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Thread: Accessing my inlaws Ubuntu Machine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Beans
    138
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

    Accessing my inlaws Ubuntu Machine

    I installed ubuntu on my inlaws machine, they seem to enjoy it. Occasionally when we visit, 1 hour away, I am being asked to fix something, like install flash or something... What would be the best way to remote access that machine from my house to perform these tasks? Tutorials on this stuff is a biiig help....


    Thanks all!

    -Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    619

    Re: Accessing my inlaws Ubuntu Machine

    If you set up their router with port forwarding then ssh is very good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Peterborough, Uk
    Beans
    630
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal

    Re: Accessing my inlaws Ubuntu Machine

    Remote Desktop

    But good luck with that. I've never been successful connecting to anyone on a WAN.

    I've been talking to a mate on irc who's on ubuntu.. followed all the procedures and still no luck. Obviously we are both behind a router but it must be possible otherwise no-one would ever get hacked.

    Plus... Remote support on windows always work without needing to faff about in your router.

    Unless that's our "My Wings are like a shield of steel" cloak of invincibility ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Beans
    425

    Re: Accessing my inlaws Ubuntu Machine

    Quote Originally Posted by Swagman View Post
    I've been talking to a mate on irc who's on ubuntu.. followed all the procedures and still no luck. Obviously we are both behind a router but it must be possible otherwise no-one would ever get hacked.
    Once the router is listening on a port and forwarding it properly, and the ISP is allowing incoming connections to the selected port, it should be good to go.

    There are a number of ports I recommend to no leave open, and the default ssh port number 22 is one of them. In the case of ssh, lots of "kiddies" are trying to crack them, usually by password dictionary attacks. Even if you use strong passwords and/or keys, this can still waste some traffic and flood logs (annoying when you need to find details about some issue).

    ISPs may be blocking 22 and 23 for reasons like this.

    My point is, pick a non-standard port for ssh and configure the router to forward that port number to the computer's port 22 (or even change that, too, just to be sure). Then you use the -p option on ssh/scp to select the port.

    It's still possible for the ISP to be blocking all incoming TCP connections. I don't know of any doing that, but there might be some. Also be sure your outgoing connections are getting through.

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