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BackwardsDown
November 12th, 2008, 03:46 PM
Hi,

I want to learn C++ (again). About 2/3 years ago I tried to learn this langauge as my first language. I found it horribly difficult to learn all its grills, I bet it had also something to do with the horrible outdated book I was using.

Now I want to try it again, and I got hold of a printed copy of this book: http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkcpp/ . Can anyone tell me if its any good?

Thanks.

samjh
November 13th, 2008, 06:06 AM
It's OK. Not great, but not too bad.

Ignore the section about strings. The author uses apstrings, which was developed for the US AP exams, and is not a part of standard C++.

These books are much better:
Accelerated C++ (http://www.amazon.com/Accelerated-Practical-Programming-Example-Depth/dp/020170353X)
C++ Primer Plus (5th ed.) (http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Plus-5th-Stephen-Prata/dp/0672326973)

I presume you've learned at least a little bit about programming between 2/3 years ago and now. Otherwise you may still find it very hard to learn C++. Not meaning to discourage you, but C++ is not friendly to novices, although it is certainly learn-able.

BackwardsDown
November 13th, 2008, 08:41 AM
Yeah, in time I learned myself php (working as a php-programmer for ~8 hours a week), at school we have had a bit of Java and recently I've read a book about python.

The green tee press book is really nice, only I've almost finished it, a lot I remembered and many things are the same for java/python. Also the apstring and apvector examples could be easily converted to the official string and vector libraries.

But there is not much/nothing about interherance and the more advanced OO-programming. Thanks for the 2 book tips, I will look into it:)

I have also read something about C++0x, is this a new standard coming up? Should I be paying attention to this, or is it not that different?

samjh
November 13th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Yeah, in time I learned myself php (working as a php-programmer for ~8 hours a week), at school we have had a bit of Java and recently I've read a book about python.

The green tee press book is really nice, only I've almost finished it, a lot I remembered and many things are the same for java/python. Also the apstring and apvector examples could be easily converted to the official string and vector libraries.

But there is not much/nothing about interherance and the more advanced OO-programming. Thanks for the 2 book tips, I will look into it:)

I have also read something about C++0x, is this a new standard coming up? Should I be paying attention to this, or is it not that different?

Green Tea Press' best books are the Python ones. The best Python books around, I think. :)

Before getting too hungry about more advanced aspects of C++, I suggest you try to consolidate your understanding of the basics by doing a fairly simple project. You may be surprised at how shallow your understanding of the basics are. C++ has lots of little knots for novices to trip over (most languages have them, but C++ is quite notorious).

C++0x is the new standard currently in development. Don't worry about it. Even when it does come out eventually, the 1998 C++ standard will continue to be in use for many years, so you'll have plenty of time to learn about C++0x later. It's no use trying to learn it now, because it's still a moving target.

Good luck with C++. I myself am trying to learn more advanced C++ programming, after 6 years of using it as just a "better C". ;)