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Thread: Game Booster?

  1. #1
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    Game Booster?

    I have the HP mini 311 with ubuntu 10.04 newly installed. I am fresh to the ubuntu world, but I do have compiz installed and the mac4lin theme with docky on the bottom. I am using Wine to run the games including starcraft Broodwar and it runs really choppy. Where before I switched to ubuntu windows 7 ran starcraft, and world of warcraft at amazing speed. I was wondering if there is a way to turn off effects from the desktop when running a full screen application so that way it gets more power to the processor. I used Game Booster by IO Bit and that ran wonders on the laptop.

    System Specs

    Intel Atom - 1.67 GHZ
    Nvidia Ion
    3 GB Ram
    320 GB HDD

  2. #2
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    Re: Game Booster?

    The only way I can think of feasible turning off effect would be write a bash script that you launch with the game. I don't know though there maybe someway to do it with wine.
    KDE SC 4.4

  3. #3
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    Re: Game Booster?

    Quote Originally Posted by -humanaut- View Post
    The only way I can think of feasible turning off effect would be write a bash script that you launch with the game. I don't know though there maybe someway to do it with wine.
    do you know of any easy bash script that i could make a button for on the desktop or something for running games? so when I turn the game off I can switch back to normal mode?

  4. #4
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    Re: Game Booster?

    I'd try googling for one I'm sure something exist out there that would be easy to implement but I'm not sure try google if you can't find anything Ill help you write a bash script.
    KDE SC 4.4

  5. #5
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    Re: Game Booster?

    I have actually scoured the internet and tried out two or three bashes that are either

    1- to have an on and off when running an app but running terminal and typing in the name of the script and then the title of the game


    2-an auto on and off of all features with a click of a desktop icon.

    The issue I had is when I followed the instruction it froze my laptop disabled half of the main functions of the os and I had to reboot the laptop. After the laptop reboots the system runs perfect again. I was hoping someone had already made a program for it. I know that many computer nerds like myself a huge gamers and I don't want to have to be tethered to my quad core desktop all the time for lan parties

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Re: Game Booster?

    You could setup another user-account with all the effects disabled and just use it for gaming. Thatd be the simplest solution
    KDE SC 4.4

  7. #7
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    Smile Re: Game Booster?

    I know this is an old thread but there IS actually a solution to your problem. Ubuntu generally uses less resources than Windows 7 does even with Gamebooster on. Still running games with Wine is way choppier so the problem isn't in the background processes but actually in Wine itself.
    Most of the games for Windows are made with DirectX. This DirectX thing runs only on Windows so its wine's job to emulate it. Here lyes your problem. Running DirectX on Wine is choppier because things are not well optimized.

    The solution:

    Some games (especially those that run on Mac too) support not only DirectX but OpenGL.
    (Because its Mac's alternative to DirectX). The good thing is that OpenGL runs natively on Linux (not like DirectX) and those games that support it can usually be set (in the game's settings or some config files) to use OpenGL instead of DirectX which result's in better performance.

    So, let me give you a real world example.

    Today I installed World of Warcraft on my Xubuntu 12. The first time I played it, it ran really choppy. It was later when I remembered that WoW runs on DirectX by default so I added the line
    SET gxApi "opengl"

    to WTF/config.wtf and the next time I ran the game, the
    performance was similar to the one I had with Windows before
    I switched to Linux (As a head-up I think that it might be
    even better but as it was long time ago I am not completely
    sure). The only downside I got with this change is that some
    of the Video options are not available and automatically set to
    lowest. Those are:
    Shadow quality
    Liquid Detail
    Sunshafts
    Ground clutter (with the exception that the max here is fair,
    not low).
    Everything other is maxed and the game is running smoothly. As
    a conclusion switching to OpenGL is worth it!



    If switching to OpenGL doesn't bring the performance to
    a Windows-like level, then you should check if you have installed
    the binary blob for your graphics card (this means - the driver)
    Some Linux distros don't install it automatically because the
    drivers for all of the famous graphic cards are closed source
    which is against Linux's philosophy. You should either check
    Additional Drivers on Ubuntu or find and install the compiler
    manually from the manufacturer's website.

    At last, if all of the above methods can't help you and you are
    sure it is the operating system's resource usage, then you should
    find a lighter alternative for the applications that your
    system uses.
    For example, switching to OpenBox and LXDE can free up some
    precious RAM
    Thunar is a file manager which is famous for its lightness.

    You can also clean up your system with the following tools
    Bleachbit - cache and temporary files
    GConf Cleaner - unused registry stuff

    Reducing the swappiness is also a good practise

    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/sysctl.conf
    Then find the line:

    Code:
    vm.swappiness=SomeValueHere
    and change it to

    Code:
    vm.swappiness=10
    Be free to experiment with values from 0 to 100. The best option
    will vary depending on how much RAM you have but 10 is good for
    most configurations as written here:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq

    While I was searching for more ways to improve game performance
    on Linux I found this old and rusty thread and I thought that
    I should give an appropriate answer to it as such there was not.

    That's all folks!

    External Links:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectX
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenGL
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_blob
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swappiness
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lxde
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Openbox
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunar
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BleachBit
    http://www.ghacks.net/2010/09/21/cle...gconf-cleaner/

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