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Thread: Gnome 2.26 (jaunty default) file sharing preferences

  1. #1
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    Arrow Gnome 2.26 (jaunty default) file sharing preferences

    Hello all,

    According to these release notes file sharing has been made easier in 2.26.

    It should be easy to share files over LAN, HTTP and Bluetooth.
    Can anyone explain to me how to share files or folders over HTTP using Gnomes built-in capabilities?

    Eternal gratitude guaranteed!

    Last edited by Psychopump; May 20th, 2009 at 04:53 PM. Reason: added topic subscription

  2. #2
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    Re: Gnome 2.26 (jaunty default) file sharing preferences

    $ sudo apt-get install gnome-user-share

    And then navigate to "System" > "Preferences" > "Personal File Sharing"

  3. #3
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    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

    Re: Gnome 2.26 (jaunty default) file sharing preferences

    Quote Originally Posted by urmomsgoat View Post
    $ sudo apt-get install gnome-user-share

    And then navigate to "System" > "Preferences" > "Personal File Sharing"
    Thanks for your reply!
    I installed gnome-user-share and it allows me to specify whether or not I want to share public folders over a network, but how do I allow a remote user (in a different country, using HTTP or FTP) to access the files?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Xubuntu

    Re: Gnome 2.26 (jaunty default) file sharing preferences

    To some extent, it depends on the protocol you want to use and how secure you want to be?

    gnome-user-share is described as "User level public file sharing via WebDAV or ObexFTP".

    The 'traditional' way of file sharing that I learned is to set up NFS shares if all machines are Linux-based and Samba shares if there are Windows machines involved anywhere. A particular folder can operate as both an NFS share & a Samba share if necessary.

    If you want to go outside the local network that is behind your router, you most definitely want a secure protocol. Scp & Sftp are secure methods of ftp transfer.

    Personally I run Openssh server/client combinations across all shares and setup nfs shares within that secure environment. Works from London to Sydney ok?!! You will need to look at fixed ip addresses if connecting remotely.

    Do a search of these forums (& Google if necessary for some of the key terms mentioned here. There is a heap of useful info available. There are lots of options on this matter so you need to be quite specific about what you want to achieve in order to get specific help about how to do it.

    Cheers,
    Rhodry
    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
    it's about learning to dance in the rain.

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