Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: REISUB vs. RSEIUB

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    Beans
    545
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    REISUB vs. RSEIUB

    Quick question. Most of us know the pattern of keys to press to force a restart on an unresponsive computer. However, I've seen two different orders recommended and I'm curious if there is any difference between the two orders from the computer's standpoint, and if so, which is better.

    I learned the "Raising Skinny Elephants Is Utterly Boring" method. Namely, hold down Alt and SysRq and then press the following patter of letters, leaving a second or two in between: RSEIUB

    The pattern I often see on these forums is REISUB.

    Which is the best? Does it matter?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    NorCal
    Beans
    1,149
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: REISUB vs. RSEIUB

    http://www.brunolinux.com/01-First_T...Elephants.html

    It shouldn't make much of a difference; as long as R is first and UB are last, it should be fine.
    Posting code? Use the [code] or [php] tags.
    I don't care, I'm still free. You can't take the sky from me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Romania
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: REISUB vs. RSEIUB

    Quote Originally Posted by stoogiebuncho View Post
    Which is the best?
    REISUB ( "Raising Elephants Is So Utterly Boring", "Reboot Even If System Utterly Broken" )

    I'm not an expert, but it sounds safer to sync the mounted filesystems (write any data buffered in memory out to disk) after all processes are terminated/killed.


    See:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_SysRq_key

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    North Dakota
    Beans
    224
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

    Re: REISUB vs. RSEIUB

    Quote Originally Posted by stoogiebuncho View Post
    I learned the "Raising Skinny Elephants Is Utterly Boring" method. Namely, hold down Alt and SysRq and then press the following patter of letters, leaving a second or two in between: RSEIUB

    The pattern I often see on these forums is REISUB.

    Which is the best? Does it matter?
    The R is the acryonym is to switch the input modes. It hasn't been needed in most of 10 years. We're already in that input mode.

    S is for sync, that is flush the cache buffers to disk. It makes no sense to do this right before E.

    E is to nicely kill all processes. (kill $pid). I is to forcibly kill all processes (kill -9 $pid)

    E and I are going to cause a lot of activity on the disk as processes close and do final writes and everything. As you can see, sync before E and I is pointless.

    U is for forcibly unmount. Unmount implies a sync operation. So now that S is really pointless. In fact, there's no difference between SU and U, so anyone that tells you "Do REISUB, not RSEIUB" is still wrong. U and SU are the same.

    B means to immediately reboot the system.

    So what do you need to type in? AltGr + Sysreq + EIUB. That's it. Nothing more. So naturally I type and teach RSEISUB. Why? "Raising Skinny Elephants Is So Utterly Boring" is something I find really easy to remember, and who cares if you're doing extra syncs or switching to an input mode you're already in?
    Search first, ask questions later!
    From Thread Tools, "Mark this thread as solved" if your problem's been solved.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Tewkesbury uk
    Beans
    7,512
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: REISUB vs. RSEIUB

    Thanks for the input, however, old thread.

    Closed
    Join us on irc at #ubuntuforums. For web chat see here

    If you believe everything you read, you better not read. ~ Japanese Proverb

    Do not read newspapers on an empty stomach ~ Russian Proverb ~ BrunoLotse

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •