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KingBahamut
November 10th, 2005, 03:37 PM
CNN is reporting that IBM, Sony, and Philips are creating a Linux adoption group. Called the 'Open Invention Network', it is intended to protect vendors and customers from patent royalty fees while using OSS." From the article: "Patents owned by OIN will be available without payment of royalties to any company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert its patents against others who have signed a license with OIN, when using certain Linux-related software. Traditionally, patents have been pursued for two primary reasons -- to defend one's own intellectual property or for barter to trade in cross-licensing agreements to gain access to other companies' patents. OIN represents a new form of cross-licensing that its backers say could spur innovation."

External links --
http://money.cnn.com/2005/11/10/technology/linux.reut/index.htm

For conjectures sake, lets just say that Sony is on our side of the boat. Now if we assume that, then the whole DRM Rootkit mess could be seen as an attempt on Sony's Part to knock over MSwindows users. Yes , I know it sounds all consipiracy theory-ish. I had to try.

bored2k
November 10th, 2005, 03:42 PM
I kinda saw that one coming ever since Sony's boss stated a while ago that the PS3 as being made with the thought of using an OS (linux) in it (and the PS3 being done by Sony, IBM and Toshiba).

Brunellus
November 10th, 2005, 04:09 PM
I kinda saw that one coming ever since Sony's boss stated a while ago that the PS3 as being made with the thought of using an OS (linux) in it (and the PS3 being done by Sony, IBM and Toshiba).
sony aren't interested in end-user linux; they want linux as a cheap development platform. I can almost guarantee you that PS3 linux will require a proprietary Sony bootloader. The kernel, of course, will be free, as will all the usual gnu userland tools, but I'll bet you a cool beverage of your choice that the bootloader will be proprietary.

KingBahamut
November 10th, 2005, 04:21 PM
Well Id risk it for a Warm Room Temperature Pint.

But nothing less. =)

GeneralZod
November 10th, 2005, 04:32 PM
sony aren't interested in end-user linux; they want linux as a cheap development platform.

There's also an interesting trading law in some countries: consoles are classed as a "toy", and are thus taxed more heavily (or some charge is levied that raises the price). Having a full OS like Linux on it changes its legal status to "computer", thus eliminating this extra charge and reducing the sales price to something more acceptable to a consumer.

derrick1985
November 10th, 2005, 04:33 PM
All I can say is:


WOOHOO!

newbie2
November 10th, 2005, 04:54 PM
http://lxer.com/module/forums/t/19732/
:razz: :razz:

Stormy Eyes
November 10th, 2005, 05:01 PM
There's also an interesting trading law in some countries: consoles are classed as a "toy", and are thus taxed more heavily (or some charge is levied that raises the price).

That's wierd. I remember my SNES' owner's manual mentioning that the SNES was a "Class B computing device" according to the FCC's (US Federal Communications Commission) rules. Why would one country treat a game console as a computing device and another treat it as a toy?

newbie2
November 10th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Why would one country treat a game console as a computing device and another treat it as a toy?It is because "THE LAW" is not the same everywhere .... ;)
the 'case' of DVD Jon is an example of "why one country(Norway in his case)wouldn't sue him and other EU states would , at that time"...now they changed the IP law also there .
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/10/19/dvd_jon_job/

panickedthumb
November 10th, 2005, 05:28 PM
I don't think it's classified as a toy, per se, but I think the differences in classes are what change the taxes, etc. Class B devices are probably game consoles and the like.

Wolveen
November 10th, 2005, 05:38 PM
Very interesting, didnt IBM try to kill off Linux complaining that it was too much like Unix (AIX) and wanted some sort of liscening fee for all machines that ran Linux?

But seeing how electronics are going more and more into Linux based GUIs, this could be very interesting.
I know my router's chip even runs Linux.

GeneralZod
November 10th, 2005, 05:42 PM
I don't think it's classified as a toy, per se, but I think the differences in classes are what change the taxes, etc. Class B devices are probably game consoles and the like.

That sounds more sensible. I probably should have stated that this was second-hand knowledge taken from slashdot, so take it with a pinch of salt!


Very interesting, didnt IBM try to kill off Linux complaining that it was too much like Unix (AIX) and wanted some sort of liscening fee for all machines that ran Linux?


I have no idea if that was ever the case, but nowadays IBM are behind Linux in a big way. In fact, some observers have gone so far as to say that they have staked their future on it.

Nu-Buntu
November 10th, 2005, 05:48 PM
After the revelation of Sony's DRM Rootkit on music CDs, I don't trust them to be involved in any PC I own. They make Microsoft look like Mother Teresa.

poptones
November 10th, 2005, 05:57 PM
Sony-the-company-that-puts-rootkits-on-CDs is not the Sony-that-sells-computers-and-dvd-players. Sony Entertainment has often been at odds with Sony Electronics. Sony Electronics, for example, could have held a pretty nice market share with their portable minidisc recorders if they hadn't so hamstrung it with DRM hooks. This is just more of that... Sony cares about linux because they see it as an opportunity to exploit some free IP. I'll believe in this "open adoption network" when Sony release full details on the hardware acceleration features in its platform, for example.

newbie2
November 10th, 2005, 06:08 PM
Very interesting, didnt IBM try to kill off Linux complaining that it was too much like Unix (AIX) and wanted some sort of liscening fee for all machines that ran Linux?
i think that IBM was afraid that if they comitted themselfs to linux(that time) , they maybe would get tangled in a sort of SCO(UNIX)/IBM/OS2/MS-dos/window$ IP case

etc
November 10th, 2005, 06:49 PM
Sony better not see this as an oppertunity to pull the DRM **** in linux.

poptones
November 10th, 2005, 08:34 PM
Ummm... Linus Tovalds... you know, "Mr Linux," has said himself adding DRM to the kernel is not at all out of the question.

DRM can protect my rights and your rights as well. The way Sony has done this is not only unethical but in many states downright illegal, but that doesn't make all DRM unethical or illegal.

etc
November 10th, 2005, 09:29 PM
Ummm... Linus Tovalds... you know, "Mr Linux," has said himself adding DRM to the kernel is not at all out of the question.

DRM can protect my rights and your rights as well. The way Sony has done this is not only unethical but in many states downright illegal, but that doesn't make all DRM unethical or illegal.
There is good DRM and there is bad. Sony has already shown they want to take the latter and restrict everyone's rights.

Malphas
November 10th, 2005, 09:46 PM
I've yet to see any good DRM. Why should I care if a disc is released that has certain allowances for private copies when I can just bypass whatever copy protection method is present and decide for myself what is and isn't fair-use?

xequence
November 10th, 2005, 09:50 PM
When I think DRM and propriatory, I think of three companies: Apple, Microsoft, and Sony.

How can they do this when their MP3 players dont even support linux? (Cough, mine.)

And if any DRM gets onto linux, ill be the first one to considor BSD or Solaris, or some other OS.

etc
November 10th, 2005, 09:50 PM
I've yet to see any good DRM. Why should I care if a disc is released that has certain allowances for private copies when I can just bypass whatever copy protection method is present and decide for myself what is and isn't fair-use?
One of my favorite ideas for DRM was like a library system.

A library has a website, and they want to distribute ebooks. But they can't legal give away ebooks so they use DRM. The ebooks "return" themselves after a period of time, and then can be "renewed" for reading later.

Or say you have a document that you only want one person to see. You use DRM to make sure that person doesn't send it off to someone else.

But I agree, there hasn't been any good implementation of DRM lately.

poptones
November 10th, 2005, 10:13 PM
Let's see... BSD is the core of OS X and has also been borrowed from for Windows. Solaris... that's hilarious. Sun has long been touting java as a platform for DRM and even has an opendrm website about the project.

And it's not exactly going to be easy to "bypass whatever copy protection method is present" when that "protection" is built into the hardware. If this were so trivial as some make it sound then we would also have accelerated sound support in alsa for the nvidia MCP-T, and accelerated and "free" 3D graphics for virtually every accelerated 3D chipset out there. But we don't - because putting stuff in hardware changes the equation considerably.

How many YEARS were DVDs on the market before Jon "cracked" them?

xequence
November 10th, 2005, 11:31 PM
Let's see... BSD is the core of OS X and has also been borrowed from for Windows. Solaris... that's hilarious. Sun has long been touting java as a platform for DRM and even has an opendrm website about the project.

OSX is based on darwin, which is based on BSD.

It doesent matter anyway. If you make the ultimate DRM free OS and another company makes its own DRMed up version does that change the original in any way, shape, or form? Nope.

And as far as I know solaris and BSD both dont have any DRM in them, correct me if im wrong.

poofyhairguy
November 11th, 2005, 01:01 AM
then the whole DRM Rootkit mess could be seen as an attempt on Sony's Part to knock over MSwindows users.

When I saw title of thread I thought it was about that.

Yesterday in my class my professor went on for half the period of why Sony is evil for the whole rootkit thing. Even mentioned Slashdot. Best class day ever.

And yet another day when I was glad to say "whew, glad I use Linux." XP must be the only platform in software history where the quality is being LOWERED by current trends of its third party developers. Most improve with third developer support, even at the end of the lifespan.