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Thread: Matplotlib 1.0.0 insallation --- How?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Question Matplotlib 1.0.0 insallation --- How?

    I have an Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit system.

    I have downloaded the latest release of NumPy (numpy-1.5.0b2.tar.gz), extracted it to

    home/Downloads/numpy-1.5.0b2/

    and then executed in Python 2.6

    setup.py install

    Unfortunately, this does not install numpy

    I have attached the output produced when I executed the above. This listing shows that there are many problems/errors in the attempted installation.

    Help on this would be appreciated --- What next?
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Beans
    828
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Matplotlib 1.0.0 insallation --- How?

    You're missing many of numpy's dependencies.
    Code:
    apt-cache show python-numpy
    Should show you the following.

    Depends: python (<< 2.7), python (>= 2.6), python-central (>= 0.6.11), libblas3gf | libblas.so.3gf | libatlas3gf-base, libc6 (>= 2.11), libgcc1 (>= 1:4.1.1), libgfortran3 (>= 4.3), liblapack3gf | liblapack.so.3gf | libatlas3gf-base

    You certainly have python, etc installed but you are clearly missing some of the blas dependencies and what not. I would try installing the missing dependencies and then try again. Of course, if the newer version of numpy has additional / newer dependencies, this still won't work until those problems are addressed as well.

    When you think about how complicated it is to update even a single library, it really makes you appreciate the work done by distros like Ubuntu, Fedora, Slackware, etc.

    BTW - I do not recommend installing the newer version of numpy as a system-wide component. Install it locally. I maintain ~/bin and ~/lib for libraries and programs that I want to update for use in my own personal work/scripts. If a program tries to use the system-wide version of numpy it may or may not work, depending on the interaction between that application and the newer library. Python libs are often safer to upgrade system-wide than C libs, but I would still install it locally, so you don't risk messing stuff up.
    Please Insert Funny Statement Here.

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