Greetings all,

A long-standing wish of mine has been to record the variety of electric string instruments I play (bass, guitar, banjo and ukulele) - so as to create a virtual ensemble. For your information: I'm running Ubuntu Dream Studio 12.04 - and the console in use is a 2Gb RAM Dell Optiplex desktop.

So far, I have been staring myself blind on what Ardour has on offer- but I find its multi-faceted splendor rather daunting, to be honest. And not exactly user-friendly, too, at first sight. Besides, Ardour has yet to produce some sound from my headset, but to this day I still don't get any - in spite of some excellent external help acquired, over the years. I also heard a whisper that UNIX has indeed some drawbacks, with respect to audio.

Trying for other options for multitracking, I studied various aspects of Audacity - over one weekend - through tutorials on YouTube. Pleased with what I saw, I now believe that Audacity may be very much more suited to my needs: it seems really versatile and rather more straightforward than Ardour.

My idea now is to link up Rakarrack with Audacity - the former for multi-effects in general (and the added bonus of turning the sound of the lower strings of an electric guitar into an electric bass's). On how best to go about here YouTube Google and all the rest, however,let me down. And so I'm hoping, of course, for some helpful suggestions from you lot out there.

My issues recapped:

- Ardour: no sound from headphones, at attempting to insert string instrument wave; no playback either.
- The source of this problem must be somewhere in Jackctl, surely. Several people with excellent Ubuntu expertise have tinkered with it, over the years - but to no avail, so far. The fault has been declared fixed several times over now, yet it seems to me that the system consistently "snaps back" to default settings. Can that be?
- Audacity & Rakarrack: how best to set-up those two in order to use them simultaneously? In other words: I'd need those Rakarrack effects in Audacity.

Thank you very much.

tnob