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timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 11:50 AM
I have a system with Xbuntu newly installed on one HDD on IDE channel 1, set as the master and a CD Rom as slave. On channel 0, I have another HDD, this one with Win2000 installed. I plan to migrate the files onto the new Xbuntu HDD, and leave the Win 2000 HDD unplugged and inactive, but still there if I ever need to use it for anything. The problem is that I cannot find the HDD in Xbuntu, even in system monitor. It is recognized by BIOS, as it will try to boot off it unless I tell it to boot into Xbuntu from the boot menu.
How con I make it show up in the Xbuntu file system?

Thanks,
Tim

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 12:12 PM
to see if its there try


lshw

see if it shows your unmounted drive.

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 12:29 PM
What am I looking for? The output from that is confusing at best.

prshah
October 23rd, 2008, 12:35 PM
How con I make it show up in the Xbuntu file system?



to see if its there try

lshw


Open a Terminal (Applications-Accessories-Terminal) and post back the output of the command:
sudo fdisk -l

lshw will not list any information about hard disk drives. Correction: lshw _does_ show hard disk drive information, as illustrated below in post #6.

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 12:37 PM
Ok - put this in a terminal and copy the output to the forum so that we can see what is there.


sudo lshw -C disk

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 01:02 PM
sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 41.1 GB, 41110142976 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4998 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0a9c0a9c

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 4997 40138371 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sdb: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3738 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x59607fbd

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 * 1 3579 28748286 83 Linux
/dev/sdb2 3580 3738 1277167+ 5 Extended
/dev/sdb5 3580 3738 1277136 82 Linux swap / Solaris



sudo lshw -C disk
*-disk:0
description: ATA Disk
product: Maxtor 6E040L0
vendor: Maxtor
physical id: 0
bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0
logical name: /dev/sda
version: NAR6
serial: E11GQGXN
size: 38GiB (41GB)
capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
configuration: ansiversion=5 signature=0a9c0a9c
*-cdrom
description: CD-R/CD-RW writer
product: IDE5232
vendor: CDWRITER
physical id: 1
bus info: scsi@1:0.0.0
logical name: /dev/cdrom
logical name: /dev/scd0
logical name: /dev/sr0
version: 000J
capabilities: removable audio cd-r cd-rw
configuration: ansiversion=5 status=open
*-disk:1
description: ATA Disk
product: Maxtor 2F030J0
vendor: Maxtor
physical id: 0.1.0
bus info: scsi@1:0.1.0
logical name: /dev/sdb
version: VAM5
serial: F146KMTE
size: 28GiB (30GB)
capabilities: partitioned partitioned:dos
configuration: ansiversion=5 signature=59607fbd

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 01:45 PM
Hi,
so your second drive is there, /dev/sda1 but is not mounted. You will need to mount it.

does this link help you?

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/mountwindows

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 01:49 PM
Don't think so, I doesn't show up in the places menu!

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 02:19 PM
Here is a link which describes how to use the mount command in a terminal.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount

your device is /dev/sda1 and your filesystem type is ntfs. You need to decide where to mount the device. Have a read of the above and see how you feel about mounting it.

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 02:24 PM
you will need to use a command like


sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

/mnt is the directory upon which the disk is mounted. The normal directory used is /media which should exist. Go in and create an empty directory called ..... something like.... disk1.... and use that as the directory to mount it on.


sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/disk1 -t ntfs

might work.

3rdalbum
October 23rd, 2008, 02:28 PM
If it wasn't automatically mounted, it might have been improperly mounted from within Windows or might be due for a chkdsk. If you can boot up Windows from it just once, try doing that and then shutting down.

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 02:30 PM
Yes, thats a good thought 3rdalbum. Suggest thats the first way to go rather than starting with the mount.

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 02:45 PM
Right, I rebooted into windows, shut down properly, booted back into Xubuntu, but it still isn't showing up. What command do I need to issue to mount it permanently?

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 02:48 PM
firstly can you mount it as suggested?

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 03:01 PM
I tried

sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/disk1 -t ntfs
and got

fuse: failed to access mountpoint /media/disk1: No such file or directory

:confused: Any ideas?

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 03:10 PM
Yes,
you need to create a folder in /media called disk1

In Linux when you mount something it is mounted over an empty folder. When you then go into that folder you see the filesystem that you have mounted. It is complaining because you have tried to mount on a folder that does not exist.

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 03:15 PM
Hi,
the command you want to make the directory is


sudo mkdir /media/disk1

this should make the directory disk1 in the folder /media

Duck2006
October 23rd, 2008, 03:18 PM
Make your mount point.
Edit your fstab.
Then mount the partition.

For windoze

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/mountwindows

For linux

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/mountlinux

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 04:19 PM
So I need to boot up under windows to create the folder?

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 04:21 PM
no, go to Applications->Accessories->terminal

that will open a terminal window.

Type the command in there.

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 04:52 PM
So how which bit of that command identifies which disk that is written to?

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 05:00 PM
You are creating the folder on your Ubuntu disk. This is the one that is mounted already. Having done that we will mount the windows drive onto that folder.

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 05:21 PM
Now it's coming back with device or resource busy.

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 05:35 PM
What command is giving you that error - the mount command?

timbim
October 23rd, 2008, 05:52 PM
Got it now, the contents of the disk shos up in /media/disk1, but it would be preferable to have it listed as a separate volume in places? Is that possible, or will I have to put up with what I already have?

Duck2006
October 23rd, 2008, 06:04 PM
Change your mount point to where you want it to show up, then edit your fstab.

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/mountwindowsfstab

prshah
October 23rd, 2008, 06:22 PM
Got it now, the contents of the disk shos up in /media/disk1, but it would be preferable to have it listed as a separate volume in places? Is that possible, or will I have to put up with what I already have?

If you want it automounted, you have to list it in your /etc/fstab; an entry similar to

/dev/sda1 /media/disk1 ntfs defaults,umask=007,gid=46 0 1
will do the trick.

However, if you want to mount on an as-you-need basis, it's simpler to use pmount (apt://pmount) dynamic mounting; this is similar to what is used when (auto)mounting usb storage devices. Just give the command
pmount /dev/sda1 and it will create the mount point, mount the device, list it in places and adjust the necessary permissions. Similarly use pumount to unmount; note that sudo is neither involved nor required (nor even recommended). Using sudo to mount the device as shown earlier will not allow you to use the ntfs partition as an ordinary user (except to read data), and trying to access it with sudo-ed nautilus (the file manager) will open up a whole new bunch of problems.

Also, for the fstab entry it's better you switch to using UUIDs. To find out the UUID of your ntfs partition, use
sudo blkid /dev/sda1 and then modify the fstab entry as follows
#/dev/sda1
UUID=EC707BBE707B8DD8 /media/disk1 ntfs defaults,umask=007,gid=46 0 1
(Of course, replace the part in RED with the actual UUID of your /dev/sda1)

Also note that both pmount and the above entries require you (your username) to be a member of the group "plugdev" (which is the default behavior in any case).

Peter09
October 23rd, 2008, 09:06 PM
Hi timbim,
hope you finally got things sorted.

timbim
October 24th, 2008, 10:05 AM
I've found the fstab file, but if I try to edit it, it won't let me save. I'm logged in as an administrator, if that helps.

Peter09
October 24th, 2008, 11:03 AM
you are using a command like


sudo gedit /etc/fstab

OK?

timbim
October 24th, 2008, 11:29 AM
Returns
sudo: gedit: command not found

prshah
October 24th, 2008, 03:34 PM
sudo gedit /etc/fstab



Returns
sudo: gedit: command not found

In Xubuntu, use mousepad instead of gedit; but first, make a backup of the original file. From the terminal, give the commands
sudo cp -p /etc/fstab ~
gksu mousepad /etc/fstab

Duck2006
October 24th, 2008, 03:39 PM
[QUOTE]sudo gedit /etc/fstab/[QUOTE]

Should be.

gksudo gedit /etc/fstab[