have root, home and swap partition and all of them are Primary Partitions, you still have one more left. You're allowed to have 4 Primary Partitions MAX.







    f- After that, click "Apply" and you are done.


    6- Reboot your machine and make sure you're able to login to Ubuntu. Remember what I wrote about NOT taking space more than your need.

    7- If you managed to login to Ubuntu successfully, then it's time for the next move.

    8- Insert your Windows CD and restart/reboot. Remember your BIOS settings must remain the same (boot from CD first).

    9- Start the installation process of Windows XP. Choose the NTFS partition that you created using GParted earlier.

    Note that, the installer will detect another "active partition" which is sda1 which is the root partition of Ubuntu. Once you choose to install Windows on Partition C (NTFS), it will ask you to make it the "active partition". Just press Enter and carry on. Don't worry about that at all. It's Windows thing. I'm telling you now so you know how to deal with it.

    10- Format the partition (quick format) and go on.

    11- Once Windows Installation is done, make sure you can login to Windows successfully. I suggest to restart your machine after installation, just to make sure everything is perfectly fine.

    12- If Windows is working perfectly then insert your LiveCD/USB of Ubuntu and reboot your machine.

    13- Now, we need to re-install GRUB2 to the MBR of sda which is the only HDD you have. On that HDD, there's Windows and Ubuntu installed before Windows.
    When you install Windows, the Boot Loader of Windows will overwrite the MBR so GRUB2 is no longer taking the control and you can't boot into Ubuntu.
    You need to re-install GRUB2 to the MBR of sda so that you can boot both Windows and Ubuntu using GRUB2.

    If you have another Boot Loader, skip this and install your own. Unfortunately, this guide covers only the installation of GRUB2 as it's so much powerful already.

    This is the official guide of howto Re-Install GRUB2.


    14- Applications > Accessories > Terminal
    Run this command (copy and paste it to your terminal):

    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    The output of this command will tell you which partition you used to install Ubuntu on. In this example, the partition we used to install Ubuntu on is sda1.

    15- Run these commands in Terminal:

    Code:
     sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

    Code:
     sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/ /dev/sda



    Please Note that in your case, most likely you'll have the same letters.
    However, please double check. The output of "fdisk -l" should tell you everything you need.
    If still in doubt, read the official guide.


    16- Reboot your machine

    17- You should be able to login to Ubuntu but you will not see anything about Windows.
    DO NOT panic

    18- From Ubuntu, run this command from Terminal:

    Code:
    sudo update-grub


    You should see something like this:





    19- Reboot your machine and your GRUB Menu should have both entires for Ubuntu and Windows XP.
    Please, make sure to login to both Windows and Ubuntu.

    20- If you managed to login to both Ubuntu and Windows then ... YOU ARE DONE
    Last edited by amjjawad; December 28th, 2010 at 10:24 AM. Reason: Updating ...

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