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Thread: How many kernels does Ubuntu need?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Salt Lake City
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    195
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    How many kernels does Ubuntu need?

    Running Ubuntu 8.04 on my laptop and i noticed there is a new kernel in software updates. I already have 2 on my boot menu 2.6.24-19 and 2.6.24-23 and this new one 2.6.24-24 which I havn't installed is recommended. Am I supposed to install all these kernels everytime an update presents itself? I don't want a whole bunch of them stacked up like cordwood taking up space for no reason. How many should I keep andd how do i get rid of the one's i don't want.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
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    Hidden!

    Re: How many kernels does Ubuntu need?

    Updating to new kernels opens up new features for your computer, should you choose to install them. However, they are completely optional.

    To remove old kernels, simple open synaptic and mark the old kernels for removal. They will remove themselves from the menu list automatically.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Central CA
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    459
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: How many kernels does Ubuntu need?

    You only need one kernel, but it's nice to have the last version available in case something's changed in the most recent one that affects on or more of your programs. It doesn't happen often, but it does.

    Generally, kernel updates solve security issues (holes or vulnerabilities) and improve the operation of the whole system, so I'd update.

    Oh, removing old ones, apparently, are done by removing the kernel (linux-image-2.6.xx-xx-xxx) from synaptic and then running
    Code:
    sudo update-grub

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Salt Lake City
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    195
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    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: How many kernels does Ubuntu need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dngrsone View Post
    You only need one kernel, but it's nice to have the last version available in case something's changed in the most recent one that affects on or more of your programs. It doesn't happen often, but it does.

    Generally, kernel updates solve security issues (holes or vulnerabilities) and improve the operation of the whole system, so I'd update.

    Oh, removing old ones, apparently, are done by removing the kernel (linux-image-2.6.xx-xx-xxx) from synaptic and then running
    Code:
    sudo update-grub
    Tha to both of you for the quick replies, and I think I will keep one kernel as a backup and dump the rest.

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