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Thread: Why can't I mount my GPT drive? It shows up in fdisk...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    28

    Why can't I mount my GPT drive? It shows up in fdisk...

    I'm using Hyper-V and using physical disk pass-through to pass a physical disk to Ubuntu but I'm having problems.

    Here's my fdisk -l output:
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sdb: 2199.0 GB, 2199023255552 bytes
    256 heads, 63 sectors/track, 266305 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16128 * 512 = 8257536 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1      266306  2147483647+  ee  GPT
    However, the special device /dev/sdb1 doesn't exist so I can't mount it.

    Is this normal for GPT drives? Am I doing something wrong?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    ::1
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    Re: Why can't I mount my GPT drive? It shows up in fdisk...

    What have you tried to mount the partition? And what was the result?

    And: is this the full 'sudo fdisk -l' output?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
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    3,195

    Re: Why can't I mount my GPT drive? It shows up in fdisk...

    The Linux fdisk utility only shows the protective MBR, which is a data structure designed to protect GPT disks from damage by GPT-unaware tools. The real partitions on the disk can't be identified by fdisk; you'll need to use GPT fdisk (aka gdisk), an fdisk-like tool; or a libparted-based program, such as the text-based GNU Parted or the GUI GParted.

    If /dev/sdb1 doesn't exist, then chances are that either the disk has a GUID Partition Table defined but it contains no partitions, or that the first partition on the disk has a number other than 1. (This is perfectly legal, in both MBR and GPT.) Either look at the disk with gdisk, parted, or some other GPT-aware tool, or type "ls /dev/sdb*" to see all the partitions that the kernel recognizes.

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