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View Full Version : How far have you upgraded..not clean installed?



djsroknrol
July 16th, 2008, 08:55 PM
I've upgraded each new release from Dapper to Heron without a clean install. There were the usual programs that needed re-installs (i.e. VMware, Uplink and a few others), but I haven't seen any ill effects in going this route.

I'm wondering if anyone else has gone this route and if there were any bumps or glitches experienced. Are there any pros or cons in doing straight upgrades that I might not have noticed along the way?

LittleLORDevil
July 16th, 2008, 09:24 PM
I always do a clean install for some reason.

panickedthumb
July 16th, 2008, 09:27 PM
I'm proud to say that I've been upgrading since the alpha stages of the very first release. I have had issues, but that one installation has carried me since 2004, currently on Hardy. It's also gone between 3 different computers, but I always did that with an upgrade so it picked things up well. My /home partition has been wiped about 25 times since then though.

beercz
July 16th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Warty->Hardy

TBOL3
July 16th, 2008, 10:07 PM
Well, I had gone from dapper to fiesty. But I then got new computers, and did a fresh install on them. So I can say

Dapper -> Fiesty
Gutsy -> Hardy

Koori23
July 16th, 2008, 10:31 PM
I've gone from Breezy to Gutsy, upgrading each release. However, since Gutsy I've become more brazen in my editing of files and end up needing to clean install.

amazingtaters
July 16th, 2008, 10:39 PM
I'm seriously impressed by these long runs without clean installs. I just like to start with a fresh slate every 6 months though. It lets me go through and clean off all of the crap I don't actually use/want anymore, which I wouldn't do as often otherwise because I'm a packrat.

djsroknrol
July 16th, 2008, 11:44 PM
I'm seriously impressed by these long runs without clean installs. I just like to start with a fresh slate every 6 months though. It lets me go through and clean off all of the crap I don't actually use/want anymore, which I wouldn't do as often otherwise because I'm a packrat.

This is why Ubuntu is my main OS. I look at it this way...When I was using MS products, I had to re-install every 6-8 months to ward off or correct breakage...Ubuntu has always been rock solid for me.

dizee
July 17th, 2008, 12:16 AM
i dist-upgraded edgy to feisty. gutsy was a clean install cos i switched to xubuntu. did a clean install of hardy again because i was changing the size of partitions.

hellion0
July 17th, 2008, 12:46 AM
I dist-upgraded on my Thinkpad from Feisty to Hardy.

BenM
July 17th, 2008, 03:20 AM
I have a defective CD/DVD drive that will, for some reason I will never understand, only reads a single Breezy ship-it that I have. So while I have wanted to do clean installs, nothing else works regardless of release or whether it was ship-it or I had burned the disk. So I went from Breezy to Gutsy using upgrades.

I hosed my partition a couple of times trying a clean install because of drive errors and wound up installing from that Breezy CD and doing consecutive upgrades. For Hardy, I was so glad to be able to use unetbootin!

(I still keep that Breezy CD around just in case!)

-grubby
July 17th, 2008, 03:35 AM
I'm proud to say that I've been upgrading since the alpha stages of the very first release. I have had issues, but that one installation has carried me since 2004, currently on Hardy. It's also gone between 3 different computers, but I always did that with an upgrade so it picked things up well. My /home partition has been wiped about 25 times since then though.

A bit offtopic but panickedthumb! I haven't even seen you post before, I thought you left. Welcome back

Can+~
July 17th, 2008, 04:25 AM
Ubuntu Feisty -> Ubuntu Gutsy : Some issues, I formatted anyway.
Ubuntu Gutsy -> Ubuntu Hardy : More issues, I formatted anyway.

I guess... no, I never get past one upgrade. I like the feel of a recently installed OS. The issues were no big, but I don't rest easy knowing there's something wrong.

NovaAesa
July 17th, 2008, 04:49 AM
I've never upgraded. It's always been a clean install for me.

bilijoe
July 17th, 2008, 06:06 AM
I'm very impressed by hearing of folks who have successfully gone the all upgrade route, and still have a trouble free system. It says a lot to me about the good folks who program and maintain my favorite (and I think, the very best) flavor of Linux. However, I always do clean installs, and here's why.

Some time ago, after an update (not a version upgrade, just a run-of-the-mill update), my system began to act strangely. It got progressively slower, and began exhibiting other anomalous behavior (much like a Windows install, God forbid). After deciding I must have a corrupted system file somewhere, I reasoned that the most likely cause was an undetected transmission error that occurred while the update was downloading. By the time I got around to doing a re-install, to clean things up, I had suffered many headaches, and lost several files.

Though I still do routine updates, when it comes to version upgrades, because of the large amount of data involved, I prefer to download the .iso file, make an install CD, and install from the CD. The reason is simple. I can check the .iso file for errors by doing an MD5 checksum compare, and I can check the CD for errors via the routine given in the documentation on downloading Ubuntu. This gives me a nice secure feeling, knowing that the bits and bytes that make up the system I am installing have gotten at least as far as the CD, without any errors.

To reinforce my feeling that the extra work of checking both the .iso file, and the CD is worth it, in some 20 or 25 downloads (mostly for friends, on their computers), I have encountered 2 situations where the MD5 checksum values did not match, and I had to re-download the file, and one situation where the CD check turned up an error. Imagine what kind of insidious bug might have resulted, had I blindly gone ahead, and used those downloads and CD, without doing the integrity tests.

Even more important (in my mind) is the fact that, in all three cases, the install was being done for a friend who I was converting from Windows to Linux, so any bugs that would have resulted from these corrupted files or CD, would have been seen by the potential convertee as evidence that all s/he had heard about Linux being immature, problematic, bug-prone, and only for geeks who like the challenge of having to dive into the guts of their systems were, in fact, true, and they almost surely would have gone back to Windows. And wouldn't that have been a shame?

So, whenever I install a new system, be it a fresh install on a non-Linux computer, or a version upgrade on mine, or a friend's computer, I always like to take that extra step, to add a bit of insurance, that the install will be flawless. So far, every install I have done in this way has been solid as the rock of Gibraltar, and the owner of the machine has been duly impressed, become a die-hard convert, and laughed, along with me, at all the people who still can't get it through their heads that there now really is a viable alternative to that bloated, under-tested, under-documented, time-bombed mess that is Windows.

kostkon
July 17th, 2008, 06:30 AM
Feisty -> Gutsy, no problems at all
Gutsy -> Hardy, no problems, again :)

I prefer to upgrade so I won't have to setup the system again. It took me so much time to make my system as I want it. Why to destroy everything and start again from zero?!

I don't even have a separate partition for /home

apadula
July 17th, 2008, 07:25 AM
I started with Dapper and upgraded all the way through to Hardy, including a few beta releases along the way.

All was very well until Hardy started slowing down, and strange things like clicking on the clock in the Gnome panel would hang X.

So I decided to shop around for another distro, actually installed Fedora 9 and Mint 5, but came back to a fresh install of Hardy. My /home is NFS mounted, and user authentication is from LDAP, and neither of the other two distros worked very well with that. I probably could have fixed them with a bit of effort, but I'm far too lazy for that.

I'm not sure whether I'll upgrade or fresh install next time around or not.

Cheers,
Anthony

Corvo78
July 17th, 2008, 09:48 AM
6.10 Edgy Eft ---> 7.04 Feisty Fawn by Upgrade
7.04 Feisty Fawn ---> 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon by Clean install (keeping my /home untouched)
7.10 Gutsy Gibbon ---> 8.04 Hardy Heron by Upgrade

...
and I intend to do
8.04 Hard Heron ---> 8.10 Intrepid Ibex by Clean install

:KS
Basically I've gone the "1 upgrade and 1 clean install per year"-route. :)