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mitchroberts
November 23rd, 2008, 06:55 AM
i do not have all the info on this but the people i am doing this for would like a server with very high security they said something about ubuntu and fedora i myself use ubuntu and have only played with fedora what i was needing to know is the one that has the most security.

thanks:guitar:

ITAndrew
November 23rd, 2008, 07:03 AM
I would say both are equally as secure. They (Fedora and Ubuntu) are only able to release updated packages when the (Open source or Proprietary) developers release them, and there packagers approve and bundle into updates.

If you want a system that was designed for security from the ground up I would recommend FreeBSD due to their port and core security auditing process.

mitchroberts
November 23rd, 2008, 07:21 AM
I would say both are equally as secure. They (Fedora and Ubuntu) are only able to release updated packages when the (Open source or Proprietary) developers release them, and there packagers approve and bundle into updates.

If you want a system that was designed for security from the ground up I would recommend FreeBSD due to their port and core security auditing process.

freebsd i do not know that os very well what are the advantage of it?

ITAndrew
November 23rd, 2008, 07:34 AM
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-freebsd/

A good read, also wiki is a good spot to find some information.

Also, something I dont think is covered by the link is its RAM usage. I currently run FreeBSD at home as a FAMP (FreeBSD, Apache, Mysql, PHP) E-mail, NFS, Samba server as well as my desktop OS. At full boot the system uses a bit over 130 MB of active RAM, before load. Which I think is quite impressive.

Also it give you a good grasp of most Unix systems (although it is only Unix Like).

Granted this is one mans opinion, but an honest one ;-)

mitchroberts
November 23rd, 2008, 07:53 AM
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-freebsd/

A good read, also wiki is a good spot to find some information.

Also, something I dont think is covered by the link is its RAM usage. I currently run FreeBSD at home as a FAMP (FreeBSD, Apache, Mysql, PHP) E-mail, NFS, Samba server as well as my desktop OS. At full boot the system uses a bit over 130 MB of active RAM, before load. Which I think is quite impressive.

Also it give you a good grasp of most Unix systems (although it is only Unix Like).

Granted this is one mans opinion, but an honest one ;-)



a honest opinion is what i am looking for i have used unix before it has
been a few years and i am sure it changed some but i wouldn't be starting
off not knowing anything about. thank you