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View Full Version : [ubuntu] [SOLVED] How to remove a manually compiled kernel



Aramaz
September 23rd, 2008, 11:20 PM
Hi,

I'm pretty new to ubuntu, and especially new to compiling kernels and stuff.

So, I compiled the latest 2.6.27rc7 kernel, but didn't get everything working correctly. Now I want to remove it and keep using the old kernel (2.6.19), how to remove?

thanx for your help.

Titan8990
September 24th, 2008, 12:33 AM
Easiest way is to comment it's line in /boot/grub/menu.lst

nowshining
September 24th, 2008, 12:57 AM
Hi,

I'm pretty new to ubuntu, and especially new to compiling kernels and stuff.

So, I compiled the latest 2.6.27rc7 kernel, but didn't get everything working correctly. Now I want to remove it and keep using the old kernel (2.6.19), how to remove?

thanx for your help.

did u try a more stable kernel - that version as of this posting is in rc stage, also what ver. of ubuntu are u using? If using gutsy the latest u can install is
2.6.24.7 without having any problems..

drs305
September 24th, 2008, 01:05 AM
First reboot into a different kernel (the prior one). If you don't have that option available on your menu.lst on boot, you can either edit your grub menu manually or install and use StartUp-Manager (startupmanager). StartUp-Manager will allow you to set the default kernel or lengthen the menu display time to give you more time to choose. There is a link in my signature line on how to install and use it.

Once you have booted to a different kernel, verify the kernel in use with "uname -r". Depending on how you installed it, you may find it listed in synaptic. If so, rYou can then go into synaptic and remove the unused kernel. Search or otherwise locate the kernel. The package will start with "linux-image" and followed with the kernel number. You can remove it and the associated linux-header file. If you remove it via synaptic your menu.lst will automatically be updated.

nowshining
September 24th, 2008, 01:08 AM
Depending on how you installed it, you may find it listed in synaptic. If so, reboot into a different kernel (the prior one). If you don't have that option available on your menu.lst on boot, you can either edit your grub menu manually or install and use StartUp-Manager (startupmanager). StartUp-Manager will allow you to set the default kernel or lengthen the menu display time to give you more time to choose. There is a link in my signature line on how to install and use it.

Once you have booted to a different kernel, verify the kernel in use with "uname -r". You can then go into synaptic and remove the unused kernel. Search or otherwise locate the kernel. The package will start with "linux-image" and followed with the kernel number. You can remove it and the associated linux-header file. If you remove it via synaptic your menu.lst will automatically be updated.

u should be able to remove the kernel without a reboot, but once u reboot u'd better have a good working kernel..

Aramaz
October 1st, 2008, 09:09 PM
Thank you, I managed to remove them with synaptics :)