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Thread: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    258

    Exclamation Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    I just installed Tor and Privoxy and the Torbutton addon for Firefox. The FAQ said to use 127.0.0.1 for the localhost IP in the /etc/privoxy/config file, which didn't work. I changed it to localhost; no change. In Firfox I've changed the Network settings from Auto Detect to Use System Settings to Manual. No dice. I keep getting a Page Load error or Proxy Server Refused Connection // Firefox is configured to use a proxy server that is refusing connections.

    Here's my /etc/privoxyconfig, in case that's needed:

    Code:
    #        Sample Configuration File for Privoxy
    #
    #  Id: config,v
    #
    #  Copyright (C) 2001-2008 Privoxy Developers http://www.privoxy.org/
    #
    ####################################################################
    #                                                                  #
    #                      Table of Contents                           #
    #                                                                  #
    #        I. INTRODUCTION                                           #
    #       II. FORMAT OF THE CONFIGURATION FILE                       #
    #                                                                  #
    #        1. LOCAL SET-UP DOCUMENTATION                             #
    #        2. CONFIGURATION AND LOG FILE LOCATIONS                   #
    #        3. DEBUGGING                                              #
    #        4. ACCESS CONTROL AND SECURITY                            #
    #        5. FORWARDING                                             #
    #        6. WINDOWS GUI OPTIONS                                    #
    #                                                                  #
    ####################################################################
    #
    #
    #  I. INTRODUCTION
    #   ===============
    #
    #  This file holds Privoxy's main configuration. Privoxy detects
    #  configuration changes automatically, so you don't have to restart
    #  it unless you want to load a different configuration file.
    #
    #  The configuration will be reloaded with the first request after
    #  the change was done, this request itself will still use the old
    #  configuration, though. In other words: it takes two requests before
    #  you see the result of your changes.  Requests that are dropped due
    #  to ACL don't trigger reloads.
    #
    #  When starting Privoxy on Unix systems, give the location of this
    #  file as last argument. On Windows systems, Privoxy will look for
    #  this file with the name 'config.txt' in the current working directory
    #  of the Privoxy process.
    #
    #
    #  II. FORMAT OF THE CONFIGURATION FILE
    #  ====================================
    #
    #  Configuration lines consist of an initial keyword followed by a
    #  list of values, all separated by whitespace (any number of spaces
    #  or tabs). For example,
    #
    #  actionsfile default.action
    #
    #  Indicates that the actionsfile is named 'default.action'.
    #
    #  The '#' indicates a comment. Any part of a line following a '#'
    #  is ignored, except if the '#' is preceded by a '\'.
    #
    #  Thus, by placing a # at the start of an existing configuration
    #  line, you can make it a comment and it will be treated as if it
    #  weren't there. This is called "commenting out" an option and can
    #  be useful. Removing the # again is called "uncommenting".
    #
    #  Note that commenting out an option and leaving it at its default
    #  are two completely different things! Most options behave very
    #  differently when unset.  See the "Effect if unset" explanation in
    #  each option's description for details.
    #
    #  Long lines can be continued on the next line by using a `\' as the
    #  last character.
    #
    #
    #
    #  1. LOCAL SET-UP DOCUMENTATION
    #  ==============================
    #
    #  If you intend to operate Privoxy for more users than just yourself,
    #  it might be a good idea to let them know how to reach you, what
    #  you block and why you do that, your policies, etc.
    #
    #
    #
    #  1.1. user-manual
    #  =================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Location of the Privoxy User Manual.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      A fully qualified URI
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      http://www.privoxy.org/version/user-manual/ will be used,
    #      where version is the Privoxy version.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The User Manual URI is the single best source of information on
    #      Privoxy, and is used for help links from some of the internal
    #      CGI pages. The manual itself is normally packaged with the
    #      binary distributions, so you probably want to set this to a
    #      locally installed copy.
    #
    #      Examples:
    #
    #      The best all purpose solution is simply to put the full local
    #      PATH to where the User Manual is located:
    #
    #        user-manual  /usr/share/doc/privoxy/user-manual
    #
    #
    #      The User Manual is then available to anyone with
    #      access to Privoxy, by following the built-in URL:
    #      http://config.privoxy.org/user-manual/ (or the shortcut:
    #      http://p.p/user-manual/).
    #
    #      If the documentation is not on the local system, it can be
    #      accessed from a remote server, as:
    #
    #        user-manual  http://example.com/privoxy/user-manual/
    #
    #
    #      WARNING!!!
    #
    #          If set, this option should be the first option in the config
    #          file, because it is used while the config file is being read.
    #
    user-manual /usr/share/doc/privoxy/user-manual
    #
    #
    #  1.2. trust-info-url
    #  ====================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      A URL to be displayed in the error page that users will see if
    #      access to an untrusted page is denied.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      URL
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Two example URLs are provided
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No links are displayed on the "untrusted" error page.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The value of this option only matters if the experimental trust
    #      mechanism has been activated. (See trustfile below.)
    #
    #      If you use the trust mechanism, it is a good idea to write
    #      up some on-line documentation about your trust policy and to
    #      specify the URL(s) here. Use multiple times for multiple URLs.
    #
    #      The URL(s) should be added to the trustfile as well, so users
    #      don't end up locked out from the information on why they were
    #      locked out in the first place!
    #
    #trust-info-url  http://www.example.com/why_we_block.html
    #trust-info-url  http://www.example.com/what_we_allow.html
    #
    #
    #  1.3. admin-address
    #  ===================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      An email address to reach the Privoxy administrator.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Email address
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No email address is displayed on error pages and the CGI user
    #      interface.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      If both admin-address and proxy-info-url are unset, the whole
    #      "Local Privoxy Support" box on all generated pages will not
    #      be shown.
    #
    #admin-address privoxy-admin@example.com
    #
    #
    #  1.4. proxy-info-url
    #  ====================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      A URL to documentation about the local Privoxy setup,
    #      configuration or policies.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      URL
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No link to local documentation is displayed on error pages and
    #      the CGI user interface.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      If both admin-address and proxy-info-url are unset, the whole
    #      "Local Privoxy Support" box on all generated pages will not
    #      be shown.
    #
    #      This URL shouldn't be blocked ;-)
    #
    #proxy-info-url http://www.example.com/proxy-service.html
    #
    #
    #  2. CONFIGURATION AND LOG FILE LOCATIONS
    #  ========================================
    #
    #  Privoxy can (and normally does) use a number of other files for
    #  additional configuration, help and logging. This section of the
    #  configuration file tells Privoxy where to find those other files.
    #
    #  The user running Privoxy, must have read permission for all
    #  configuration files, and write permission to any files that would
    #  be modified, such as log files and actions files.
    #
    #
    #
    #  2.1. confdir
    #  =============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The directory where the other configuration files are located.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Path name
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      /etc/privoxy (Unix) or Privoxy installation dir (Windows)
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Mandatory
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      No trailing "/", please.
    #
    confdir /etc/privoxy
    #
    #
    #  2.2. templdir
    #  ==============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      An alternative directory where the templates are loaded from.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Path name
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The templates are assumed to be located in confdir/template.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Privoxy's original templates are usually overwritten with each
    #      update. Use this option to relocate customized templates that
    #      should be kept. As template variables might change between
    #      updates, you shouldn't expect templates to work with Privoxy
    #      releases other than the one they were part of, though.
    #
    #templdir .
    #
    #
    #  2.3. logdir
    #  ============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The directory where all logging takes place (i.e. where logfile
    #      and jarfile are located).
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Path name
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      /var/log/privoxy (Unix) or Privoxy installation dir (Windows)
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Mandatory
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      No trailing "/", please.
    #
    logdir /var/log/privoxy
    #
    #
    #  2.4. actionsfile
    #  =================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The actions file(s) to use
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Complete file name, relative to confdir
    #
    #  Default values:
    #
    #        standard.action     # Internal purposes, no editing recommended
    #
    #        default.action      # Main actions file
    #
    #        user.action         # User customizations
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No actions are taken at all. More or less neutral proxying.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Multiple actionsfile lines are permitted, and are in fact
    #      recommended!
    #
    #      The default values include standard.action, which is used
    #      for internal purposes and should be loaded, default.action,
    #      which is the "main" actions file maintained by the developers,
    #      and user.action, where you can make your personal additions.
    #
    #      Actions files contain all the per site and per URL configuration
    #      for ad blocking, cookie management, privacy considerations,
    #      etc. There is no point in using Privoxy without at least one
    #      actions file.
    #
    #      Note that since Privoxy 3.0.7, the complete filename, including
    #      the ".action" extension has to be specified. The syntax change
    #      was necessary to be consistent with the other file options and
    #      to allow previously forbidden characters.
    #
    actionsfile standard.action  # Internal purpose, recommended
    actionsfile global.action    # Global default setting for all sites
    actionsfile default.action   # Main actions file
    actionsfile user.action      # User customizations
    #
    #
    #  2.5. filterfile
    #  ================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The filter file(s) to use
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      File name, relative to confdir
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      default.filter (Unix) or default.filter.txt (Windows)
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No textual content filtering takes place, i.e. all +filter{name}
    #      actions in the actions files are turned neutral.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Multiple filterfile lines are permitted.
    #
    #      The filter files contain content modification rules that use
    #      regular expressions. These rules permit powerful changes on the
    #      content of Web pages, and optionally the headers as well, e.g.,
    #      you could try to disable your favorite JavaScript annoyances,
    #      re-write the actual displayed text, or just have some fun
    #      playing buzzword bingo with web pages.
    #
    #      The +filter{name} actions rely on the relevant filter (name)
    #      to be defined in a filter file!
    #
    #      A pre-defined filter file called default.filter that contains a
    #      number of useful filters for common problems is included in the
    #      distribution. See the section on the filter action for a list.
    #
    #      It is recommended to place any locally adapted filters into a
    #      separate file, such as user.filter.
    #
    filterfile default.filter
    #filterfile user.filter      # User customizations
    #
    #
    #  2.6. logfile
    #  =============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The log file to use
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      File name, relative to logdir
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset (commented out). When activated: logfile (Unix) or
    #      privoxy.log (Windows).
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      No logfile is written.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The logfile is where all logging and error messages are
    #      written. The level of detail and number of messages are set with
    #      the debug option (see below).  The logfile can be useful for
    #      tracking down a problem with Privoxy (e.g., it's not blocking
    #      an ad you think it should block) and it can help you to monitor
    #      what your browser is doing.
    #
    #      Depending on the debug options below, the logfile may be a
    #      privacy risk if third parties can get access to it. As most
    #      users will never look at it, Privoxy 3.0.7 and later only log
    #      fatal errors by default.
    #
    #      For most troubleshooting purposes, you will have to change that,
    #      please refer to the debugging section for details.
    #
    #      Your logfile will grow indefinitely, and you will probably
    #      want to periodically remove it. On Unix systems, you can do
    #      this with a cron job (see "man cron"). For Red Hat based Linux
    #      distributions, a logrotate script has been included.
    #
    #      Any log files must be writable by whatever user Privoxy is
    #      being run as (on Unix, default user id is "privoxy").
    #
    logfile logfile
    #
    #
    #  2.7. jarfile
    #  =============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The file to store intercepted cookies in
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      File name, relative to logdir
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset (commented out). When activated: jarfile (Unix) or
    #      privoxy.jar (Windows).
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Intercepted cookies are not stored in a dedicated log file.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The jarfile may grow to ridiculous sizes over time.
    #
    #      If debug 8 (show header parsing) is enabled, cookies are also
    #      written to the logfile with the rest of the headers. Therefore
    #      this option isn't very useful and may be removed in future
    #      releases. Please report to the developers if you are still
    #      using it.
    #
    #jarfile jarfile
    #
    #
    #  2.8. trustfile
    #  ===============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The name of the trust file to use
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      File name, relative to confdir
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset (commented out). When activated: trust (Unix) or trust.txt
    #      (Windows)
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The entire trust mechanism is disabled.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The trust mechanism is an experimental feature for building
    #      white-lists and should be used with care. It is NOT recommended
    #      for the casual user.
    #
    #      If you specify a trust file, Privoxy will only allow access to
    #      sites that are specified in the trustfile. Sites can be listed
    #      in one of two ways:
    #
    #      Prepending a ~ character limits access to this site only (and
    #      any sub-paths within this site), e.g. ~www.example.com allows
    #      access to ~www.example.com/ features/news.html, etc.
    #
    #      Or, you can designate sites as trusted referrers, by prepending
    #      the name with a + character. The effect is that access to
    #      untrusted sites will be granted -- but only if a link from
    #      this trusted referrer was used to get there. The link target
    #      will then be added to the "trustfile" so that future, direct
    #      accesses will be granted. Sites added via this mechanism do
    #      not become trusted referrers themselves (i.e. they are added
    #      with a ~ designation). There is a limit of 512 such entries,
    #      after which new entries will not be made.
    #
    #      If you use the + operator in the trust file, it may grow
    #      considerably over time.
    #
    #      It is recommended that Privoxy be compiled with the
    #      --disable-force, --disable-toggle and --disable-editor options,
    #      if this feature is to be used.
    #
    #      Possible applications include limiting Internet access for
    #      children.
    #
    #trustfile trust
    #
    #
    #  3. DEBUGGING
    #  =============
    #
    #  These options are mainly useful when tracing a problem. Note that
    #  you might also want to invoke Privoxy with the --no-daemon command
    #  line option when debugging.
    #
    #
    #
    #  3.1. debug
    #  ===========
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Key values that determine what information gets logged.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Integer values
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0 (i.e.: only fatal errors (that cause Privoxy to exit) are logged)
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Default value is used (see above).
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      The available debug levels are:
    #
    #        debug         1 # log each request destination (and the crunch reason if Privoxy intercepted the request)
    #        debug         2 # show each connection status
    #        debug         4 # show I/O status
    #        debug         8 # show header parsing
    #        debug        16 # log all data written to the network into the logfile
    #        debug        32 # debug force feature
    #        debug        64 # debug regular expression filters
    #        debug       128 # debug redirects
    #        debug       256 # debug GIF de-animation
    #        debug       512 # Common Log Format
    #        debug      1024 # Unused
    #        debug      2048 # CGI user interface
    #        debug      4096 # Startup banner and warnings.
    #        debug      8192 # Non-fatal errors
    #
    #
    #      To select multiple debug levels, you can either add them or
    #      use multiple debug lines.
    #
    #      A debug level of 1 is informative because it will show you each
    #      request as it happens. 1, 4096 and 8192 are recommended so that
    #      you will notice when things go wrong. The other levels are
    #      probably only of interest if you are hunting down a specific
    #      problem. They can produce a hell of an output (especially 16).
    #
    #      Privoxy used to ship with the debug levels recommended above
    #      enabled by default, but due to privacy concerns 3.0.7 and later
    #      are configured to only log fatal errors.
    #
    #      If you are used to the more verbose settings, simply enable
    #      the debug lines below again.
    #
    #      If you want to use pure CLF (Common Log Format), you should set
    #      "debug 512" ONLY and not enable anything else.
    #
    #      Privoxy has a hard-coded limit for the length of log messages. If
    #      it's reached, messages are logged truncated and marked with
    #      "... [too long, truncated]".
    #
    #      Please don't file any support requests without trying to
    #      reproduce the problem with increased debug level first. Once
    #      you read the log messages, you may even be able to solve the
    #      problem on your own.
    #
    #debug      1 # log each request destination (and the crunch reason if Privoxy intercepted the request)
    #debug   4096 # Startup banner and warnings
    #debug   8192 # Non-fatal errors
    #
    #
    #  3.2. single-threaded
    #  =====================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether to run only one server thread.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      None
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Multi-threaded (or, where unavailable: forked) operation,
    #      i.e. the ability to serve multiple requests simultaneously.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      This option is only there for debugging purposes. It will
    #      drastically reduce performance.
    #
    #single-threaded
    #
    #
    #  3.3. hostname
    #  ==============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The hostname shown on the CGI pages.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Text
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The hostname provided by the operating system is used.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      On some misconfigured systems resolving the hostname fails or
    #      takes too much time and slows Privoxy down. Setting a fixed
    #      hostname works around the problem.
    #
    #      In other circumstances it might be desirable to show a hostname
    #      other than the one returned by the operating system. For example
    #      if the system has several different hostnames and you don't
    #      want to use the first one.
    #
    #      Note that Privoxy does not validate the specified hostname value.
    #
    #hostname hostname.example.org
    #
    #
    #  4. ACCESS CONTROL AND SECURITY
    #  ===============================
    #
    #  This section of the config file controls the security-relevant
    #  aspects of Privoxy's configuration.
    #
    #
    #
    #  4.1. listen-address
    #  ====================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      The IP address and TCP port on which Privoxy will listen for
    #      client requests.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      [IP-Address]:Port
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      127.0.0.1:8118
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Bind to 127.0.0.1 (localhost), port 8118. This is suitable and
    #      recommended for home users who run Privoxy on the same machine
    #      as their browser.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      You will need to configure your browser(s) to this proxy address
    #      and port.
    #
    #      If you already have another service running on port 8118, or
    #      if you want to serve requests from other machines (e.g. on your
    #      local network) as well, you will need to override the default.
    #
    #      If you leave out the IP address, Privoxy will bind to all
    #      interfaces (addresses) on your machine and may become reachable
    #      from the Internet. In that case, consider using access control
    #      lists (ACL's, see below), and/or a firewall.
    #
    #      If you open Privoxy to untrusted users, you will also
    #      want to make sure that the following actions are disabled:
    #      enable-edit-actions and enable-remote-toggle
    #
    #  Example:
    #
    #      Suppose you are running Privoxy on a machine which has the
    #      address 192.168.0.1 on your local private network (192.168.0.0)
    #      and has another outside connection with a different address. You
    #      want it to serve requests from inside only:
    #
    #        listen-address  192.168.0.1:8118
    #
    #
    listen-address  127.0.0.1:8118
    #
    #
    #  4.2. toggle
    #  ============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Initial state of "toggle" status
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      1 or 0
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      1
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Act as if toggled on
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      If set to 0, Privoxy will start in "toggled off" mode,
    #      i.e. mostly behave like a normal, content-neutral proxy
    #      with both ad blocking and content filtering disabled. See
    #      enable-remote-toggle below.
    #
    #      The windows version will only display the toggle icon in the
    #      system tray if this option is present.
    #
    toggle  1
    #
    #
    #  4.3. enable-remote-toggle
    #  ==========================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether or not the web-based toggle feature may be used
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The web-based toggle feature is disabled.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      When toggled off, Privoxy mostly acts like a normal,
    #      content-neutral proxy, i.e. doesn't block ads or filter content.
    #
    #      Access to the toggle feature can not be controlled separately by
    #      "ACLs" or HTTP authentication, so that everybody who can access
    #      Privoxy (see "ACLs" and listen-address above) can toggle it
    #      for all users. So this option is not recommended for multi-user
    #      environments with untrusted users.
    #
    #      Note that malicious client side code (e.g Java) is also capable
    #      of using this option.
    #
    #      As a lot of Privoxy users don't read documentation, this feature
    #      is disabled by default.
    #
    #      Note that you must have compiled Privoxy with support for this
    #      feature, otherwise this option has no effect.
    #
    enable-remote-toggle  0
    #
    #
    #  4.4. enable-remote-http-toggle
    #  ===============================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether or not Privoxy recognizes special HTTP headers to change
    #      its behaviour.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Privoxy ignores special HTTP headers.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      When toggled on, the client can change Privoxy's behaviour by
    #      setting special HTTP headers. Currently the only supported
    #      special header is "X-Filter: No", to disable filtering for
    #      the ongoing request, even if it is enabled in one of the
    #      action files.
    #
    #      This feature is disabled by default. If you are using Privoxy in
    #      a environment with trusted clients, you may enable this feature
    #      at your discretion. Note that malicious client side code (e.g
    #      Java) is also capable of using this feature.
    #
    #      This option will be removed in future releases as it has been
    #      obsoleted by the more general header taggers.
    #
    enable-remote-http-toggle  0
    #
    #
    #  4.5. enable-edit-actions
    #  =========================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether or not the web-based actions file editor may be used
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The web-based actions file editor is disabled.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Access to the editor can not be controlled separately by
    #      "ACLs" or HTTP authentication, so that everybody who can access
    #      Privoxy (see "ACLs" and listen-address above) can modify its
    #      configuration for all users.
    #
    #      This option is not recommended for environments with untrusted
    #      users and as a lot of Privoxy users don't read documentation,
    #      this feature is disabled by default.
    #
    #      Note that malicious client side code (e.g Java) is also capable
    #      of using the actions editor and you shouldn't enable this
    #      options unless you understand the consequences and are sure
    #      your browser is configured correctly.
    #
    #      Note that you must have compiled Privoxy with support for this
    #      feature, otherwise this option has no effect.
    #
    enable-edit-actions 0
    #
    #
    #  4.6. enforce-blocks
    #  ====================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether the user is allowed to ignore blocks and can "go there
    #      anyway".
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Blocks are not enforced.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Privoxy is mainly used to block and filter requests as a service
    #      to the user, for example to block ads and other junk that clogs
    #      the pipes.  Privoxy's configuration isn't perfect and sometimes
    #      innocent pages are blocked. In this situation it makes sense to
    #      allow the user to enforce the request and have Privoxy ignore
    #      the block.
    #
    #      In the default configuration Privoxy's "Blocked" page contains
    #      a "go there anyway" link to adds a special string (the force
    #      prefix) to the request URL. If that link is used, Privoxy
    #      will detect the force prefix, remove it again and let the
    #      request pass.
    #
    #      Of course Privoxy can also be used to enforce a network
    #      policy. In that case the user obviously should not be able to
    #      bypass any blocks, and that's what the "enforce-blocks" option
    #      is for. If it's enabled, Privoxy hides the "go there anyway"
    #      link. If the user adds the force prefix by hand, it will not
    #      be accepted and the circumvention attempt is logged.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      enforce-blocks 1
    #
    enforce-blocks 0
    #
    #
    #  4.7. ACLs: permit-access and deny-access
    #  =========================================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Who can access what.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      src_addr[/src_masklen] [dst_addr[/dst_masklen]]
    #
    #      Where src_addr and dst_addr are IP addresses in dotted decimal
    #      notation or valid DNS names, and src_masklen and dst_masklen are
    #      subnet masks in CIDR notation, i.e. integer values from 2 to 30
    #      representing the length (in bits) of the network address. The
    #      masks and the whole destination part are optional.
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Don't restrict access further than implied by listen-address
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Access controls are included at the request of ISPs and systems
    #      administrators, and are not usually needed by individual
    #      users. For a typical home user, it will normally suffice to
    #      ensure that Privoxy only listens on the localhost (127.0.0.1)
    #      or internal (home) network address by means of the listen-address
    #      option.
    #
    #      Please see the warnings in the FAQ that Privoxy is not intended
    #      to be a substitute for a firewall or to encourage anyone to
    #      defer addressing basic security weaknesses.
    #
    #      Multiple ACL lines are OK. If any ACLs are specified, Privoxy
    #      only talks to IP addresses that match at least one permit-access
    #      line and don't match any subsequent deny-access line. In other
    #      words, the last match wins, with the default being deny-access.
    #
    #      If Privoxy is using a forwarder (see forward below) for a
    #      particular destination URL, the dst_addr that is examined is
    #      the address of the forwarder and NOT the address of the ultimate
    #      target. This is necessary because it may be impossible for the
    #      local Privoxy to determine the IP address of the ultimate target
    #      (that's often what gateways are used for).
    #
    #      You should prefer using IP addresses over DNS names, because
    #      the address lookups take time. All DNS names must resolve! You
    #      can not use domain patterns like "*.org" or partial domain
    #      names. If a DNS name resolves to multiple IP addresses, only
    #      the first one is used.
    #
    #      Denying access to particular sites by ACL may have undesired
    #      side effects if the site in question is hosted on a machine
    #      which also hosts other sites (most sites are).
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      Explicitly define the default behavior if no ACL and
    #      listen-address are set: "localhost" is OK. The absence of a
    #      dst_addr implies that all destination addresses are OK:
    #
    #        permit-access  localhost
    #
    #
    #      Allow any host on the same class C subnet as www.privoxy.org
    #      access to nothing but www.example.com (or other domains hosted
    #      on the same system):
    #
    #        permit-access  www.privoxy.org/24 www.example.com/32
    #
    #
    #      Allow access from any host on the 26-bit subnet 192.168.45.64 to
    #      anywhere, with the exception that 192.168.45.73 may not access
    #      the IP address behind www.dirty-stuff.example.com:
    #
    #        permit-access  192.168.45.64/26 
    #        deny-access   192.168.45.73  www.dirty-stuff.example.com
    #
    #
    #
    #  4.8. buffer-limit
    #  ==================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Maximum size of the buffer for content filtering.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Size in Kbytes
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      4096
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Use a 4MB (4096 KB) limit.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      For content filtering, i.e. the +filter and +deanimate-gif
    #      actions, it is necessary that Privoxy buffers the entire document
    #      body. This can be potentially dangerous, since a server could
    #      just keep sending data indefinitely and wait for your RAM to
    #      exhaust -- with nasty consequences.  Hence this option.
    #
    #      When a document buffer size reaches the buffer-limit, it is
    #      flushed to the client unfiltered and no further attempt to filter
    #      the rest of the document is made. Remember that there may be
    #      multiple threads running, which might require up to buffer-limit
    #      Kbytes each, unless you have enabled "single-threaded" above.
    #
    buffer-limit 4096
    #
    #
    #  5. FORWARDING
    #  ==============
    #
    #  This feature allows routing of HTTP requests through a chain of
    #  multiple proxies.
    #
    #  Forwarding can be used to chain Privoxy with a caching proxy to
    #  speed up browsing. Using a parent proxy may also be necessary if
    #  the machine that Privoxy runs on has no direct Internet access.
    #
    #  Note that parent proxies can severely decrease your privacy
    #  level. For example a parent proxy could add your IP address to the
    #  request headers and if it's a caching proxy it may add the "Etag"
    #  header to revalidation requests again, even though you configured
    #  Privoxy to remove it. It may also ignore Privoxy's header time
    #  randomization and use the original values which could be used by
    #  the server as cookie replacement to track your steps between visits.
    #
    #  Also specified here are SOCKS proxies. Privoxy supports the SOCKS
    #  4 and SOCKS 4A protocols.
    #
    #
    #
    #  5.1. forward
    #  =============
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      To which parent HTTP proxy specific requests should be routed.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      target_pattern http_parent[:port]
    #
    #      where target_pattern is a URL pattern that specifies to which
    #      requests (i.e. URLs) this forward rule shall apply. Use /
    #      to denote "all URLs".  http_parent[:port] is the DNS name or
    #      IP address of the parent HTTP proxy through which the requests
    #      should be forwarded, optionally followed by its listening port
    #      (default: 8080). Use a single dot (.) to denote "no forwarding".
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Don't use parent HTTP proxies.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      If http_parent is ".", then requests are not forwarded to
    #      another HTTP proxy but are made directly to the web servers.
    #
    #      Multiple lines are OK, they are checked in sequence, and the
    #      last match wins.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      Everything goes to an example parent proxy, except SSL on port
    #      443 (which it doesn't handle):
    #
    #        forward   /      parent-proxy.example.org:8080 
    #        forward   :443   .
    #
    #
    #      Everything goes to our example ISP's caching proxy, except for
    #      requests to that ISP's sites:
    #
    #        forward   /                  caching-proxy.isp.example.net:8000
    #        forward   .isp.example.net   .
    #
    #
    #
    #
    #  5.2. forward-socks4, forward-socks4a and forward-socks5
    #  ========================================================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Through which SOCKS proxy (and optionally to which parent HTTP
    #      proxy) specific requests should be routed.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      target_pattern socks_proxy[:port] http_parent[:port]
    #
    #      where target_pattern is a URL pattern that specifies to which
    #      requests (i.e. URLs) this forward rule shall apply. Use / to
    #      denote "all URLs".  http_parent and socks_proxy are IP addresses
    #      in dotted decimal notation or valid DNS names (http_parent may
    #      be "." to denote "no HTTP forwarding"), and the optional port
    #      parameters are TCP ports, i.e. integer values from 1 to 65535
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      Unset
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Don't use SOCKS proxies.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Multiple lines are OK, they are checked in sequence, and the
    #      last match wins.
    #
    #      The difference between forward-socks4 and forward-socks4a
    #      is that in the SOCKS 4A protocol, the DNS resolution of the
    #      target hostname happens on the SOCKS server, while in SOCKS 4
    #      it happens locally.
    #
    #      With forward-socks5 the DNS resolution will happen on the remote
    #      server as well.
    #
    #      If http_parent is ".", then requests are not forwarded to another
    #      HTTP proxy but are made (HTTP-wise) directly to the web servers,
    #      albeit through a SOCKS proxy.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      From the company example.com, direct connections are made to all
    #      "internal" domains, but everything outbound goes through their
    #      ISP's proxy by way of example.com's corporate SOCKS 4A gateway
    #      to the Internet.
    #
    #        forward-socks4a   /       socks-gw.example.com:1080    www-cache.isp.example.net:8080 
    #        forward           .example.com        .
    #
    #
    #      A rule that uses a SOCKS 4 gateway for all destinations but no
    #      HTTP parent looks like this:
    #
    #        forward-socks4   /               socks-gw.example.com:1080  .
    #
    #
    #      To chain Privoxy and Tor, both running on the same system,
    #      you would use something like:
    #
    #        forward-socks4a   /               127.0.0.1:9050 .
    #
    #
    #      The public Tor network can't be used to reach your local network,
    #      if you need to access local servers you therefore might want
    #      to make some exceptions:
    #
    #        forward         192.168.*.*/     .  
    #        forward         10.*.*.*/        .  
    #        forward         127.*.*.*/       .
    #
    #
    #      Unencrypted connections to systems in these address ranges will
    #      be as (un) secure as the local network is, but the alternative
    #      is that you can't reach the local network through Privoxy at
    #      all. Of course this may actually be desired and there is no
    #      reason to make these exceptions if you aren't sure you need them.
    #
    #      If you also want to be able to reach servers in your local
    #      network by using their names, you will need additional exceptions
    #      that look like this:
    #
    #       forward           localhost/     .
    #
    #
    #
    #
    #  5.3. forwarded-connect-retries
    #  ===============================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      How often Privoxy retries if a forwarded connection request
    #      fails.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      Number of retries.
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Connections forwarded through other proxies are treated like
    #      direct connections and no retry attempts are made.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      forwarded-connect-retries is mainly interesting for socks4a
    #      connections, where Privoxy can't detect why the connections
    #      failed. The connection might have failed because of a DNS timeout
    #      in which case a retry makes sense, but it might also have failed
    #      because the server doesn't exist or isn't reachable. In this
    #      case the retry will just delay the appearance of Privoxy's
    #      error message.
    #
    #      Note that in the context of this option, "forwarded connections"
    #      includes all connections that Privoxy forwards through other
    #      proxies. This option is not limited to the HTTP CONNECT method.
    #
    #      Only use this option, if you are getting lots of
    #      forwarding-related error messages that go away when you try again
    #      manually. Start with a small value and check Privoxy's logfile
    #      from time to time, to see how many retries are usually needed.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      forwarded-connect-retries 1
    #
    forwarded-connect-retries  0
    #
    #
    #  5.4. accept-intercepted-requests
    #  =================================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether intercepted requests should be treated as valid.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Only proxy requests are accepted, intercepted requests are
    #      treated as invalid.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      If you don't trust your clients and want to force them to use
    #      Privoxy, enable this option and configure your packet filter
    #      to redirect outgoing HTTP connections into Privoxy.
    #
    #      Make sure that Privoxy's own requests aren't redirected as well.
    #      Additionally take care that Privoxy can't intentionally connect
    #      to itself, otherwise you could run into redirection loops if
    #      Privoxy's listening port is reachable by the outside or an
    #      attacker has access to the pages you visit.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      accept-intercepted-requests 1
    #
    accept-intercepted-requests 0
    #
    #
    #  5.5. allow-cgi-request-crunching
    #  =================================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether requests to Privoxy's CGI pages can be blocked or
    #      redirected.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      Privoxy ignores block and redirect actions for its CGI pages.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      By default Privoxy ignores block or redirect actions for
    #      its CGI pages.  Intercepting these requests can be useful in
    #      multi-user setups to implement fine-grained access control,
    #      but it can also render the complete web interface useless and
    #      make debugging problems painful if done without care.
    #
    #      Don't enable this option unless you're sure that you really
    #      need it.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      allow-cgi-request-crunching 1
    #
    allow-cgi-request-crunching 0
    #
    #
    #  5.6. split-large-forms
    #  =======================
    #
    #  Specifies:
    #
    #      Whether the CGI interface should stay compatible with broken
    #      HTTP clients.
    #
    #  Type of value:
    #
    #      0 or 1
    #
    #  Default value:
    #
    #      0
    #
    #  Effect if unset:
    #
    #      The CGI form generate long GET URLs.
    #
    #  Notes:
    #
    #      Privoxy's CGI forms can lead to rather long URLs. This isn't
    #      a problem as far as the HTTP standard is concerned, but it can
    #      confuse clients with arbitrary URL length limitations.
    #
    #      Enabling split-large-forms causes Privoxy to divide big forms
    #      into smaller ones to keep the URL length down. It makes editing
    #      a lot less convenient and you can no longer submit all changes
    #      at once, but at least it works around this browser bug.
    #
    #      If you don't notice any editing problems, there is no reason
    #      to enable this option, but if one of the submit buttons appears
    #      to be broken, you should give it a try.
    #
    #  Examples:
    #
    #      split-large-forms 1
    #
    split-large-forms 0
    #
    #
    #  6. WINDOWS GUI OPTIONS
    #  =======================
    #
    #  Privoxy has a number of options specific to the Windows GUI
    #  interface:
    #
    #
    #  If "activity-animation" is set to 1, the Privoxy icon will animate
    #  when "Privoxy" is active. To turn off, set to 0.
    #
    #activity-animation   1
    #
    #  If "log-messages" is set to 1, Privoxy will log messages to the
    #  console window:
    #
    #log-messages   1
    #
    #  If "log-buffer-size" is set to 1, the size of the log buffer,
    #  i.e. the amount of memory used for the log messages displayed in
    #  the console window, will be limited to "log-max-lines" (see below).
    #
    #  Warning: Setting this to 0 will result in the buffer to grow
    #  infinitely and eat up all your memory!
    #
    #log-buffer-size 1
    #
    #  log-max-lines is the maximum number of lines held in the log
    #  buffer. See above.
    #
    #log-max-lines 200
    #
    #  If "log-highlight-messages" is set to 1, Privoxy will highlight
    #  portions of the log messages with a bold-faced font:
    #
    #log-highlight-messages 1
    #
    #  The font used in the console window:
    #
    #log-font-name Comic Sans MS
    #
    #  Font size used in the console window:
    #
    #log-font-size 8
    #
    #  "show-on-task-bar" controls whether or not Privoxy will appear as
    #  a button on the Task bar when minimized:
    #
    #show-on-task-bar 0
    #
    #  If "close-button-minimizes" is set to 1, the Windows close button
    #  will minimize Privoxy instead of closing the program (close with
    #  the exit option on the File menu).
    #
    #close-button-minimizes 1
    #
    #  The "hide-console" option is specific to the MS-Win console version
    #  of Privoxy.  If this option is used, Privoxy will disconnect from
    #  and hide the command console.
    #
    #hide-console
    #
    #
    ###################################################################33
    # Generally, this file goes in /etc/privoxy/config
    #
    # Tor listens as a SOCKS4a proxy here:
    forward-socks4a / localhost:9050 .
    confdir /etc/privoxy
    logdir /var/log/privoxy
    actionsfile standard  # Internal purpose, recommended
    actionsfile default   # Main actions file
    actionsfile user      # User customizations
    filterfile default.filter
    
    # Don't log interesting things, only startup messages, warnings and errors
    #logfile logfile
    #jarfile jarfile
    #debug   0    # show each GET/POST/CONNECT request
    debug   4096 # Startup banner and warnings
    debug   8192 # Errors - *we highly recommended enabling this*
    
    user-manual /usr/share/doc/privoxy/user-manual
    listen-address  localhost:8118
    toggle  1
    enable-remote-toggle 0
    enable-edit-actions 0
    enable-remote-http-toggle 0
    buffer-limit 4096

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Beans
    258

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Hello...?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Beans
    466
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Bump
    ~

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Beans
    Hidden!

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Using n.n.n.n octet notation instead of "localhost" saves the application from having to do lookups (even though in the case of "localhost" it is inexpensive due to /etc/hosts mapping and nscd caching). Still, if for instance your /etc/hosts doesn't contain a "localhost" entry then all sorts of interesting problems may occur.

    - Make certain TOR is configured OK (SafeSocks 0, TestSocks 1, SocksPort 9050), has debug logging enabled and is running ('lsof -P -n -i:9050' should show) and tail its logfile at service startup/restart to see system messages and requests.

    - Make certain Privoxy is configured OK, has logging enabled (logfile logfile, debug 8192) and is running ('lsof -P -n -i:8118' should show). Here too: tail its logfile to see messages and requests.

    - Make sure Forefox is configured to use a SOCKS4a host for proxying and uses the 8118 port.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Beans
    258

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Thanks! TOR is now up and running perfectly.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Hidden!

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shampyon View Post
    Thanks! TOR is now up and running perfectly.
    Cool. So what did you do to fix things?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Beans
    36

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Yeah common let's hear your magic.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Hidden!

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    Yes, please tel us what you did because some of us are having the same issue...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Beans
    12

    Re: Tor/Privoxy newbie - Proxy refusing connections?

    I found this site and it didn't fix the problem, but it helped me discover the problem and hence the solution:

    http://nickhumphrey.net/showthread.php?p=3376

    I followed those instructions, I'm using polipo and I copied the config file to /etc/polipo and I replaced the "config" file there (after backing up the original of course).

    Here's what I got when I tried to restart tor in terminal:

    Code:
    $ sudo service tor restart
    Stopping tor daemon: not running (there is no /var/run/tor/tor.pid).
    Raising maximum number of filedescriptors (ulimit -n) to 32768.
    Starting tor daemon: tor...
    May 10 09:56:03.839 [notice] Tor v0.2.1.30. This is experimental software. Do not rely on it for strong anonymity. (Running on Linux i686)
    May 10 09:56:03.841 [notice] Initialized libevent version 1.4.13-stable using method epoll. Good.
    May 10 09:56:03.841 [notice] Opening Socks listener on 127.0.0.1:9050
    May 10 09:56:03.841 [warn] Could not bind to 127.0.0.1:9050: Address already in use. Is Tor already running?
    May 10 09:56:03.841 [warn] Failed to parse/validate config: Failed to bind one of the listener ports.
    May 10 09:56:03.841 [err] Reading config failed--see warnings above.
    Based on the underlined warning above and this link:
    https://trac-vidalia.torproject.org/...lia/ticket/110

    I killed the existing Tor process:

    With Vidalia running (icon visible in task-bar),
    First, I Disabled Tor in the Firefox button.

    Then, I went to:
    System->Administration->System Monitor
    End process: Tor


    At that time, I had the Vidalia onion icon visible in the task bar, which displayed a red X.

    I right-clicked on the Vidalia task-bar icon and clicked Start Tor.

    The icon turned to a yellow onion, then green.

    Back in Firefox, set Tor Enabled.

    Try website of choice.

    You should be rocking.

    Last edited by uBuddhu; May 10th, 2011 at 09:46 PM.

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