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humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:26 PM
hello. ive been wondering for alittle while now about what it related work gives the most money.

i wanted to become a programmer and when i heard they make alot of money i thought about what else in this business gives a nice salary. also the work need to be fun.

and oh. can you make money on being an expert in linux.

hmmm

does it pay to be an expert in windows too. or at a deeper level is it the same thing?

Dixon Bainbridge
July 1st, 2008, 09:30 PM
Hard coding chips pays alot, but thats because no one wants to do it :p

TwiceOver
July 1st, 2008, 09:33 PM
It also really depends where you are. I make a very good wage for where I live, now take that wage to a huge city and I probably couldn't afford to rent a closet.

humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:34 PM
Hard coding chips pays alot, but thats because no one wants to do it :p

sounds fun. how come noone wants to do it?

i think i would want to program robots and ai and that sort of thing. is that good pay?

my modest little beginning to this world is that ive ordered a book about programming. also i thinking aboutt aking some kind of education. thats why i ask. I dont know the english word for the course thpough hmmmm, its about computer systems and its three years. does sysadmins still make money?

Dixon Bainbridge
July 1st, 2008, 09:41 PM
sounds fun. how come noone wants to do it?


Think of the most tedious thing to do in the world, like watching Heroes or something. Then multiply it by about a zillion. You're still no where near how tedious hard coding chips is. My friend did it for six months. He earnt more than he had previously in five years, but girls stopped finding him attractive cos he smelt of pizza and coke. He saw daylight once I think.

humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:42 PM
i guess i should update and say bestt paid all over the world. the guy that inspired me to take this course said he can work anywhere in the world and get alot of money. the diffrence is that he didnt think its fun while i think i would enjoy such a job.

anymore jobs like that. programmer? what more? whats the future?

humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:45 PM
Think of the most tedious thing to do in the world, like watching Heroes or something. Then multiply it by about a zillion. You're still no where near how tedious hard coding chips is. My friend did it for six months. He earnt more than he had previously in five years, but girls stopped finding him attractive cos he smelt of pizza and coke. He saw daylight once I think.

:D that sounds great. what education do i need? does it have some kind of different name or is it just hard coding chips?

Dixon Bainbridge
July 1st, 2008, 09:50 PM
Depends on which area you go into. He was programming military grade night vision camera equipment so I guess that paid alot. He had first degree in cybernetics though, so that probably helped. Good luck.

Joshuwa
July 1st, 2008, 09:54 PM
Just be advised: a degree in Computer Science/Engineering will have you literally neck-deep in mathematics.

By my junior year, I had (by requirement) taken more math courses than some of my friends who were majoring in math. Because the curriculum was more about mathematic theory in computing, rather than practical application, I opted out.

Now I'm headed towards my last semester majoring in Geographic Information Science, and it's been an absolute dream. Now knowledge in programming and algorithms, databases, server management, etc is being put to use, and I'm doing more coding than ever.

humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:56 PM
where do I learn this stuff. I mean whos doing who and why and what they make in salary? whats new and old and stuff

Joshuwa
July 1st, 2008, 09:58 PM
where do I learn this stuff. I mean whos doing who and why and what they make in salary? whats new and old and stuff

Just go to any job search site (Monster.com, for example) and look at IT jobs that might interest you. Look at what the pay/benefits are, what the job does, and what requirements it has.

Theres literally thousands of things you could do, and it's impossible to give you a generalization of what to expect.

humansreplaceable
July 1st, 2008, 09:59 PM
Just be advised: a degree in Computer Science/Engineering will have you literally neck-deep in mathematics.

By my junior year, I had (by requirement) taken more math courses than some of my friends who were majoring in math. Because the curriculum was more about mathematic theory in computing, rather than practical application, I opted out.

Now I'm headed towards my last semester majoring in Geographic Information Science, and it's been an absolute dream. Now knowledge in programming and algorithms, databases, server management, etc is being put to use, and I'm doing more coding than ever.


should I learn math before doing this course of three years we learn about systems and how they work. can someone please tell me whats it called in english?

or do I learn math on the way while doing this?

is there any forum like this about ubuntu but about programming or other general computer stuff?

MrMatt2532
July 1st, 2008, 10:06 PM
should I learn math before doing this course of three years we learn about systems and how they work. can someone please tell me whats it called in english?

or do I learn math on the way while doing this?

is there any forum like this about ubuntu but about programming or other general computer stuff?

Go to a 4-year college (some may disagree), and get a degree in either Computer Science (CS) or Computer Engineering (CompE).

It can be helpful to do a little extra math in HS, but you'd probably only get rid of 1 or 2 math courses maximum. Either way, these curriculums are designed for people with no extra math skills than somebody knowing basic HS math.

Silpheed2K
July 1st, 2008, 10:14 PM
Some guys I knew who worked at Intel, told me that software programming is the way to go..
and yes... the math part is hard as heck for a CS degree.. that's one of the more troublesome spots for me.

Lostincyberspace
July 1st, 2008, 10:42 PM
It really depends on were you go I have inside knowledge about this area and there really are a lot of schools of technology that don't overemphasize math in CS degrees.

mkendall
July 2nd, 2008, 05:08 AM
Some guys I knew who worked at Intel, told me that software programming is the way to go..
and yes... the math part is hard as heck for a CS degree.. that's one of the more troublesome spots for me.

Are you serious? Calculus I/II and Discrete Mathematics was all that was required for a CS degree where I went. (Possibly more, depending on the concentration.) That's just a Sophomore level requirement. Hardly what I'd call "hard as heck."

Full disclosure: I only got a minor in Comp Sci; I had a double Mathematics/Physics major, deciding to add Physics my last year, and graduated with over 40 credit hours in Mathematics. There were asways more classes I wanted to take.