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piran
September 4th, 2008, 02:44 PM
Wryly expect it's all probably my own fault but I *am*
having myriad difficulties getting ubuntu installed...
and I fondly expected it to be a little easier;~/

Existing W2kPro-SP4 workstation should dual boot but
ubuntu seemingly has disappeared without trace. The
workstation boots into w2k without offering ubuntu.

Have gone through the ubuntu 8.04 ALTERNATE install -
ISO downloaded OK - burnt at a subnormal speed (after
lurking through a few apposite postings) - internal
'check CD option' also completes testing successfully.
Opted for the given 'Guided install' though was some
what surprised it chose an external FireWire box for
use as the SWAP drive. Though the workstation is not
a 'RAID' box there are a good many connected drives.

The installer appropriately discovered the M$ OS
during its GRUB phase and was given permission to
suitably amend the MBR. I should now state that
Acronis TrueImage 11 has made prior use of the MBR
for its own necessary purpose. Possibly it is this
that is causing the no-show of the installed ubuntu?

Would appreciate advice as to what I might now do;~)

----best wishes, Robert

dstew
September 4th, 2008, 03:54 PM
We need to do a little detective work to figure out how your system is currently configured before attempting a repair. Do you have an Ubuntu Live CD that you can boot? We can use some software on the Live CD system to analyse the problem.

piran
September 4th, 2008, 04:01 PM
The LiveCD ran 'sort of' OK a day or two ago.
I attempted to use its install functionality
but kept getting 'error 141' in Guided mode
and all sorts of stuff in manual modes. So
that's why I'm now down to the ALTERNATE cd.
My belief is that the installer is incorrectly
doing the GRUB phase and possibly attributing
inappropriate 'spare' drives and/or capacity.
Am now back in W2k licking my wounds;~/
----best wishes, Robert

piran
September 4th, 2008, 04:12 PM
How do I securely/privately get a GIF file to you?
Snapshot of the manage layer of w2k's view of the drives.
----best wishes, Robert

[postedit: sent the GIF to the email address of your cpu place]

dstew
September 4th, 2008, 04:50 PM
I see the picture. There are five drives, and it looks like the partitions that do not have a Windows-recognizable file system might be the Linux partitions. However, you can see that we will not be able to use the Windows tools to analyze the disks, because Windows will not cooperate in any way witn non-Windows file systems.

I understand that you were having a hard time installing from the Live CD. I asked you about the Live CD not to install, but to use the Live CD system to analyze your system. The Linux tools will be able to detect and analyze both Windows and Linux file systems, while Windows can only detect and analyze Windows file systems.

Here is what I recommend as a first step. Boot the Ubuntu Live CD. Start the Terminal application (Applications --> Accessories --> Terminal). On the terminal command line enter
sudo fdisk -lThe output will be all the disks and partitions on your system that Linux can detect. Post the output to the forum.

piran
September 4th, 2008, 04:54 PM
(posts crossed... now preparing a Live CD boot session...
unfortunately I have external commitments within the hour)

The workstation is a production W2kPro-SP4 installation.

ASUS motherboard support both SATA and PATA drives.
Between the BIOS running order, M$'s take on the drive
running order and finally Linux's take on the same all
adds up to organised hell. From my POV the OS should
handle the drives and just leave me the task of filling
them up with content;~) It's a running PC and ubuntu
is welcome to whatever capacity and drives it wants as
long as it does so appropriately ie non-destructively.

Confusingly the SATA drives are not attributed as being
primary or secondary and are attributed 'after' PATA
drives. Then the BIOS switches the boot order, which
changes the way M$ sees the drive order. Finally Linux
confusingly sees the drives in a different way too.

I had pre-arranged a 'spare' partition on the drive
used by the M$ OS and even formatted it with EXT3.
But the installer's 'Guided' mode seems to have just
ignored it. I thought it would be the best drive as it
would predicate an optimum location for GRUB.

Believe a likely resolution would be best found by
killing the ubuntu installer and manually placing drives
myself. With this in mind what are its requirements?
A partition of what capacity, on any particular drive
or controller and with what sort of mount( / or /root)?
Also a SWAP drive with similar queries?

----best wishes, Robert

piran
September 4th, 2008, 05:12 PM
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 300.0 GB, 300090728448 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 36483 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x096f7846

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 21690 174224893+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda2 * 35847 36483 5116702+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 31710 35846 33230452+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda4 21691 31709 80477617+ 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 21691 31295 77152131 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 31296 31709 3325423+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xc36af073

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 * 1 52383 420766416 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdb2 52384 60801 67617585 5 Extended
/dev/sdb5 52384 60801 67617553+ bc Unknown

Disk /dev/sdc: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x2c02ec94

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 * 1 3916 31455238+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdc2 3917 82251 629225887+ f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sdc3 82252 121601 316078875 83 Linux
/dev/sdc5 3917 69192 524329438+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdc6 69193 82251 104896386 b W95 FAT32

Disk /dev/sdd: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00032780

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 121601 976760001 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sde: 250.9 GB, 250999209984 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30515 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x032320ec

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sde1 1 30515 245111706 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sdf: 250.9 GB, 250999209984 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30515 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x196f15e4

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdf1 1 21763 174811266 b W95 FAT32
/dev/sdf2 21764 30515 70300440 5 Extended
/dev/sdf5 21764 30153 67392643+ 83 Linux
/dev/sdf6 30154 30515 2907733+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$

piran
September 4th, 2008, 05:20 PM
Am now logged on thread using the LiveCD.
Previous posting shows the requested output.
What you see there that isn't particularly M$
is probably the detritus of all the failed install
attempts. I had earlier pre-prepared a 300GB
EXT3 partition for use by ubuntu and another
approx 30GB SWAP partition elsewhere. The
'Guided' installer hasn't appeared to be on
the same wavelength... I think some manual
intervention might repair the failed auto
installation. I've no email running on this
LiveCD iteration though the server will of
course hold any such until I regain full
control of operations;|)
best wishes, Robert

piran
September 4th, 2008, 06:16 PM
Need to normalise the workstation before my departure.
Will resume later tonight or else tomorrow morning.
----best wishes, Robert

dstew
September 4th, 2008, 10:12 PM
I agree the guided installation is not a good idea when you have as many disks as you have. I never use it to install Ubuntu.

I always prepare a root partition and a swap partition using the Gnome Partition Editor before I run the installer. It just gives me a feeling of security during the installation. 30 Gb is enough for the root partition, and 1 Gb for swap. You only have to create the partitions, there is no need to format them.

After you create the partitions, use the manual installation method. When you get to the partitioning step, you just pick the previously prepared partition for the root mount point (designated '/') and format it ext3. Note the Linux name of the partition (you can check using fdisk like you did above, to avoid confusion. Linux detects and names disks and partitions differently from Windows, and might number them differently than your BIOS). Select the previously set aside swap partition, and designate it "Use as swap". You do not have to format the swap partition. It should install the system fine at this point.

If you want to use the grub boot loader, you can install it into the MBR of the first disk. However, with the mix of disks you have, grub might get confused (actually it is the grub installer that gets confused). It is better to install grub by hand after the Linux OS is in. I can help you do that. If you want to install grub by hand, click the Advanced tab at the grub-install step, and choose not to install the boot loader.