PDA

View Full Version : program to learn linux commands



trash
September 16th, 2008, 03:28 AM
No idea where to post this so i'll start here and see what people think first.
I signed up on the Linux training partner (http://ubuntu.savoirfairelinux.com/elearning/)site to see what it's all about... very cool indeed!

I started the preview of the test and was able to answer but 1 of the first 5 command questions... i have a terrible memory! Repetition is the easiest way for me to learn and i know this from my last driving exam which I aced because of a msdos driving test program i found that provided a test that asked random questions. I repeated the test until my score was a consistant 100%. Whether or not this is actually cheating is another thread but feel free to comment lol.(for the record in 25 years of driving i have had one speeding ticket and one accident that was in no way my fault so i do actually know how to drive)

anyhow, I was wondering if such a program exists for linux commands and if not is there anybody out there who can provide the code for such a program?

LaRoza
September 16th, 2008, 03:36 AM
It is called a terminal.

Use it, and you will learn. ;)

trash
September 16th, 2008, 03:45 AM
It is called a terminal.

Use it, and you will learn. ;)

the problem with that is you are talking A LOT of trial and error and a whole whack of time that people are already hard pressed for, obviously that is one way but i am looking for another. I also think it would be a heck of a lot easier for people to accomplish stuff knowing the commands before they go into a terminal, rather than learning when they are trying to get something to work... also it's the repetition aspect i am looking at... I doubt the average user uses more than say 15-20+/- commands so that is probably all they will learn.

LaRoza
September 16th, 2008, 03:47 AM
the problem with that is you are talking A LOT of trial and error and a whole whack of time that people are already hard pressed for, obviously that is one way but i am looking for another. I also think it would be a heck of a lot easier for people to accomplish stuff knowing the commands before they go into a terminal, rather than learning when they are trying to get something to work... also it's the repetition aspect i am looking at... I doubt the average user uses more than say 15-20+/- commands so that is probably all they will learn.

The terminal is very diverse, There are inbuilt commands and external programs.

There is also a scripting language for each shell. I suggest you check out my wiki http://laroza77.wikidot.com/linux for shell programming.

Brunellus
September 16th, 2008, 04:07 AM
the problem with that is you are talking A LOT of trial and error and a whole whack of time that people are already hard pressed for, obviously that is one way but i am looking for another. I also think it would be a heck of a lot easier for people to accomplish stuff knowing the commands before they go into a terminal, rather than learning when they are trying to get something to work... also it's the repetition aspect i am looking at... I doubt the average user uses more than say 15-20+/- commands so that is probably all they will learn.
The main problem is that people are terminal-averse to begin with, so they only turn to the terminal during periods of stress.

For practice that did not require root access, it should be possible to set up a user account with relatively limited privileges. You could hack away to your heart's content there.

If the exercise calls for root access, it should be entirely possible to build a virtual machine with no GUI and use that as a sandbox for learning.

FuturePilot
September 16th, 2008, 04:37 AM
I think the best way to learn commands is through experience. That's pretty much how I leaned all the commands I know. Just play around with the terminal. It's fun :)

sertse
September 16th, 2008, 05:55 AM
http://inx.maincontent.net/

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=859914 (Our thread in ubuntuforums)

You can try out INX (Is Not X, as there is no Xorg). It's a distro with the aim to teaching people more about the command line, and more generally to provide a CLI "desktop linux"

Included is a ubuntu mininal install plus a series of tutorials/exercises that teach you the command line in an interactive manner. It also includes common text based programs that allow you to perfom various computing tasks (office, web, multimedia).

trash
September 16th, 2008, 06:22 AM
The terminal is very diverse, There are inbuilt commands and external programs.

There is also a scripting language for each shell. I suggest you check out my wiki http://laroza77.wikidot.com/linux for shell programming.

Great page! Diverse indeed, the scope of such a project just grew 5-10 fold.:lolflag:

Here's how i see a start, a simple program that runs a series of inbuilt shell command questions. beginner(the basics maybe 20 questions), intermediate 20-40 and so on.
External programs could be another test, same with scripting languages.

I'm not disputing experience as a means to learn, i'm talking about another tool/means to learn... seeing as such a tool is being used already by the driving licence bureau of Canada(or maybe just Quebec, not sure) I can vouch for it's success as a teaching tool.

trash
September 16th, 2008, 06:31 AM
The main problem is that people are terminal-averse to begin with, so they only turn to the terminal during periods of stress.

For practice that did not require root access, it should be possible to set up a user account with relatively limited privileges. You could hack away to your heart's content there.

If the exercise calls for root access, it should be entirely possible to build a virtual machine with no GUI and use that as a sandbox for learning.

I agree, thats why i think a simple test that new linux users can run in their sparetime, that would teach them 5-10-20 of the basic commands, in a low stress 15-20 minutes would be way better.

trash
September 16th, 2008, 06:45 AM
looks like it's not only in Canada i think this one is for the States


The Official DSA Theory Test for Drivers of Large Vehicles
CD-ROM
Author: Driving Standards Agency (DSA)
Published: 22 Feb 2006
Essential software for learner LGV and PCV drivers. This is the only official CD-ROM which includes the entire bank of DSA theory test questions for drivers of large vehicles and explains the answers.

It is written by the Driving Standards Agency, the people who set the tests.This CD-ROM is valid for tests taken from 3rd April 2006 and has been updated to include questions on avoiding and dealing with congestion, environmental issues, insurance and the new vehicle licensing regulations.

This CD-ROM will help you to prepare for the multiple choice part of the theory test.

http://torrentbox.com/torrent_details?id=38593