PDA

View Full Version : [ubuntu] Should I upgrade on an old system?



MikeND05
November 12th, 2008, 02:31 AM
While waiting to buy a new graphics card for my desktop, I'm using my old laptop that chugs along at a not-terrible rate on Gutsy. It's Pentium III, 256 mb. Would upgrading the distro be wise on such a slow system, or is Hardy (or 8.10) actually faster?

Thanks.

T2manner
November 12th, 2008, 02:33 AM
Well..
Intrepid Ibex is the newest version.
I would upgrade to that and if it's to slow then try out Xubuntu which works great on slow computers :]

redseventyseven
November 12th, 2008, 02:34 AM
What are the specs of your machine?

If you can bear to live without Gnome or KDE you could always try Xubuntu.

redseventyseven
November 12th, 2008, 02:46 AM
Well..
Intrepid Ibex is the newest version.
I would upgrade to that and if it's to slow then try out Xubuntu which works great on slow computers :]

I'm not sure I would agree with the first part of this - Intrepid Ibex may well be the newer version but Hardy is the current version with long-term support. That may be more valuable than having the absolute latest gizmos on an old machine IMO.

oilchangeguy
November 12th, 2008, 02:55 AM
While waiting to buy a new graphics card for my desktop, I'm using my old laptop that chugs along at a not-terrible rate on Gutsy. It's Pentium III, 256 mb. Would upgrading the distro be wise on such a slow system, or is Hardy (or 8.10) actually faster?

Thanks.

if it ain't broke, don't fix it. newer operating system = needs more powerful computer (ubuntu).

ichi@YUKI
November 12th, 2008, 03:02 AM
What are the minimum specs recommended for running the latest releases?.. i'm still on Gutsy as of the moment.

Miljet
November 12th, 2008, 03:02 AM
I have to agree with RedSeventySeven on this. You will have about 5 more months support for Gutsy. If yo plan to replace or upgrade within that time frame, I would just stick with Gutsy. I would suspect that on that old a machine, you don't have a very large hard disk. But if you do have enough space, it would be worth installing 8.04 in a separate partition to see if it will work. That would give you a longer support time frame.

oilchangeguy
November 12th, 2008, 03:03 AM
What are the minimum specs recommended for running the latest releases?.. i'm still on Gutsy as of the moment.

see www.ubuntu.com

MikeND05
November 12th, 2008, 03:20 AM
If you can bear to live without Gnome or KDE you could always try Xubuntu.

What would the primary differences be? I'm still fairly new at this...

Living2007
November 12th, 2008, 03:25 AM
While waiting to buy a new graphics card for my desktop, I'm using my old laptop that chugs along at a not-terrible rate on Gutsy. It's Pentium III, 256 mb. Would upgrading the distro be wise on such a slow system, or is Hardy (or 8.10) actually faster?

Thanks.
Because newer OS require more memory and CPU, i would say no.
but go for Xubuntu 8.10.

Xubuntu uses at least 192 MB

zvacet
November 12th, 2008, 03:58 AM
What would the primary differences be?

Xubuntu needs less ram and that is most important for you right now if you want to run Hardy ( in my opinion that is best choice for you,because it is LTS).You will probably need some time (few days,week...) to get used to new desktop,but that is not real problem.So,take Xubuntu hardy and enjoy.

Bartender
November 12th, 2008, 04:04 AM
I'd scrounge up some more RAM. You'll see a huge improvement if you can get to 512 or better.

LowSky
November 12th, 2008, 04:29 AM
I just upgraded from a AMD Athlon64 3700+ to a AMD Phenom 9950,the difference is night and day! So for you it will be like going from a typewriter to a supercomputer....lol

handydan918
November 12th, 2008, 04:45 AM
Because newer OS require more memory and CPU, i would say no.
but go for Xubuntu 8.10.

Xubuntu uses at least 192 MB

Ya know, this just isn't necessarily the gospel. I play with Debian enough to tell you that Lenny is a lot faster on the same hardware than any of the last several iterations of Ubu....

redseventyseven
November 12th, 2008, 10:52 AM
Because newer OS require more memory and CPU, i would say no.
but go for Xubuntu 8.10.

Xubuntu uses at least 192 MB

Or, if you want long-term support, Xubuntu 8.04.
Or Linux Mint 5.0 XFCE edition. It essentially uses Xubuntu 8.04 as its backbone but has a few slight differences. It too has long-term support.