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jdong
September 14th, 2008, 10:34 PM
I had someone over today, and I was in the middle of a few quick code hacking projects, and he took one look at my setup and remarked that I wasn't using my OS properly.

I thought to myself... "this is how I use all my OSes" :D

fballem
September 14th, 2008, 10:38 PM
I had someone over today, and I was in the middle of a few quick code hacking projects, and he took one look at my setup and remarked that I wasn't using my OS properly.

I thought to myself... "this is how I use all my OSes" :D

What are the applications that you're using - it looks like a very heavy duty development environment. By the way, I'm assuming that your friend was joking. Even in Windows, the multiple windows are pretty common.

jdong
September 14th, 2008, 10:41 PM
What are the applications that you're using - it looks like a very heavy duty development environment. By the way, I'm assuming that your friend was joking. Even in Windows, the multiple windows are pretty common.

That is OS X 10.5 running Geany, gnome-terminal, baobab, and bzr-gtk's visualize mode within X11.app.

He meant I was using my Mac as a Linux/BSD box. Well, that's true -- I love these apps that I've grown accustomed to and the first thing I do on any new OS is to try to bring along my favorite apps. OS X does a pretty decent job of being UNIX enough that these trivially compiled, and the window manager ties X11 apps and native apps together fairly well, too. As far as native Cocoa/Aqua apps, there's a few that I like but nothing that replaces these tried-and-true X11 apps I use.

I haven't made a final decision yet of what host OS to run on this brand new iMac but I am right now leaning towards OS X.

t0p
September 14th, 2008, 10:44 PM
Even in Windows, the multiple windows are pretty common.

Hence the name. :)

DrMega
September 14th, 2008, 10:46 PM
I had someone over today, and I was in the middle of a few quick code hacking projects, and he took one look at my setup and remarked that I wasn't using my OS properly.

I thought to myself... "this is how I use all my OSes" :D

If it works for you, then you're using it properly. It's that simple.

pp.
September 14th, 2008, 10:49 PM
Hence the name. :)

Speaking of names: I suppose you realise that the screen shot shows what I take to be your real name?

lisati
September 14th, 2008, 10:53 PM
If it works for you, then you're using it properly. It's that simple.

+1

I wonder if the OP's associate wants a return to a single-tasking system like early MS-DOS or CP/M (and yes, I have a copy of CP/M lurking around for a couple of Commodore 128s that are currently gathering dust in my spare room)

LaRoza
September 14th, 2008, 11:00 PM
jdong is someone who likes OS X, be gentle to him.

As for the apps he has open, it is very Mac-ish isn't it? All GUI's and pretty.

Here is a (GUI) *nix:

http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/3208/200809141759531680x1050ew9.th.png (http://img227.imageshack.us/my.php?image=200809141759531680x1050ew9.png)

LaRoza
September 14th, 2008, 11:02 PM
I haven't made a final decision yet of what host OS to run on this brand new iMac but I am right now leaning towards OS X.

Well, you could do a bit of work like adding some hard disks, more RAM, perhaps a new fan and a DVD +RW with Lightscribe and really get it souped up. Oh, wait. Never mind...

In all seriousness, does the iMac have a optical drive at all? Like a laptop?

phrostbyte
September 14th, 2008, 11:06 PM
I had someone over today, and I was in the middle of a few quick code hacking projects, and he took one look at my setup and remarked that I wasn't using my OS properly.

I thought to myself... "this is how I use all my OSes" :D

I noticed that you also call the directory with all your projects "code". Great minds think alike! :)

LaRoza
September 14th, 2008, 11:14 PM
I noticed that you also call the directory with all your projects "code". Great minds think alike! :)



~$cat .bashrc | grep "code"
alias code='cd /media/STORAGE/code/'
alias ccode='cd /media/STORAGE/cCode/'
alias py='cd /media/STORAGE/code/pythonCode/'
~$code && ls
aaTools adaCode assemblyCode bash batch cCode cppCode forthCode fortranCode haskellCode javaCode lispCode markup others pascalCode perlCode pythonCode rubyCode tclCode vbsCode
/media/STORAGE/code$

jdong
September 14th, 2008, 11:36 PM
Well, you could do a bit of work like adding some hard disks, more RAM, perhaps a new fan and a DVD +RW with Lightscribe and really get it souped up. Oh, wait. Never mind...

In all seriousness, does the iMac have a optical drive at all? Like a laptop?

Yes, silly, it has a DVD+/-RW DL drive :)

beercz
September 15th, 2008, 12:14 AM
I wonder what he considers using his OS properly is. :confused:

david_lynch
September 15th, 2008, 12:16 AM
jdong is someone who likes OS X, be gentle to him.

As for the apps he has open, it is very Mac-ish isn't it? All GUI's and pretty.

Here is a (GUI) *nix:

http://img227.imageshack.us/img227/3208/200809141759531680x1050ew9.th.png (http://img227.imageshack.us/my.php?image=200809141759531680x1050ew9.png) LOL no, that's a unix GUI from the late 80s early 90s.

jdong
September 15th, 2008, 12:22 AM
I wonder what he considers using his OS properly is. :confused:

Probably iTunes and iWorks and iEdit and .... (sees hoards of flaming angry Mac fanboys lining up at his door...)

ChanServ
September 15th, 2008, 12:47 AM
I had someone over today, and I was in the middle of a few quick code hacking projects, and he took one look at my setup and remarked that I wasn't using my OS properly.

I thought to myself... "this is how I use all my OSes" :D

thats a lot of storage you got there :P

C!oud
September 15th, 2008, 12:58 AM
I had something similar happen when I used the command line on my friends window xp computer and he started freaking out thinking I was going to destroy his computer and erase all his data and yelling at me for not knowing how to use a computer. That was the last time I ever helped him set up his home network....

lisati
September 15th, 2008, 01:02 AM
I had something similar happen when I used the command line on my friends window xp computer and he started freaking out thinking I was going to destroy his computer and erase all his data and yelling at me for not knowing how to use a computer. That was the last time I ever helped him set up his home network....

I once made a comment to a family member who has used Windows a lot longer than I have about not using Windows. The reply: "What's Windows?"

jdong
September 15th, 2008, 01:05 AM
thats a lot of storage you got there :P

Haha, that's not real. Sparse loopback images have deceptive sizes and there's a few virtual filesystems mounted that baobab doesn't understand.

LaRoza
September 15th, 2008, 01:21 AM
Yes, silly, it has a DVD+/-RW DL drive :)

I have two of them in my desktop. One is Lighscribe enabled. I also have two hard disks and an extra fan to keep things airy.

Is it part of the unit or separate?


LOL no, that's a unix GUI from the late 80s early 90s.

No, that is xmonad with vim, bzr, and mc. Xmonad, a modern tiling window manager written in Haskell. Vim, the best text editor. mc, a file manager that kicks all the "GUI" ones in the rear. bzr, the Canonical created version control system, used from the command line like, instead of a GUI like the Mac boy. :-)


Probably iTunes and iWorks and iEdit and .... (sees hoards of flaming angry Mac fanboys lining up at his door...)

Tell them Apple is releasing a new item, called the "iWait" and they will get in line at the nearest Apple store until it is released.

(The follow up product will be the "iScrewedCustomersAgainByRapidlyDroppingThePrice")

jdong
September 15th, 2008, 01:28 AM
I have two of them in my desktop. One is Lighscribe enabled. I also have two hard disks and an extra fan to keep things airy.

Is it part of the unit or separate?


It's a part of the unit, on the right hand side.




No, that is xmonad with vim, bzr, and mc. Xmonad, a modern tiling window manager written in Haskell. Vim, the best text editor. mc, a file manager that kicks all the "GUI" ones in the rear. bzr, the Canonical created version control system, used from the command line like, instead of a GUI like the Mac boy. :-)

Well, I usually use bzr at the command line except for merge ancestry graphing which is more informative when viewed in a GUI.

LaRoza
September 15th, 2008, 01:30 AM
It's a part of the unit, on the right hand side.

Neat. That is a very usable design those iMac's. If it weren't for their price, I bet they could be the most common home computer (or if a similiar design using another OS)

MaxIBoy
September 15th, 2008, 01:35 AM
I wonder how usable DarwinBSD is without the Mac part.

jdong
September 15th, 2008, 01:37 AM
I wonder how usable DarwinBSD is without the Mac part.

Due to a lack of interest and Hackintosh jerks abusing the Darwin distribution to make home-brew pirated OS X breeds, Apple no longer releases a distribution of Darwin and there seems to be little demand to making a Darwin OS.

I think it comes down to the fact that on non-Apple hardware, there's not much point to using Darwin over using another BSD-like OS. A lot of what defines Darwin is its tight integration and flawless support of the Apple hardware. Other than that, it's a slow-context-switching UNIX with poor hardware support.

cookieofdoom
September 15th, 2008, 02:42 AM
I'd probably separate a few of those windows out to multiple desktops to save space. Although, if you're used to the scale plugin in Compiz Fusion (Exposť in Mac) it might not be necessary. I never could get quite used to it.

Anyway, Windows users always seem to only like 1-2 windows open at a time. It drives me nuts when I see them close stuff they're just going to need later to "save memory".

jdong
September 15th, 2008, 02:58 AM
I'd probably separate a few of those windows out to multiple desktops to save space. Although, if you're used to the scale plugin in Compiz Fusion (Exposť in Mac) it might not be necessary. I never could get quite used to it.

Anyway, Windows users always seem to only like 1-2 windows open at a time. It drives me nuts when I see them close stuff they're just going to need later to "save memory".

Rest assured, the other desktops are actually in-use by various more important tasks at hand (i.e. homework, calendar, forums/launchpad browser windows, etc)

I do use per-app and per-desktop expose extensively; it's an absolute must-have feature for me!

chris4585
September 15th, 2008, 03:16 AM
I didn't know there was a right way to use a OS

I for one use my computers very specifically and tend to not follow the lines of default look/layout

I have my windows list at the top, my launchers at the bottom (almost like a dock, but its just a panel with launchers), and its not fully extended so i can easily switch my desktops with compiz

I have the same layout with gnome and openbox for the same reason, switching desktops easily

Trail
September 15th, 2008, 09:08 AM
I noticed that you also call the directory with all your projects "code". Great minds think alike! :)

Thank you. Been meaning to think of a good name instead of 'projects', but never bothered.