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Thread: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Beans
    128
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    I went further with less step

    Install QT4
    $ sudo apt-get install libqt4-core lib-qt4-dev

    Download RPM
    $ wget http://webpages.charter.net/qspencer....10-1.i386.rpm

    Convert into .deb
    $ sudo dpkg -d octave-workshop-0.10-1.i386.rpm

    Install it
    $ sudo dpkg -i octave-workshop-0.10-1.i386.deb

    Then try it:
    $ octave-workshop

    You get libtermcap error --> search for it ($ locate libtermcap) --> it only changes name so make a symbolic link
    $ sudo ln -s /usr/lib/libtermcap.so /usr/lib/libtermcap.so.2

    Now, I'm stuck with liboctinterp.so
    octave-workshop: error while loading shared libraries: liboctinterp.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
    But I've of course the liboctinterp.so in /usr/lib/octave-2.1.73/liboctinterp.so I guess the binary is looking at th wrong place... don't know how to correct this. I've put symbolic link everywhere... nope

    Pffff

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Beans
    8

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    I am very interested in IFEFFIT software, but I don't know how to install this soft ware in my computer. Here is a link for this
    http://cars9.uchicago.edu/ifeffit/download.html

    Can someone help me to install it? thanks a lot!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Beans
    128
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    Just follow the instructions here :
    http://cars9.uchicago.edu/ifeffit/src/INSTALL

    Rmq: You'll need that first
    Code:
    $ sudo apt-get install build-essential
    Basically, when you get source in .tar.gz format:
    1) decompress the archive and enter the new directory
    Code:
    $ tar -xzvf xxxx.tar.gz
    $ cd xxxx
    2) configure the building and installation
    Code:
    $ ./configure
    You should get messages telling if it is OK or not. In that last case, look at the problem and try to correct it by installing the missing software via apt-get. For instance, if it tells you that yyyyy is missing, then look for it:
    Code:
    $ apt-cache search yyyyy
    You'll get some answer(s) (if not then look in the forum), let's say abcdef. Then install it via
    Code:
    $ sudo apt-get install abcdef
    and start point 2 again.

    3) When it finished ok, you can build the program:
    Code:
    $ make
    Here also, you'll get a lot of messages, if there is a problem, look in the forum. At the end, you'll get a binary

    4) Install the binary
    Code:
    $ sudo make install
    And everything should be working and located at the right place (you can safely remove xxxx.tar.gz and the directory xxxx). To execute, type the name of the program.

    Rmq: there is always (at least) one problem when installing from source... always look for a .deb first
    Last edited by Toufik; January 9th, 2007 at 05:38 PM.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Beans
    8

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    thanks for your instruction. But I still got a problem, that is, after configure, it informs an error as following:
    ===
    === ifeffit 1.2.8 Configuration Results:
    === linking to PGPLOT with: /home/htcuong/Desktop/ifeffit-1.2.8/src/pgstub/libnopgplot.a
    ===
    === could not find TERMCAP Libraries : 'make' will fail.
    ===
    === Please set TERMCAP_LIB in src/cmdline/Makefile or use the
    === --termcap-link argument before running make

    Do you know what it is? thanks

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Beans
    128
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    termcap is now replaced by ncurses but I don't know which packages exactly. Try to install some packages containing ncurses (probably ncurses-base, ncurses-bin and ncurses-term)

    If you experience problem with an installation: open a new forum! You'll get more help with a precise title!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Beans
    513

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Pullman View Post
    Zhu3D is a very nice opengl surface plotter

    http://www.kde-apps.org/content/show.php?content=43071

    I had to compile it (it isn't in the repository), but it wasn't troublesome.
    Does anyone know of a program like this (that support implict 3d plots) for gnome?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    India
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    RLPLot is a great WYSIWYG plotting software with a shallow learning curve. Available in the repos and great for publication quality graphs.
    Linux User #398099 | Ubuntu User #11310 | Karmic Koala

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    1 AU from sun
    Beans
    80
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    many astronomical codes that can be run on ubuntu can be found here
    mostly harmless
    8)
    GS d- s+: a-- C++ UL P L++ E--- W++ N o K w+ O- M- V- PS- PE- Y+ PGP t+ 5++ X++ R+ tv++ b++++ DI- D++G e+++ h-- r-- y-

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Beans
    147
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    Quote Originally Posted by Barrakketh View Post
    You could consider giving Kile a try for LaTeX. It's rather nice.
    TeXmaker is nice too. I hear it's from the guy who started the Kile project. There are some differences, but Texmaker loads a--lot--faster.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Beans
    13

    Re: Scientific Software options for Ubuntu

    gretl is a great package for econometrics and time series analysis. It also has some simple tools for finding p-values and doing elementary t-tests etc. It has a very easy-to-use GUI as well as a command line interface, it is easy (from what i've heard) to extend with scripts, and it can send it's data to R.

    It produces plots with Gnuplot, and you can get it's output in latex format.

    http://gretl.sourceforge.net/

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