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adamant715
July 8th, 2008, 07:03 PM
This OS is starting to really **** me of..lol Anyway when I tried to move a file into a folder it said this.

There was an error moving the file into /usr/share/gimp/2.0/brushes.
Error moving file: Permission denied

llama320
July 8th, 2008, 07:06 PM
you need root privileges to copy the file. You can do this by using the cp (copy) command from terminal (Applications > Terminal)


sudo cp file_you_want_to_move target_location

then just type in your password

Good Luck

Dr Small
July 8th, 2008, 07:07 PM
Use sudo:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

phidia
July 8th, 2008, 07:07 PM
If you are sure you want to move that file there use sudo in front of the mv command.
Linux prevents you from messing up system files by only allowing the admin account to make system level changes.

kestrel1
July 8th, 2008, 07:07 PM
Go to the terminal & use:

sudo CP 'source file' /usr/share/gimp/2.0/brushes

snowpine
July 8th, 2008, 07:14 PM
It's a feature, not a bug. :)

Frak
July 8th, 2008, 07:17 PM
As said, its there to protect your computer from unauthenticated use. Yes, you are by default not able to use some things on there. It's a way to protect you from yourself.

use sudo to do most things, but if you use a graphical app, use gksudo instead. (kdesu on KDE systems).

kostkon
July 8th, 2008, 07:23 PM
This OS is starting to really **** me of..lol Anyway when I tried to move a file into a folder it said this.

There was an error moving the file into /usr/share/gimp/2.0/brushes.
Error moving file: Permission denied
Why not just copy them to your own user folder for Gimp that exists in your home, i.e.:

~/.gimp-2.0/brushes

Paqman
July 8th, 2008, 07:24 PM
use sudo to do most things, but if you use a graphical app, use gksudo instead. (kdesu on KDE systems).

In other words, if you want to use the normal file manager, launch it (Alt-F2) using the command:



gksudo nautilus

Then copy away to your heart's content. Close the file manager as soon as you're done with the task that needs root privileges.

File permissions are a pain at first, but they're one of the reasons Linux is so secure. It's worth learning about how to use them properly.

roderick
July 8th, 2008, 08:27 PM
THe location you are using is a system directory, and not the correct place to put this, unless you have a multiuser setup and truly want it available to all users. If it's just one user, then put it in your local directory as previously mentioned.

Hint, if the directory isn't /home/USERNAME, then you need root (i.e. sudo) priviledges to write to it - this is for your own protection and the sanity of the system.