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mendozaro
October 30th, 2008, 04:45 PM
I own a company that could develop some games that could run natively on Ubuntu (or any Linux).

Would you, spend money on my games?


EDIT 21 OCT 2009: It has been one year since this post started. Due to problems that affected mostly the entire world (financial crisis) we kind off changed the plans and didn't developed / released nothing until now.

Now, the order is changed and we really need to do something :)

The original post:

Lets just pretend that i own a company that can develop some games / applications that could run natively on Ubuntu (or any Linux).
Lets also just pretend, that you, dear reader need the software i am making... Would you, in this case, spend the money on my software or wait / search for some free alternative?
For the matter to be more clear, lets also pretend that the alternative free software is almost, but not as good as the payed solution offered by me. And we also have to pretend that the price i'm asking for my software would be more than fair (low cost).

gn2
October 30th, 2008, 04:53 PM
If it ws something I really wanted and it worked properly, I would be happy to pay.

Eisenwinter
October 30th, 2008, 04:55 PM
I think all software should be free as in freedom, and free as in free beer.
I believe that by making software more easily accessible, people can really learn more, grow, and evolve.

artir
October 30th, 2008, 04:59 PM
You should put ads on your games :) and make them free then

pp.
October 30th, 2008, 05:00 PM
If it ws something I really wanted and it worked properly, I would be happy to pay.

Same here. I am still using software I have paid money for. I even use a product sold by Microsoft.

Ub1476
October 30th, 2008, 05:01 PM
Only if it was for my proffesion. However, there are a lot of nuts around who buys Microsoft Office 2007 when they don't really need it.

Maybe not *all* the people around in the community cafe would buy software just because it's *better*, but not for their needs, but heeps of other people using Ubuntu surely would.

semitone36
October 30th, 2008, 05:02 PM
Unfortunately I would go for the free software. I understand how this is affecting the small businesses of the programming world but the philosophy behind open source is just too promising for me not to support it.

However if you were programming a GAME I would gladly pay your price. In my eye games are different then just software, try as hard as you want you cant make an exact copy of an artists work (aside from pirating).

mendozaro
October 30th, 2008, 05:16 PM
Yeah, the problem with free...

I agree with low prices, i also agree with making the software free after lets say 2-3 years of selling it. BUT i cant agree with free software.

Someone did pay for each FREE software out there! Ubuntu is payed by Canonical, other pieces are payed by other companies... but most are payed by simple developers - i am talking here about the MANY hours spent by a programmer to make any piece of software.

Now in my case, EVEN if i could pay myself for the programming and release the software free, it would be a one time thing that would surely get me broke.

So isn't it better to just sell the software for a low price and be able to go on with the production of other software?

Northsider
October 30th, 2008, 05:33 PM
Or option 3, which is... ...well, let's just say I'd go with option 2 or 3.

blakjesus
October 30th, 2008, 05:34 PM
I love free software (freedom and beer) but if you could prove that the software you offer is truly superior to the free version, i would probably buy it if if was a fair price.

vikramaditya
October 30th, 2008, 05:41 PM
I agree with low prices, i also agree with making the software free after lets say 2-3 years of selling it.
I think all "intellectual property" should be non-transferable and retired to the public domain after a period not to exceed 20 years. That said, I don't and won't purchase ones and zeros.

/ducks into foxhole, prepares for lucid rebuttals.

solitaire
October 30th, 2008, 05:47 PM
I'd be willing to pay a low cost fee for software.

I use both free and paid software (closed and open source). If the money goes into keeping the developer working on the project and improving it (or in the case of open source, Helping others improve it) then that's for the better.

NewJack
October 30th, 2008, 05:53 PM
I would not pay for programs I use on a day to day basis like word processor, cd/dvd burner, etc.. But I would pay for a good game. For instance, my buddy picked up Dead Space (EA) and it is a great game (No matter how you feel about EA). Call of Duty 5 looks pretty good too. I would pay for them, no problem.

Spark*
October 30th, 2008, 06:21 PM
I would not if it's only slightly better, because proprietary licenses make the software itself less usable to me (mostly lack of integration and lack of a guarantee that the software will still be developed next month... or that the bugs that make it unusable for me will ever be fixed).

If the software is dramatically better or allows me to work in a new, interesting way and works extremely well, then I might buy it and would consider it a temporary investment until a comparable free software is available (if ever).

I don't believe in the proprietary software model because of the many ways it negatively affects the user experience (even just the fact that you can't always get the capabilities you need in an urgency) and because selling "license papers" is illogical and awkward in many ways.

I believe that software should primarily be written on request from clients who pay for the development (this of course does not apply to game content and such).

If you aren't already getting payed for writing software, you should also consider that writing that one truly remarkable application and making it available as free software, is probably more likely to generate a steady income for you (by getting hired by a company of your choice), than trying to live from its sales. If you want to be your own boss, then you could either become an independent contractor, or an artist of sorts. Games are an obvious choice for the latter, and you can even create them on top of free software game engines! :)

I would also happily "subscribe" to someone who is working full-time on a free application that is useful for me. There are many ways to give value to a subscription, like basic support, extra content, or related online services. I believe that many such ways will be explored in the future, as the limitations of the proprietary software development model become more and more apparent.

Bölvağur
October 30th, 2008, 06:26 PM
I picked Free. But it is only because I only buy games and perhaps other software that I might desperately need. So if you are making a game that suits my needs, then I'd sign up and pay gladly. But then again, Im a tough customer which has persific needs.

skirkpatrick
October 30th, 2008, 06:40 PM
More than happy to pay a reasonable price with the following caveats: no advertising in my software and don't force me to pay to get new versions.

night_fox
October 30th, 2008, 06:51 PM
Yes I would pay for decent software that didn't exert its will over me.

For the operating system the question seems irrelevant though, because the free software is better in every way. That is the reason I'm not using microsoft any more.

lukjad007
October 30th, 2008, 07:39 PM
Lets just pretend that i own a company that can develop some games / applications that could run natively on Ubuntu (or any Linux).

Lets also just pretend, that you, dear reader need the software i am making... Would you, in this case, spend the money on my software or wait / search for some free alternative?

For the matter to be more clear, lets also pretend that the alternative free software is almost, but not as good as the payed solution offered by me. And we also have to pretend that the price i'm asking for my software would be more than fair (low cost).

Well, if I need something and you are the only one who has it, I would have to buy it, wouldn't I? The problem with the question is that I don't need anything right now. And also, I'm trying to keep on the open source side. If it was open source, I would try to pay as much as I could. If it was closed source, there is a problem. If I choose to pay you over someone who is making an open source alternative, then I would be harming him. Also, When you say need, then if the other one doesn't do what I need to, then using it would be pointless. I really cannot answer your question accurately because of those reasons.

Amazona aestiva
October 30th, 2008, 07:54 PM
If your program served me a service, even if it was a game, that is original and there wasn't alternative to it, I would buy it.

billgoldberg
October 30th, 2008, 07:56 PM
Neither, I use a ps3 for gaming.

Unless you can produce the new counterstrike or red alert games, I'm not buying.

mendozaro
October 30th, 2008, 08:16 PM
In order to make "new counterstrike or red alert games" one needs OBSCENE amounts of money. And obviously that kind of money can't be raised out of the "free based" community.

eentonig
October 30th, 2008, 08:21 PM
Professionally: Buy it, if you could garantuee me support and continued effort to keep it up to date.

Personally:
- For games: Might buy it, if it's decent and not to expensive. I'd have to read some damn good reviews before considering it though.
- Applications: My personal needs are completely covered buy they current free alternatives. Considering they are free, I don't mind the initial tweaking and bug resolving. So I don't think I would buy an application.

MasterNetra
October 30th, 2008, 08:24 PM
As long as it works properly and isn't over priced like CS3/CS4 is. Then yes i would spend the money, assuming I had it to spend.

LaRoza
October 30th, 2008, 08:28 PM
I do not foolishly stick to an ideal for software. I use the best that I can (balanced against price).

I use Opera because it is the best browser. I use Linux because it is the best OS.

mendozaro
October 30th, 2008, 08:45 PM
I just realized i must mention some things!

We also have to pretend i am not that stupid to start with a software project on something that already exists and works just fine! So we are not going to start doing some Brand New Open Office or another Mozilla! Also we are not going to start copying hell knows what game on Linux (see clones)!

mendozaro
October 30th, 2008, 09:53 PM
Its weird for me that such a small part of the people that are reading this post are actually voting...

lukjad007
October 30th, 2008, 10:07 PM
I just realized i must mention some things!

We also have to pretend i am not that stupid to start with a software project on something that already exists and works just fine! So we are not going to start doing some Brand New Open Office or another Mozilla! Also we are not going to start copying hell knows what game on Linux (see clones)!

Well, going with this, then, as I said, I would buy it. If I need it, and you are the only one who makes it, then I would use it. But I must point out that that is a big "if".


Its weird for me that such a small part of the people that are reading this post are actually voting...

Because they are not sure what they would be agreeing to.

mendozaro
October 21st, 2009, 08:56 AM
I have edited the original post. It can be seen as a new thread. I just reactivated this one to keep the original numbers in the pool to.

Bigtime_Scrub
October 21st, 2009, 09:12 AM
I would not buy applications.

I would buy games though. If the games were good and on par with other proprietary games I would certainly buy games for linux.

Paqman
October 21st, 2009, 09:21 AM
Apparently World of Goo's birthday promotion generated 57,000 downloads in a week. Which proves that if the game is good enough, and flogged at a low enough price, even notoriously cheapskate Linux users will cough up.

In general though i'd say that if you want to try and make any real money selling games to Linux users you're probably barking up the wrong tree.

mendozaro
October 21st, 2009, 09:27 AM
Apparently World of Goo's birthday promotion generated 57,000 downloads in a week. Which proves that if the game is good enough, and flogged at a low enough price, even notoriously cheapskate Linux users will cough up.

In general though i'd say that if you want to try and make any real money selling games to Linux users you're probably barking up the wrong tree.

Im one of those 57.000 downloaders / buyers.

I would never do a game JUST for Linux.

t0p
October 21st, 2009, 09:31 AM
Crappy hypothetical question in the poll to which I have no answer. I wouldn't buy a game, I wouldn't wait for a free alternative. I'd drink some vodka and watch a film.

Paqman
October 21st, 2009, 09:34 AM
Im one of those 57.000 downloaders / buyers.

I would never do a game JUST for Linux.

Rock on then :)

Sporkman
October 21st, 2009, 02:14 PM
I think all software should be free as in freedom, and free as in free beer.
I believe that by making software more easily accessible, people can really learn more, grow, and evolve.

You could say that about all goods & services.

JugglinPhil
October 21st, 2009, 03:14 PM
Crappy hypothetical question in the poll to which I have no answer. I wouldn't buy a game, I wouldn't wait for a free alternative. I'd drink some vodka and watch a film.
Haha nice one. :)
I'd probably go for the free one..