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StOoZ
August 24th, 2008, 10:19 PM
Why do you prefer ubuntu linux , over the other distributions?

I'll start : im quite new to linux (switched completely from windows to linux in march this year) , I was suggested to use ubuntu by my friend , so this is how its started.

what about you folks? :KS

Bachstelze
August 24th, 2008, 10:23 PM
Fast, simple, gets the job done.

The same could be said about a few others (Debian or Slackware, especially), but I like Ubuntu above them for its larger repositories.

youthforlinux
August 24th, 2008, 10:25 PM
Fast, simple, gets the job done.

The same could be said about a few others (Debian or Slackware, especially), but I like Ubuntu above them for its larger repositories.

Agreed. Totally no bloat, large amount of software available for free, and does what i want, when i want.

lzfy
August 24th, 2008, 10:33 PM
Indeed no bloat, great community, a lot of packages available and easy to use. That's the reason why I'm still using Kubuntu even though there are other distro's available which deliver better KDE experience.

SuperSonic4
August 24th, 2008, 10:34 PM
These forums and the vast community knowledge in general. I prefer KDE so I'm using Kubuntu plus I think Amarok is amazing

cardinals_fan
August 24th, 2008, 10:36 PM
I don't. I'm using Slackware until OpenSolaris matures enough for me to switch over.

I have serious difficulty with the claim that Ubuntu has no bloat. GNOME is bloat in my book :)

lukjad007
August 24th, 2008, 10:43 PM
Fast, simple, gets the job done.

The same could be said about a few others (Debian or Slackware, especially), but I like Ubuntu above them for its larger repositories.
+1
And also for the community and these forums. It really just makes you feel right at home.

Bachstelze
August 24th, 2008, 10:44 PM
I have serious difficulty with the claim that Ubuntu has no bloat. GNOME is bloat in my book :)

I don't use Gnome.

Hilipatti
August 24th, 2008, 10:48 PM
There isn't any great reason for me really, I don't care about the distro so much, but I do care about the following things:

1)I want to have all the software I need readily available from the repo's. Going all "FFFFREEEEDDDDOOOMMM" over stuff doesn't really matter much to me, I just need to get my job done and sometimes you have to compromise a bit. Mainly this just means that I want the codecs without having to resort to getting them from some 3rd party repository. I download my nvidia drivers from their site because I want to use the bleeding edge ones. Well, actually, I do care about open source and open standards a great deal.. It's just that I think the repositories should be a somewhat neutral place if having the packages readily available doesn't pose a great legal or whatever risk. I believe people should freely have the choice to use the software they want. That's what's linux is about, really. If open source alternatives are possible, I'll use them. But for the meanwhile, I'm using the nvidia drivers and questionable codecs.

2) I like apt. RPM's aren't as nice. I don't really have experience with anything else, maybe I'll try.

I just like the big repositories in Ubuntu. And the questionable packages that are offered anyway.

I don't really care which distro I'm using otherwise, because I strip gnome down to essentials and only install the programs I use. And I'm thinking about just starting to use Openbox, we'll see. All the distros are the same under the hood, but if you are just a normal "basic" desktop user, there are differences (Ubuntu's ease of use of course etc.)

cardinals_fan
August 24th, 2008, 10:48 PM
I don't use Gnome.
Of course, I COULD do an Ubuntu minimal install, but by that time I might as well just use Slack :)

fissionmailed
August 24th, 2008, 10:52 PM
Of course, I COULD do an Ubuntu minimal install, but by that time I might as well just use Slack :)

I do a min install than then install openbox and a few other apps and then add what I want and use. I really should compile a list of what I in stall when I do that...

voteforpedro36
August 24th, 2008, 10:52 PM
I don't, but if I did for whatever reason I didn't like Arch, then it would definitely be for the community.

OutOfReach
August 24th, 2008, 10:55 PM
Fast, easy, and a great community.
:popcorn:

d0b33
August 24th, 2008, 10:56 PM
I have always preferred Gnome over KDE since the redhat days actually so Ubuntu is just the perfect OS for me :)

Poor KDE folk making the transition over to KDE4 :popcorn:

billgoldberg
August 24th, 2008, 10:58 PM
The repos and the fact it is debian based.

I would most likely be using something else than Ubuntu if it weren't for the huge repos and this forum.

Bachstelze
August 24th, 2008, 10:59 PM
Of course, I COULD do an Ubuntu minimal install, but by that time I might as well just use Slack :)

That's why I mentioned Slack too ;) But you can't deny Ubuntu has much more packages readily available than Slack (whether you need them is of course another matter).


Poor KDE folk making the transition over to KDE4

My transition to KDE 4 is fine, thanks ;)

insane_alien
August 24th, 2008, 11:00 PM
'Just works'

now, don't get me wrong, i LOVE tinkering with the OS but i want it to be because i want to(bored) not because i need to to get a working OS with GUI etc. etc.

ubuntu does this very very well and works out of the box so to speak.

Swarms
August 24th, 2008, 11:02 PM
It was the first userfriendly linux based operating system I tried at that time.

It might as well have been Fedora or OpenSuse I tried before and got stuck with, but instead it was Ubuntu. As someone else said, it gets the job done.

calito
August 24th, 2008, 11:17 PM
Theres something about the feel of Ubuntu that I can't get enough of. I tried Fedora, OpenSuse, Parsix, Debian but I always end up coming back to Ubuntu. I just can't leave my baby. Haha

cardinals_fan
August 24th, 2008, 11:26 PM
That's why I mentioned Slack too ;) But you can't deny Ubuntu has much more packages readily available than Slack (whether you need them is of course another matter).
Very true. I have an aversion to Debian-based distros (Stop adulterating your packages! Leave them vanilla!).

tel93
August 24th, 2008, 11:28 PM
[QUOTE=HymnToLife;5656716]Fast, simpleQUOTE]

Are you sure you're talking about Ubuntu?

d0b33
August 24th, 2008, 11:32 PM
My transition to KDE 4 is fine, thanks ;)

I was only kidding, honest ;)

Bachstelze
August 25th, 2008, 01:00 AM
[QUOTE=HymnToLife;5656716]Fast, simpleQUOTE]

Are you sure you're talking about Ubuntu?

*checks*


firas@ana ~ % cat /etc/issue
Ubuntu intrepid (development branch) \n \l

firas@ana ~ % lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu intrepid (development branch)
Release: 8.10
Codename: intrepid


This looks very much like Ubuntu, doesn't it?

snova
August 25th, 2008, 01:11 AM
I initially used Debian because the tutorial on linux.org showed how to install it, and it said that Debian had a lot of packages. After I got caught up in Linux, I noticed Ubuntu was based on Debian but updated more frequently (and it had a binary fglrx!), so I switched.

I stay partially because of the restricted component (I never want to try compiling fglrx again, or anything relating to the kernel for that matter- it never really works). In addition, there's the simple fact that a lot of other people use it. More users equates to better support, especially where more money is lacking (and Ubuntu has even that).

Ubuntu looks like it'll be around for a long time, so I stay where it's safe. I hope it does, because I couldn't stand to go back to Windows anymore.

I'm on KDE's side. I rebooted/reinstalled Debian several times until I figured out how to
install KDE instead (again, linux.org- but now that I know why I definitely won't switch). Unfortunately, I didn't see any option for this in the Ubuntu installer (or I didn't look closely enough for one), so I installed a command-line system and went from there. At the same time I avoided installing more than a dozen useless video drivers.

By the looks of it, Gnome hasn't changed much since then, at least appearance wise. The eye candy is another reason I like KDE. Plasmoids look much more promising, not to mention all the SVG.

Bachstelze
August 25th, 2008, 01:17 AM
(I never want to try compiling fglrx again, or anything relating to the kernel for that matter- it never really works)

It never really works for you. How do you think the Ubuntu devs create those packages? Magic?

cardinals_fan
August 25th, 2008, 01:46 AM
It never really works for you. How do you think the Ubuntu devs create those packages? Magic?
They learn it at Hogwarts...

geogur
August 25th, 2008, 02:26 AM
Something new to try. linux is a learning tool unless I try them all I won`t be happy. I have learned from the experience and will move on when something new catches my interest . But I do know it will be a linux distro.

C!oud
August 25th, 2008, 02:34 AM
I don't prefer Ubuntu over other distros but it was the perfect beginner distro for me and it has a great community :)

nickgaydos
August 25th, 2008, 02:36 AM
I prefer Ubuntu over other distrobutions because the community is helpful, the operating system is solid as a rock, the repositories are great and it got great reviews :-D

ArtF10
August 25th, 2008, 02:36 AM
- relatively new, so it does what I need it to do
- tremendous support
- LARGE repository<--- very few others(if any) come close

Woormy
August 25th, 2008, 02:41 AM
It's the supportive community. When you have a question, you just search. If you don't find an answer, you post. I've probably gotten a couple thousand dollars of free training and tech support that way.

StOoZ
August 25th, 2008, 05:23 AM
any reason why I dont see ubuntu in the industry (compared to SuSe , or FC ..etc..) , and usually only in home computers?? (i might no looking that good ... )

and indeed the community is amazing!

joninkrakow
August 25th, 2008, 07:26 AM
Unfortunately, my post is a bit long, but I hope it's enlightening. :-)

I first discovered Ubuntu last May, from, I think, Lifehacker. I downloaded the ISO, and burnt it on my Mac. I stuck it into my Pismo's internal drive and rebooted, and was shocked to see the system boot! I booted into 640x480, so I did a quick Google(R) search, and discovered these forums. I quickly had both a temporary fix, and a permanent repair that would hold over several boots. I played with some of the software, and longed for more and better stuff. At that moment, I discovered the Add/Remove app, and discovered a whole universe of software. I quickly discovered the options to add even more repos, and was amazed at the depth of things--first music and video software, then Bible study tools, and then photography tools. It wasn't all perfect, but there was something for everyone. Excited with how well it all worked, I decided it would be best to try out several distros. Now, my old Mac is a PPC computer, so I quickly discovered that many/most distros were not compatible. I did try downloading OpenSUSE and Yellow Dog Linux (a distro specifically for PPC). However, both required several discs! I tried SUSE first, and discovered that it didn't like my discs, despite the clean burns and checksum checks. :-( So I downloaded the net install. About a day later, with much fiddly installation choices, I had a working SUSE system. I tried to add software, but there was seemingly nothing in the repos. I tried adding more, but it wasn't at all easy! Worse, the fix for my screen wasn't nearly as easy, esp. as there was no help on forums. Yes, there were forums, but they were like a ghost town in comparison to Ubuntu's. So, I tried YDL. The install went much faster, with less confusion, but practically nothing worked! No sound, no network, couldn't update my system and the repos were even more bare than old mother hubbard's. And the fix for my monitor, while easier in the end, was harder to figure out! The forums were so empty that most posts were along the lines of--"Can someone help me?" followed up by "Please! Help!" from the same poster! Lots of questions, but no answers. So, I went back to Ubuntu. :-)

And in a nutshell, it's the community and the broad range of software, and the internet support that keeps me on Ubuntu. BTW, I also use Puppy Linux on my ancient Dell, and its community is capital also. :-)

Oh, and another reason to like Ubuntu--its hardware support seems to work on every computer I have thrown at it. I like how Ubuntu can be simple--boot from CD, and install--or as flexible--boot from install CD, run minimum install, and add only the bits and pieces you need, to keep things light and fresh--as you want or need. I have got a quite lean system on my old Dell--not Puppy, but quite lean and mean. Ubuntu is really excellent.

That said, I haven't seriously tried Fedora yet, but what I did with it looks great. Now, if only I hadn't accidently installed Darwin on my Fedora drive. ;-)

(and still, I've seen nothing to compare to this community)

-Jon

snova
August 28th, 2008, 02:35 AM
It never really works for you. How do you think the Ubuntu devs create those packages? Magic?

It certainly seems to require magic for anything relating to the kernel. Oh, compiling it it relatively straightforward, but the one time I tried it it wouldn't boot.

This is why I like Ubuntu- the restricted component frees me from this messy stuff.

In contrast, just earlier I installed VMware, and the installer built everything with no problems. All I did is tell it where the headers were (after I installed them). "The module loads into the running kernel perfectly"... It was like a godsend. I had expectations of spectacular failures from the point it said it would have to compile the modules itself.

But most of my experience with the kernel is from while I was using Debian, so I suppose things have improved since 4.0 (or whatever it was).

I say most- a few days ago I tried compiling the SquashFS module. I don't remember why. But I attempted to do it with an automated tool, the way it said to in the documentation, and it failed. But it was to to some kind of incompatibility- a missing define somewhere.

I don't remember what went wrong with fglrx.

Anyway... How do I think they do it? Well, they try a magic wand, a priest, and somebody higher up the hacker chain in turn, until something works.

Seriously, probably with those automated tools that I never got to see working.

(Even though I no longer need SquashFS, I'm delighted to see binaries in the repository. Furthur evidence, as if any was needed.)

swoll1980
August 28th, 2008, 04:02 AM
Debian based, best repos, best hardware detection(for me anyways) easiest to install (for me anyways) best gnome implementation (IMO) What else could you ask for?

kagashe
August 28th, 2008, 09:32 AM
Free CD shipped to home.
Cutting edge.
Great Community.
Popularity in the Linux world.
Easy availability of software in the repositories and otherwise .deb packages.

kagashe

ssam
August 28th, 2008, 10:37 AM
best command line experience with default settings
very good tab completion
sbin in PATH
sudo setup
command not found

synaptic is a great graphical package manager.

very easy to get involved with development and testing. you can listen to dev meetings on IRC, get daily test CDs, rss feeds of changes.

up to date software

handy tools like prevu, module-assistant

prompt security updates

stinger30au
August 28th, 2008, 11:33 AM
i found out Ubuntu thru some members of another forums totally unrelated to Linux.

started with 7.04

the thing that sold me, was the fact i could have my pc up and going in 20 minutes.

i did not after i installed the OS load up antivirus, antispyware, antihacker, anti trojan, amtimalware stuff to chew thru my cpu cycles and make my 3Ghz cpu run like a dog


Keep Kicking Goals Ubuntu team.

Remember, the sky is *NOT* the limit.... its just the beginning ;-)

AndyCooll
August 28th, 2008, 01:12 PM
Familiarity. I started out using Fedora but quickly switched to Ubuntu when I found everything just worked. Since then most of my Linux experience has been using Ubuntu, I'm comfortable using it, I know how it works, I get things done etc etc. I also have the support of this community. And I really have no strong or pressing desire to change.

I might tinker with Debian, Fedora or Arch for instance but for now I can do everything I want to do and do it easily using Ubuntu.

:cool:

tdrusk
August 28th, 2008, 02:20 PM
It's not as fast as Debian but the time I don't spend tweaking and configuring my computer makes up for the time it takes to open a program.

dspari1
August 28th, 2008, 02:25 PM
The Ubuntu repositories are so big, that I have never come across dependency hell. I can't say the same about any other distro.

dspari1
August 28th, 2008, 02:26 PM
I have always preferred Gnome over KDE since the redhat days actually so Ubuntu is just the perfect OS for me :)

Poor KDE folk making the transition over to KDE4 :popcorn:

KDE 4 is actually shaping up to be really nice after 4.1

d0b33
August 28th, 2008, 04:58 PM
KDE 4 is actually shaping up to be really nice after 4.1

I might give it another go in future then ;)

jonabyte
August 28th, 2008, 05:52 PM
It has one of the best communities around!

StOoZ
August 29th, 2008, 12:14 AM
I see that the community thing takes a large portion of ubuntu's popularity factor.

too bad ubuntu isnt that popular in the industry (Servers , etc.. or am I wrong here?)

cardinals_fan
August 29th, 2008, 12:58 AM
too bad ubuntu isnt that popular in the industry (Servers , etc.. or am I wrong here?)
I would never use Ubuntu on a server. For server deployments, a rock-solid OS is the best option - think Slackware, Debian, Red Hat, and CentOS (a RHEL clone).

EDIT: I forgot FreeBSD! Another great choice for a server.

PrimoTurbo
August 29th, 2008, 01:03 AM
I think Ubuntu is great for what it accomplishes, allowing normal users to use an Open Source OS. However lately I've been running Arch, because it allows me to configure my operating system the way I want. I have more control and I'm not forced to compile anything from scratch.

Sephoroth
August 29th, 2008, 01:24 AM
"Out of the box" readiness (When I'm not using betas :D), great and large community, large repositories and a good GNOME implementation. If I feel like using KDE-4 I tend to boot to OpenSuSE (yay for tri-boots?).

bomanizer
August 29th, 2008, 03:31 AM
I think Ubuntu is like Debian on steroids.

Mmm.. choices are made easy on Ubuntu. You want a 100% GPL OS? Ok, done. You want those videos to play and that wifi to work? Klik klik, done.

Fabulous.

Delever
August 29th, 2008, 09:01 AM
I got used to it.

MickS
August 29th, 2008, 10:54 AM
Loyalty, the Shipit CD made me try Ubuntu in the first place and now I'm here I love it and I see no need to try another distro, Ubuntu freed me from Microsoft.


Mick

BlueSkyNIS
August 29th, 2008, 11:23 AM
I prefer Ubuntu because of this lovely community ):P


Cheers :popcorn:

jespdj
August 29th, 2008, 01:34 PM
I had played with Linux in the past (started with Slackware on my 486 in 1994!), and about two years ago I decided I wanted to have another look.

I chose Ubuntu because it was (and is) the most popular Linux distro. It works, is user friendly, and I got used to it. And ofcourse there's a great community here.

I briefly tried Fedora but really didn't like it. In Fedora, installing codecs, Java etc. is more difficult than in Ubuntu, because they have a more strict "everything has to be free software" philosophy. I highly prefer free software to proprietary stuff, but I have to be practical too...