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View Full Version : Cracking open the CPU chip



Jareth
July 15th, 2008, 11:32 AM
Ok, I don't imagine I'm the only one on here who's ever wanted to do this. I just wanted to make sure there wasn't anything harmfull going to pop out at me and blind me or give me cancer (what doesn't these days).

I'll explain. I have a really old computer thats not being used and I couldn't even give it away. So now that I'm getting pestered to dump it to make space I'm going to dissect it, for my own amusement.

I wanna see the insides of everything so now that I've removed the heatsink and the fan and have got the chip out, I want to see its guts. Delicate is not my thing so should I just take a chisel to it and cleave it in twain? Or, is there a nifty easier way to get at the good stuff?

Ta, maybe I'll take pics if anyone else is interested.

btw, I don't do kids parties!:lolflag:

barbedsaber
July 15th, 2008, 11:53 AM
pics make sure you take pics, and videos.
WHAT, YOU MONSTER, COMPUTERS FEEL PAIN TOO!!!!!111oneone

fiddledd
July 15th, 2008, 11:55 AM
If you use a really powerful microscope, in the middle you'll see a little wheel (like what a hamster has in a cage). On that wheel is a really, really, really small hamster. When current is applied to the hamster it tries to run away, but it has nowhere to go, so the wheel spins, providing power for the nano computer inside the chip.

Please post a picture of the hamster as not many people have actually seen one. I mean, we all know they are there, but not many people actual break open a CPU.

Canis familiaris
July 15th, 2008, 12:33 PM
If you use a really powerful microscope, in the middle you'll see a little wheel (like what a hamster has in a cage). On that wheel is a really, really, really small hamster. When current is applied to the hamster it tries to run away, but it has nowhere to go, so the wheel spins, providing power for the nano computer inside the chip.

Please post a picture of the hamster as not many people have actually seen one. I mean, we all know they are there, but not many people actual break open a CPU.

:lolflag:

@OP: Do not forget that the Chip contains hazardous materials like Arsenic, Lead, etc. So I suggest DONT.
You wont learn anything either.

loell
July 15th, 2008, 12:41 PM
You wont learn anything either.

the OP don't do kid parties, so maybe he's genius enough to learn something by opening that delicate thing. :razz:

NovaAesa
July 15th, 2008, 02:10 PM
Don't worry about the lead and arsnic (I wouldn't). They are probably in really small quantitis anyway. Or just wear gloves if you are paranoid. And yes, take pics!

Jareth
July 15th, 2008, 02:24 PM
Lordy!

I tried pics on my camera, which decided not to work.
So I took some on my phone, which is refusing to bluetooth to my computer!

Its the little hamster that got free, I'm sure of it. There are pics, not very good ones, and they are on there way. Eventually.

fiddledd
July 15th, 2008, 02:41 PM
Lordy!

I tried pics on my camera, which decided not to work.
So I took some on my phone, which is refusing to bluetooth to my computer!

Its the little hamster that got free, I'm sure of it. There are pics, not very good ones, and they are on there way. Eventually.

You may have a problem. The scientists that created the nano hamster had a problem. They was able to hide the food inside the CPU, but, what goes in must come out. Obviously they couldn't have the hamster defecating inside the chip, so they engineered the hamster to only poop when there was light. Well, as you can imagine, it's pretty dark inside a CPU, so this worked fine. Unfortunately you've let it out into the light. Now I don't know how old the CPU is, but I'm guessing there's a lot of mess going to be made somewhere. So you better find it quick.

( /me wonders what I've been smoking lately :) )

Tristam Green
July 15th, 2008, 02:59 PM
There is no hamster+wheel - everyone who has ever worked on a computer knows that CPUs are powered by magic blue smoke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_smoke).

fiddledd
July 15th, 2008, 03:03 PM
There is no hamster+wheel - everyone who has ever worked on a computer knows that CPUs are powered by magic blue smoke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_smoke).

Yes, but not everyone knows that Magic Blue Smoke comes out of the hamster's rear end.

lazertek
July 15th, 2008, 04:13 PM
Interesting! I wouldn't mind doing that on my IBM P2 laptop sitting around doing nothing.... Doesn't work BTW... Motherboard is corrupt so its almost trash anyways! I would look up some instructions and videos before I do it myself....

damis648
July 15th, 2008, 04:17 PM
Yes, but not everyone knows that Magic Blue Smoke comes out of the hamster's rear end.

:lolflag:

@OP: Don't forget about the pics!

Sporkman
July 15th, 2008, 08:54 PM
If you use a really powerful microscope, in the middle you'll see a little wheel (like what a hamster has in a cage). On that wheel is a really, really, really small hamster. When current is applied to the hamster it tries to run away, but it has nowhere to go, so the wheel spins, providing power for the nano computer inside the chip.


No, that just powers the fan. Most of that energy actually goes to generating the stimulating current. Not very efficient, but advantageous in that in the case of a power supply fault, the fan continues to run independently, thereby avoiding any costly heat overloads.

aaaantoine
July 15th, 2008, 09:15 PM
If the chip is from this millenium, it should have a metal heat spreader on it. Remove this carefully, and you will see what the chip really looks like. Modern CPUs are really, really, really small.

If, however, you see what looks like a big piece of silicon instead of metal, that's probably the whole CPU right there. I haven't seen that since Pentium 1, though.

Canis familiaris
July 15th, 2008, 09:30 PM
If the chip is from this millenium, it should have a metal heat spreader on it. Remove this carefully, and you will see what the chip really looks like. Modern CPUs are really, really, really small.

If, however, you see what looks like a big piece of silicon instead of metal, that's probably the whole CPU right there. I haven't seen that since Pentium 1, though.

You are talking about seeing the chip. Apparently thats not enough for the OP. He wants to crack open the CPU chip and see what is inside the chip.

Sporkman
July 15th, 2008, 09:47 PM
You are talking about seeing the chip. Apparently thats not enough for the OP. He wants to crack open the CPU chip and see what is inside the chip.

The shiny metal/silicon piece is the "chip". The black plastic thing that contains the chip, and has pins or other connections sticking out of it, is the "package".

Jareth
July 16th, 2008, 02:21 PM
Waaaaay!, Finally got the photo's sorted.

Like I say not much to look at really and can't say there's much educational content to em but they give an idea on how I got it to pieces.
BTW I broke the chip at the end otherwise it would have remained intact, no probs.

The grey bit of it felt like slate so I'm not sure what compound that is, answers are welcome. Couldn't be bothered looking it up.:confused:

Inside the chip at the centre of it was all shiny and went to pieces easily under a hammer. Getting the plate off to start with was tricky, it took a few screw drivers to peel it off the glue.

Enjoy! I did!

Jareth
July 16th, 2008, 02:25 PM
A few more pics.

The broken bits

Canis familiaris
July 16th, 2008, 02:25 PM
That 5th photo in the first list looks very similar to what Intel Pentium III and older AMD Athlon looked like.

fiddledd
July 16th, 2008, 02:30 PM
Now destroy your Plasma TV, Freezer, DVD Player, Main Computer. And don't forget the pics. :)

Moustacha
July 16th, 2008, 04:22 PM
That 5th photo in the first list looks very similar to what Intel Pentium III and older AMD Athlon looked like.

Like that...obviously not as a slot since that's a slot A athlon, not a socket A
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Slot-A_Athlon.jpg

Whole heap of them on the Athlon page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_Athlon

dicecca112
July 16th, 2008, 04:44 PM
Ok, I don't imagine I'm the only one on here who's ever wanted to do this. I just wanted to make sure there wasn't anything harmfull going to pop out at me and blind me or give me cancer (what doesn't these days).

I'll explain. I have a really old computer thats not being used and I couldn't even give it away. So now that I'm getting pestered to dump it to make space I'm going to dissect it, for my own amusement.

I wanna see the insides of everything so now that I've removed the heatsink and the fan and have got the chip out, I want to see its guts. Delicate is not my thing so should I just take a chisel to it and cleave it in twain? Or, is there a nifty easier way to get at the good stuff?

Ta, maybe I'll take pics if anyone else is interested.

btw, I don't do kids parties!:lolflag:
There's nothing to see, you need a microscope to see anything, and that's in the die, the big metal part. Just google CPU Die Pics, and there you go

Canis familiaris
July 17th, 2008, 12:55 PM
Like that...obviously not as a slot since that's a slot A athlon, not a socket A
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Slot-A_Athlon.jpg

Whole heap of them on the Athlon page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_Athlon

No it seems similar to Athlon Thunderbird and the like.

steveneddy
July 17th, 2008, 01:59 PM
The easiest ways we have found to see the inside of a processor chip was to leave the heat sink off and turn the machine on. In about three seconds the top of the chip will pop off for you.

Please stand back as the top of the chip will go flying, possibly embedding itself in some exposed part of the observer's body.

djkmmo
July 17th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Like that...obviously not as a slot since that's a slot A athlon, not a socket A
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Slot-A_Athlon.jpg

Whole heap of them on the Athlon page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_Athlon

You couldn't be bothered to look ~2 cm further down the wiki site, now could you? Pic of Socket A AMD Athlon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Tbird850.jpg)

Tristam Green
July 17th, 2008, 03:01 PM
I love topics like these. People learning new things, exploring and just having fun? It's awesome :D

Moustacha
July 18th, 2008, 10:05 AM
You couldn't be bothered to look ~2 cm further down the wiki site, now could you? Pic of Socket A AMD Athlon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Tbird850.jpg)

You couldn't be bothered not being an ****?

I said there's a heap more pictures on the page, and that was the first picture showing the processor without the heatsink. That square thing in the middle? That's the processor, it doesn't have to NOT be a slot to not be an example.