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hungryOrb
September 19th, 2008, 02:22 AM
Hihi,
I'm running dual-boot at the moment with XP. However, recently, in windows I've started receiving an error message saying something about services.. After clicking 'Don't send' regarding the error report to microsoft, I get a RPC shutdown. If I abort it, it makes the machine run badly, if I don't it'll reset. Now I admit, I neglected to solve this problem, but everytime I wanted to shutdown the computer, I simply held the power button down to kill. And one day I turn on the laptop and when windows starts loading (the black screen with windows logo and load bar) I get a 0.5 second blue screen with some numericals and then it resets, and the cycle continues, unless I load Ubuntu <3
So I guess, firstly, just wondering if anyone has experienced this? And secondly, is it safe for me to mount the windows volume if it didn't shutdown properly? I know I'd have to force it, although not entirely sure how..
Thanks for consideration :D
Robin

jbrown96
September 19th, 2008, 02:33 AM
Not sure about the RPC problem. There shouldn't be any harm in mounting the directory. You would use
sudo mount -t auto /dev/sda2 /media/disk/ to mount it normally. Replace /dev/sda2 and /media/disk/ as needed. If it won't let you mount simply append
-o force to the end of the last command

hungryOrb
September 19th, 2008, 04:48 AM
Not sure about the RPC problem. There shouldn't be any harm in mounting the directory. You would use
sudo mount -t auto /dev/sda2 /media/disk/ to mount it normally. Replace /dev/sda2 and /media/disk/ as needed. If it won't let you mount simply append
-o force to the end of the last command

Thanks JBrown! :D
It doesn't find /media/disk/ though. Could you tell me how the drive is identified please? The windows installation is installed on G: and is NTFS.

nowshining
September 19th, 2008, 04:50 AM
create the folder disk in /media/

sudo mkdir /media/disk or whatever u want to call it and rename disk/ in the command given to the name of the folder you chose..

hungryOrb
September 19th, 2008, 05:55 AM
create the folder disk in /media/

sudo mkdir /media/disk or whatever u want to call it and rename disk/ in the command given to the name of the folder you chose..

Thanks NS, not sure I understand though. Create a folder to mount? how does that folder gain the contents of the drive I want to mount? Arg. Not too techy minded sorry.

Elfy
September 19th, 2008, 06:39 AM
Once the folder is created (with mkdir) the mount command mounts the drive into the folder you specify and the contents of the drive will be inside the folder.

For example /media/disk/windows/system32 - bearing in mind that spaces in windows folder names cause small changes.
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount

hungryOrb
September 19th, 2008, 06:50 AM
Once the folder is created (with mkdir) the mount command mounts the drive into the folder you specify and the contents of the drive will be inside the folder.

For example /media/disk/windows/system32 - bearing in mind that spaces in windows folder names cause small changes.
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount

Ahh thanks. But what about the drive? It it exclusively called with /dev/sda2/ ? Or is it possible it could be called something else?

Elfy
September 19th, 2008, 06:53 AM
Oh yes - it could be called a number of things - asssuming you have mad the folder, run this command from a terminal


sudo fdisk -l

you will get a list of all your partitions - whichever one you want to mount - replace sda2 to with that. If you're unsure post the output here

hungryOrb
September 19th, 2008, 09:02 AM
Oh yes - it could be called a number of things - asssuming you have mad the folder, run this command from a terminal


sudo fdisk -l

you will get a list of all your partitions - whichever one you want to mount - replace sda2 to with that. If you're unsure post the output here

Thanks thanks. So useful! :)

bumanie
September 19th, 2008, 09:11 AM
Forestpixie is correct; post the output of
sudo fdisk -lYou need to put that into terminal and then hit enter, then put in your password and hit enter again. Cut and paste the output to the forum. The previous posters were guessing which partition windows is on. The output of sudo fdisk -l will provide us with that precise information, then someone can help. You get to terminal by going to Applications --> Accessories --> Terminal.

hungryOrb
September 24th, 2008, 06:29 AM
Forestpixie is correct; post the output of You need to put that into terminal and then hit enter, then put in your password and hit enter again. Cut and paste the output to the forum. The previous posters were guessing which partition windows is on. The output of sudo fdisk -l will provide us with that precise information, then someone can help. You get to terminal by going to Applications --> Accessories --> Terminal.

Thanks, was able to get the info.
Another question, 'sudo fdisk -l' doesn't show the space used. Or at least, not in MB/GB. Is there a way to tell?
Am trying to re-install windows, but I can't identify the correct partition at which to overwrite the old.. HMM!

Elfy
September 24th, 2008, 07:20 AM
df -h will show you in humna readable format the space used/free on mounted drives

hungryOrb
September 24th, 2008, 07:37 AM
df -h will show you in humna readable format the space used/free on mounted drives


Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1 47G 24G 21G 53% /
varrun 505M 232K 505M 1% /var/run
varlock 505M 0 505M 0% /var/lock
udev 505M 64K 505M 1% /dev
devshm 505M 116K 505M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 505M 38M 468M 8% /lib/modules/2.6.24-18-generic/volatile
/dev/sda5 464M 82M 358M 19% /boot
/dev/sda6 9.3G 7.4G 1.5G 84% /home
gvfs-fuse-daemon 47G 24G 21G 53% /home/gen/.gvfs
/dev/scd0 688M 688M 0 100% /media/cdrom0
/dev/sda3 75G 29G 47G 39% /media/disk-1


Thanks! Just wondering here, is /dev/sda1 and gffs-fuse-daemon the same partition? And in the winxp setup it recognises the partitions by drive letter. Is there a way to emulate the way drives are assessed to judge which partition is ok to rewrite in XP? I realise that size would be fine, in which case all I'd be looking for was a partition that is 75g.. but!
OK brb!

Elfy
September 24th, 2008, 07:57 AM
I'm not really very sure about the gvfs - but suffice it to say for the moment that it is reporting your sda1

With a combination of sudo fdisk -l and df -h youi should be able to work out which is which.

It's likely that you could resize sda1 and have a partition availbale for xp, but it also depends to some extent on where on the disk partitions are physically positioned. Running gparted would give you that in all likelihood, you can install it on your buntu - but wouldn't be able to work from there though.

bab1
September 24th, 2008, 08:52 AM
gvfs-fuse-daemon 47G 24G 21G 53% /home/gen/.gvfs

This is the Gnome virtual file system. It is used to allow non Gnome aware apps to run in the Gnome userspace