PDA

View Full Version : The other desktop OS!



icett
July 11th, 2008, 08:38 PM
We are all Linux fans but just for a few moments let us all become neutral and think neutral. Now as we all know despite Windows Vista's flaws, Windows is still a dominant desktop operating system running over 90% of desktops worldwide. Now I just wish your view about which other desktop operating system has the potential to become another widely used desktop operating system in the world? My view is if Apple releases its upcoming OS X Snow Leopard OS for PCs also it has the potential and there are quite a few strong hints or call them rumors that Apple may release its new OS for PCs worldwide. What do you think? Do you agree with this or think something else? Do you think some other OS would become the other most widely used desktop os in the world beside Windows? If so which one? Post your views and take part in the poll.:guitar:

TwiceOver
July 11th, 2008, 08:45 PM
I'm all for Apple releasing OSX (or whatever) to be used on PCs. I brought this up one time and people were saying that it would be too hard for Apple to support all the hardware configurations of the PC world. I just don't buy that. If apple wanted to they could contract another company (dell, HP...) to build only to their specification.

I think the problem Apple has with doing this is that all their fans will realize that they have been paying several hundreds of dollars for an operating system due to hardware markup. Last time I checked an intel dual core 2gb 500gb yada yada yada machine doesn't cost $2000 to build even when you slap a stand and a 20" monitor on it.

JMO. One side of my family are PC and the other side are Mac. It makes for funny get togethers.

Canis familiaris
July 11th, 2008, 08:49 PM
Ubuntu is the biggest challenger to Windows IMO.
Apple in PC? No thank you very much.

cardinals_fan
July 11th, 2008, 08:54 PM
OpenSolaris is going places. Where, I'm not sure, but it is definitely a player.

LaRoza
July 11th, 2008, 08:56 PM
OpenSolaris is going places. Where, I'm not sure, but it is definitely a player.

Yes, it is quite nice for a new OS. I tried it as a live disk and was able to use it effectively for my normal activities (Flash worked fine and so did the hardware and effects)

cardinals_fan
July 11th, 2008, 09:01 PM
Yes, it is quite nice for a new OS. I tried it as a live disk and was able to use it effectively for my normal activities (Flash worked fine and so did the hardware and effects)
It's a bit slow for me, but it's still a lot of fun to mess around with. Sun may have finally done something right.

Woormy
July 11th, 2008, 09:15 PM
I really think any of these could succeed with the right business model.

gunashekar
July 11th, 2008, 09:19 PM
I really think any of these could succeed with the right business model.

Do you have a business model in mind? or would that be off-topic

LaRoza
July 11th, 2008, 09:23 PM
Do you have a business model in mind? or would that be off-topic

I think it just meant they all had the technical ability to be widely used.

matt79
July 11th, 2008, 09:34 PM
Well I think that which ever is more stable and wizard friendly will be the next one to windows. One reason that windows is so wide spread is it provides a standard for businesses. Plus there are lots of wizards so people do not have to do the work. While I like linux, I am constantly checking to see how stuff works on windows and other OS, to make sure that if I offer stuff to other people they can use it. In the business world windows does that for you. If it works on XP than it works on any XP computer. What microsoft has going for them is 90% percent of the computers have windows. A business that wants to make it is not going to just dump the windows standard and go to linux. Even if windows cost $$$. The only way there is going to be a big "over throw" is if microsoft has a big mess up. Of course that is just my opinion.:lolflag:

Vitamin-Carrot
July 11th, 2008, 10:03 PM
OpenSolaris is going places. Where, I'm not sure, but it is definitely a player.

Had a chance to play with it a bit at work ... and yes i think its very nice for a sun OS

RiceMonster
July 11th, 2008, 10:11 PM
I can see OSX becoming pretty popular (I know a few people who have switched to it), and while I'm particularly fond of it myself, It's a very good OS, and it's really easy to learn. I actually think the idea of locking it in tightly was a good choice. Most people won't agree, but it makes the OS a lot more stable, and you get the best performance out of the hardware (not that it's completely problem free or anything).

MaxIBoy
July 11th, 2008, 10:19 PM
Until Apple stops playing with its Junior Microsoft Kit, it's not going to becomes successful. By restricting the hardware its customers can use (something not even M$ does,) it's limiting its customers to those who are willing to buy its ridiculously overpriced computers. Their hardware has improved since they went Intel, but now they're just another vendor of x86 PCs. In many ways they're worse than Microsoft.


In other words, you can choose the rock (windows,) the hard place (OS X,) or the all-you-can-eat free buffet (Linux.) The choice becomes obvious. The only Linux-on-Linux competition I foresee is APT vs. RPM. I think APT is likely to win. After that, I don't think any one distro will come out on top. I see this as a good thing.

BSD is also a very nice alternative, but I don't see it becoming anywhere near as successful.

Haiku also has the potential to become more common by merit alone, it just needs some work. I know for sure that if I ever made a distro, it would be a Haiku distro.

jespdj
July 11th, 2008, 10:22 PM
... if Apple releases its upcoming OS X Snow Leopard OS for PCs ...
That is not going to happen anytime soon. Apple doesn't like people running OS X on a non-Apple computer.

Ubuntu and openSUSE have better chances than OS X to become bigger on the PC.

I have a DVD with OpenSolaris and installed it in a VM. I don't see anything that's compelling me to use it instead of Ubuntu. If it doesn't have any special advantages, I don't see it getting anywhere soon.

macogw
July 12th, 2008, 05:45 AM
There's enough impressive about Compiz and enough of a price disadvantage to OSX that I think Linux, if preinstalled on widely available (in stores!) computers, could easily overtake it.

Ioky
July 12th, 2008, 06:35 AM
For me, If I can get the hardware supported with Solaris I will use Solaris. Not just it because it is stable, yes, I do have a IBM computer using Solaris once. And it runs Linux Software perfectly.

grossaffe
July 12th, 2008, 07:06 AM
apple is too expensive and controlling to really take over, that's where linux has the advantage.

Ocxic
July 12th, 2008, 07:08 AM
apple releasing OS X for all PC would be a good thing, but in all actuality most people would find it very limiting. you can't even theme it, there is absolutely no choice involved in this operating system. yes it is stable on Apple hardware, but I'm sure it;s gonna have even more problems once it releases worldwide for all PC's. basic idea with OS X is that you get what you buy NO MORE no less. if you don't like the way it looks too bad theres no way to change it. Windows has about 10 times more freedom with there OS then Apple's OS X has. at least you can change the way windows looks. I don't see OS X doing much better then Linux on the open market, and could see Linux doing even better

frup
July 12th, 2008, 07:18 AM
Mac OSX is already having increased adoption, joe six packs go crazy for ipods and gaga for iphones :S

Ubuntu, Xandros (via eeePC), SuSe etc. etc. all doing really well at the moment.

They are all getting increased adoption at fairly good rates, provided more linux-based pc's were actually sold and marketed I think they could easily be as popular as macs, the tech is there it's just the appeal to people who don't actually care that is missing... It doesn't matter because they don't care.

Haiku has a long way to go, and until they update their compiler, they are living in the past, which is why they can't update their compiler too ^_^
I think reactos has more potential than Haiku in the market share category, but for me the only use would be as a virtual machine, provide wine doesn't null anything I want to do already (which currently is nothing anyway)

Solaris/BSD ... I suppose it's good for enterprise and servers... but what use does it have at home, ZFS is all I see coming from those camps, I'm sure apple would snap up anything there with OSX though.

Ubuntu seems to be the only distribution/Operating system that I am currently happy with though... I'd be fairly liquid with distribution but no other operating system has the appeal to me that linux-based ones do... gnome-based in particular... It's the whole package I like, FOSS, Gnome, Applications and all the benefits Linux and Ubuntu provide. More people in my family use Ubuntu than windows, my girlfriend uses it and came to me the other day and asked if I could put Ubuntu on her recently deceased fathers laptop so that her mum would find it easier to use (Their main desktop is a mac, which they are happy with - I still seem to be configuring mailboxes/trouble shooting occasionally unfortunately... Her Ubuntu machine, an old p3 doesn't gain nearly as much of my attention, only needing one update since 6.10 to 7.10 just to make the ipod I got her for christmas work... she prefers rhythmbox to itunes to manage her ipod and they all find much of the macs working illogical compared to the standard gnome interface)

MaxIBoy
July 12th, 2008, 07:23 AM
Like I said, Haiku needs work. However, in terms of performance, it looks really promising.

sharks
July 12th, 2008, 07:28 AM
Ubuntu

karellen
July 12th, 2008, 08:22 AM
Apple Mac OS X. it has 8% market share already, and it's gaining fast (faster than Linux anyway)

jespdj
July 12th, 2008, 08:31 AM
Apple Mac OS X. it has 8% market share already, and it's gaining fast (faster than Linux anyway)
But the question was which OS was going to be big on the PC (a regular PC, not an Apple computer), and there Mac OS X has 0% market share, and Apple is not going to allow people installing OS X on non-Apple computers anytime soon.

samjh
July 12th, 2008, 08:52 AM
I would have chosen MacOS, but I don't think it really qualifies as an alternative operating system, since it is pretty much mainstream alongside Windows.

Between BSD and Solaris, I'd go for Solaris. I used to play around with the Solaris terminals back in my university days, and it was a good OS.

L815
July 12th, 2008, 08:58 AM
To be honest, I don't think Apple will make it that far as a Desktop OS.
It's way to proprietary, and seeing how tech savvy the future populous will be, I think they would be smart enough to build their on PC's, or prefer a PC with more options later on.

I think Linux will eventually beat Apple, is because:
1: It's free
2: Great live community
3: Wine
4: It runs on almost anything out of the box (I said almost :P)


Windows I think will still be a big competitor, but seeing how many of the Apps I used for Windows are Free/Open Source, I don't have much trouble going to Linux. Especially when more big software packages port over.
Despite the free OS, I don't think people would be less willing to pay for Photoshop etc... if they really want it to begin with.

As for the top contenders for Linux, I would have to say :

Ubuntu / Ubuntu derivatives - Easy, fast, and best support (community) IMO
OpenSuse - Fairly Solid, seems more up to date than Ubuntu on some things.

UniverseA7X
July 12th, 2008, 09:16 AM
But the question was which OS was going to be big on the PC (a regular PC, not an Apple computer), and there Mac OS X has 0% market share, and Apple is not going to allow people installing OS X on non-Apple computers anytime soon.

True.

I think the vendor lock in though is a sort of quality control. You don't have companies pointing the finger if the hardware or software fails or has bugs. No matter what, you know Apple will be responsible. Though price is arguable, I'd rather not have to make twenty phone calls to different companies for support. And in all cases I've needed help, Apple has been very punctual and helpful with support. I even screwed my old iPod Mini over by unplugging it while it was still mounted, and I clearly said that in an email to support. They sent me an empty box to send the iPod back, and within a week, I had a brand new one.

And with how visually appealing and how popular the Apple stores are now, I see Mac OS X really taking up a large part of the market share.

Linux however, could be a viable alternative to either Windows or OS X if it gets enough exposure in stores. We need OEMs to preload Linux on machines. I think Distros like Ubuntu and openSUSE are pretty and stable enough for the public, and if they had driver support from the vendors, the systems would be rock solid.

karellen
July 12th, 2008, 09:32 AM
But the question was which OS was going to be big on the PC (a regular PC, not an Apple computer), and there Mac OS X has 0% market share, and Apple is not going to allow people installing OS X on non-Apple computers anytime soon.

making Mac OS X available for all PCs (not just the ones with Apple logo on them) would be a great marketing movement from Apple

joninkrakow
July 12th, 2008, 10:17 AM
I think the problem Apple has with doing this is that all their fans will realize that they have been paying several hundreds of dollars for an operating system due to hardware markup. Last time I checked an intel dual core 2gb 500gb yada yada yada machine doesn't cost $2000 to build even when you slap a stand and a 20" monitor on it.


http://www.macobserver.com/article/2008/07/09.7.shtml

For what it's worth, I've been using my 2000 laptop now for 8 years as my main computer. It's running Tiger. Granted, I did upgrade the processor to a G4, but the hardware is ironclad. Total cost of ownership is all-too-frequently much lower than with generic boxes, or even name-brand boxes running Windows. (I wouldn't know about Linux, because that hasn't been discussed much). When you move up to a comparable level of hardware in the DOS-box market, you pay similar, and often more. My friend bought a top-o-the-line Toshiba, and paid several hundred more than he later paid for his MacBook Pro when it turned out his Windows box stunk. Needless to say, he learned a lesson. Sometimes Mac hardware is worth it. :-)

BTW, the cost of software in a comparison between Windows and Macs is valid for the average buyer. Personally, I would never pay for the Apple hardware just to run Linux on it, but to run both LInux and MacOS--definitely. Right now, while my Pismo has Linux on it, I much prefer running Ubuntu on my Dell beater-book. ;-)

-Jon