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Thread: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Aloha!

    9.10 Karmic Koala

    Have a spare 200gb drive so stuck it in alongside my primary

    It wants my sudo pass to mount it each reboot

    Can I have it auto mount without the sudo each time? Store the sudo for the mount I mean.

    Thanks for your time!
    John
    Last edited by johnuk; March 24th, 2010 at 12:11 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    2,578
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Maunt the drive automatically with system startup by including it in the configuration file /etc/fstab.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    3

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Quote Originally Posted by vanadium View Post
    Maunt the drive automatically with system startup by including it in the configuration file /etc/fstab.
    and this sort of thing is why linux is not spreading to the masses. any system changes are difficult to manage and before you rabid fanboys pounce, most people do not want to have to edit anything just to auto-mount a drive, they are not going to spend the time to learn linux nor are they going to hire someone to do it for them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    73

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Thanks Vanadium, I was going to say it earlier but I haven't got round to working out precisely what I need to add to fstab.

    Moi is correct, but then, I also didn't make out that I needed any extra help in my original post.

    To be fair, a quick google search has pulled up a bunch of pages about automounting drive - which I should have searched for first.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    43

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Was one of those pages here?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    73

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    No, but thanks for the link!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    73

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    I tried following this http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/mountlinux

    The only mistake I can think of is that I used a lowercase j for John in my username to set up the permissions, when it's John under users and groups - my name that is, my login is john

    On restarting, I got a bunch of logical partition errors and then the disk entirely disappeared from the GUI

    Cut the line out of fstab, errors disappeared, disk reappears in GUI
    Last edited by johnuk; March 25th, 2010 at 06:52 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    5,418

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    Why not post the output of the following command:

    Open Terminal
    Type sudo blkid -c /dev/null

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    73

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    /dev/sda1: UUID="9e60a79b-a0c5-4059-bf6d-dff9101f2636" TYPE="ext4" <----- main disc
    /dev/sda5: UUID="baa2cd21-c15e-4619-8d19-0de3477df105" TYPE="swap" <----- main disc
    /dev/sdb1: UUID="0953fd04-ca7a-4ec7-bfca-0fd0ace628bb" TYPE="ext2" <----- this is the spare 200gb drive

    The UUID and type are both what I used in fstab on my first attempt.

    Could someone explain the ext# file systems. I know what FAT / NTFS & swap are about, but why does Linux have these ext# (extension, I understand that, not the number) and is there any logic behind the number assigned or difference in the actual file system? For example, could I have two drives or partitions with the same ext#?

    Thanks for the help amigos

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    2,578
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Auto mount extra HD on boot?

    * Create a mount point for the drive
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /mnt/sdb1
    * open the file /etc/fstab for editing with root permissions
    Code:
    gksudo gedit /etc/fstab
    (or: sudo nano /etc/fstab if you want to edit using nano)
    * Add a line for your sdb1. First field is the drive, references by its UUID, second field = mount point, third field is file system, fourth field is options, fifth field is no more used (leave it 0) 6th field specifies checking or not (make it 2 - in second order after the system drives)
    Code:
    UUID="0953fd04-ca7a-4ec7-bfca-0fd0ace628bb" /mnt/sdb1 ext2 defaults 0 2
    Save the file and exit

    * perform the mount. There should not be any output from the following command. Otherwise, there is an error.
    Code:
    sudo mount -a
    If no error, the drive is mounted and can be found in /mnt/sdb1.

    * By default, only root can write to /mnt/sdb1 (the root partition of the drive. If you want to change that, you can use nautilus with root permissions: "gksudo nautilus". With right-click, properties, you can change permissions of the /mnt/sdb1 if needed. Existing directories will keep their permissions.

    ext2, ext3 and ext4 are different versions of the ext filing system of linux. ext4 is the most recent version, which has become the default for the latest Ubuntu.

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