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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Is there an ubuntu program that has a feature similar to garageband's 'magic' feature



gottabeandrew
May 5th, 2008, 05:06 PM
I went on a mac today in a shop and went on garageband (which was already opened) and i seen that there was a feature called "magic create" or "magic garageband" or something like that and basically, what it done was it let you enter a type of music and then it would make you a song out of it. I'm sure you know about this already but i'm just making sure.

I was wondering if there was a program that does this for ubuntu?

Stochastic
May 5th, 2008, 09:10 PM
lol, yeah it's called limewire (or even gtk-gnutella), you search for the artist usually rather than the style though (but style searches work sometimes), and it gives you an mp3. Or do you need the parts separated?

gottabeandrew
May 5th, 2008, 11:13 PM
No, that's copyright. I mean it automatically generates music for you which is mainly music to be used as a backing track to something, which i would do in my youtube vlogs.

Stochastic
May 6th, 2008, 12:16 AM
Well I doubt that anything apple's programs create for you would be usable legally. I'd try browsing some netlabels as most of them use creative commons licenses. See http://www.archive.org/details/netlabels for a fairly extensive listing.

eric71
May 6th, 2008, 07:56 AM
Band In A Box works very well in wine. You just give it a chord progression and pick the style, instruments, etc. I just load up a good soundfont in Qsynth and make sure BIAB uses fluidsynth as its MIDI output. Then you can save your song as a midi file and open it in rosegarden. Or, if you use wineasio, you can route the audio from Qsynth to Ardour.

warbread
May 6th, 2008, 01:14 PM
I went on a mac today in a shop and went on garageband (which was already opened) and i seen that there was a feature called "magic create" or "magic garageband" or something like that and basically, what it done was it let you enter a type of music and then it would make you a song out of it. I'm sure you know about this already but i'm just making sure.

I was wondering if there was a program that does this for ubuntu?

The answer is a simple "no". What you'll find with music creation software in Linux vs. commercial programs is that there are some really powerful and capable open source tools, but the other guys get all the really cool toys.

If you want things like Garageband's fancy auto-creation features or solid plug in support, you'll have to pony up the bucks.

thorgal
May 7th, 2008, 08:51 AM
if one has an extra PC lying around or some free space on his current machine, one could :
- get the osx86 project and install macosx on this non mac PC
- get ilife 08 from some torrent
play with GB.

I will in no way tell you how to do all this though, if you wish to follow that road, you are completely on your own and I am not inciting you to do illegal stuff. All I can say is that if you're "lucky" with the hardware specs, it works.

see www.osx86project.org for learning

prismatic7
May 7th, 2008, 03:40 PM
Well I doubt that anything apple's programs create for you would be usable legally. I'd try browsing some netlabels as most of them use creative commons licenses. See http://www.archive.org/details/netlabels for a fairly extensive listing.

Actually, all of the Apple Loops available in Garageband (and Logic, for that matter) are royalty-free. You can use them however you wish.

Stochastic
May 7th, 2008, 09:17 PM
Actually, all of the Apple Loops available in Garageband (and Logic, for that matter) are royalty-free. You can use them however you wish.

Royalty-free and copyright free are two separate things. Royalty-free may be suitable for a vlog, but saying you can use them however you wish is incorrect, some royalty-free loops still require credits, just like any other legal sample. I don't really have time to check Apple's loop licenses so there may be allowances that effectively gives complete freedom, but I somehow still doubt it.

Stochastic
May 13th, 2008, 07:11 AM
I stumbled upon this: http://mellowood.ca/mma/
and this: http://pymprovisator.sourceforge.net/index_old.html
while browsing the linux-sound.org app listings, and thought of this thread. I still think netlabels are the best bet, as you can help advertise (in your credits) a hard working musician.

prismatic7
May 13th, 2008, 01:24 PM
Royalty-free and copyright free are two separate things. Royalty-free may be suitable for a vlog, but saying you can use them however you wish is incorrect, some royalty-free loops still require credits, just like any other legal sample. I don't really have time to check Apple's loop licenses so there may be allowances that effectively gives complete freedom, but I somehow still doubt it.

Seriously, I just did a subject on this at uni. The Apple Loops samples are for you to use in your own compositions, without attribution. You may derive income from compositions which include them. I know at least two designers here in Melbourne who are earning residuals from compositions using Apple Loops.

When you purchase Logic or whatever you gain a license to use them commercially. Believe me - I'm battling against Mac zealots every damn day and they keep bringing this up! Admittedly, you'll sound like every other soundie with a copy of the damn things (most of them are poisonously horrible!) but for stuff like throwing together a quick 1-minute loop for a single scene of theatre or film they could be useful.

That being said, I'm not sure you can make a composition using an Apple Loop and then release it under a CC Sampling license (for example) as you have to buy a copy of the software to use the loop in the first place. Thorny problem, made for lawyers to get fat on.

There are some samplesets that have specific licenses and naturally they can be very restrictive, but we can all make the decision to use them or not, as we see fit.

Anyway, this is a bit of a threadjack really. Happy to take it to PMs if you want to wrangle further!

Stochastic
May 13th, 2008, 08:41 PM
Oh I didn't want to wrangle, I was merely expressing my doubt. It's good to hear that the Apple loops are open actually. I'm always pleased to hear about things like this, just initially doubtful is all.

zettberlin
May 13th, 2008, 11:01 PM
but the other guys get all the really cool toys.

To be perfectly honest: I do NOT see ANYTHING "cool" about having a software "composing" "music" automatically.

The resulting muzak is completely useless sonic-pollution crab and every second wasted listening to such stuff is one second to much.

So please consider to fetch a software like LMMS, Qtractor or Rosegarden, create something on your own with kindly helpfull software and get backing-sounds, that are really your own - that in fact is cool.



If you want things like Garageband's fancy auto-creation features or solid plug in support, you'll have to pony up the bucks.

I dont have any trouble using plugins in Qtractor or Ardour and as I dont think auto-creation is something like fancy I dont have to touch any bucks to make music :guitar:

thorgal
May 13th, 2008, 11:07 PM
haha! very good points my friend :lol:
But everybody's free to do whatever, even crap music that did not come out of their brain :) all is relative in this world ... I chose the hard way for myself it seems but I wouldn't get any fun from such an automatic feature. Actually, it would make me puke, my music sense is very sensitive ... :)