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frup
April 28th, 2008, 01:28 PM
A friend gave me his broken laptop a while ago. After a bit of tinkering over the last few hours I have go it going. Its now running mandrake 10.1

Thatś the only distro I had available that will run on 128mb ram (half the problem was the ram had failed) The n key needs to be pressed a few times to get working and the laptop doesnīt seem to have wireless.

I going to have to call my friend and see if the laptop does infact have wireless and if it does I may fork out for some old ram. Itś a dell inspiron 8200 with 1.8ghz intel mobile processor. About 2003 - 2005 iīd say.

I think i going to hunt for some low spec distros for this laptop and try get the keyboard fixed (maybe it was me pulling the laptop to bits that broke the kb only the n key seems to be broken though n and it works if i type really hard nnnnn hhehe.

freduardo
April 28th, 2008, 01:35 PM
1.8 GHz is not at all 'old' imho, especially if you can find some more RAM.

But brushing up seemingly old/obsolete hardware to a completely functional system is quite fun.

Good luck and have fun ;)

eldragon
April 28th, 2008, 01:43 PM
i would definately consider debian.
i did this to an old pII with 64mb of ram and a 6gb hdd.
it takes about 5 minutes to load, but once its there, its ready for some remote desktop frenzy :)

so i bet you will be ok with that "old" notebook.

PetePete
April 28th, 2008, 02:44 PM
use as a server
thats what I did why my old laptop, bunnged it into a drawer and cabled it up.

old laptops are great for servers...
Can use even if screen/keyboard is broken (VNC, ssh)
take up little room (can store in drawers!)
dont make much noise (can leave on all the time without whirling fan noises)


possible uses:
file server/back up server, remote secure proxy server for when using public hotspots, web server, ......

I've got ubuntu server 7.10 running on a 1ghz PIII, 256mb RAM . works like a charm. (74 days uptime so far :) )

smoker
April 28th, 2008, 04:28 PM
dell manuals are usually pretty good, you'll get one here:
http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/support/my_systems_info/manuals?~ck=ln&c=us&l=en&lnki=0&s=gen

frup
April 28th, 2008, 11:16 PM
1.8 GHz is not at all 'old' imho, especially if you can find some more RAM.

But brushing up seemingly old/obsolete hardware to a completely functional system is quite fun.

Good luck and have fun ;)


yes 1.8 GHZ isnīt that slow, itś actually got a faster processor than my desktop (why replace it when it still works fine)

The trouble with the ram is that itś sdram with a low hz and is quite expensive compared to other ram where I can find it stocked.... another 128mb would be $50. I was really hoping to find 512.

I didnīt think about debian. I will probably give that a go. A newer kernel and default apps would be nice for this (probably just use it for backing up photos on and web browsing)

K.Mandla
April 29th, 2008, 01:07 AM
Keep it. 8200s were great machines. I have an 8000 that I won't part with. You can upgrade that to 512Mb of PC133, add a 64Mb Nvidia Geforce 440 Go and probably find a 2.4Ghz Pentium 4 to drop into it, and you'll have a machine that's probably just as good as anything you get new at an electronics shop.

Watch for 1600x1200 high-resolution screens, 8x dual layer DVD+-RWs that fit the side bay and front-loading modular hard drives that you can run as secondary storage volumes. Plus more external drive options with a cable and doghouse, double-batteries if you want, modular optical drives for disc-to-disc copying, or just a dumb old floppy drive in the front. It's an incredibly flexible machine and was really the last of the line before Dell started changing their format to the 8600 style.

And put Arch on it and it will fly.

skymera
April 29th, 2008, 01:16 AM
Glad you got it going.

If you want to stay Ubuntu but lighter than XFCE try gOS with Enlightenment.

Runs my laptop like a top brand new one!

frup
April 30th, 2008, 04:19 AM
Keep it. 8200s were great machines. I have an 8000 that I won't part with. You can upgrade that to 512Mb of PC133, add a 64Mb Nvidia Geforce 440 Go and probably find a 2.4Ghz Pentium 4 to drop into it, and you'll have a machine that's probably just as good as anything you get new at an electronics shop.

Watch for 1600x1200 high-resolution screens, 8x dual layer DVD+-RWs that fit the side bay and front-loading modular hard drives that you can run as secondary storage volumes. Plus more external drive options with a cable and doghouse, double-batteries if you want, modular optical drives for disc-to-disc copying, or just a dumb old floppy drive in the front. It's an incredibly flexible machine and was really the last of the line before Dell started changing their format to the 8600 style.

And put Arch on it and it will fly.

I read last night that alternate xubuntu 8.04 needs only 64mb ram to install. I will probably get this soon. The screen is already running at 1600x1200 resolution in Mandrake I think. As for the ram (the main issue) it's very hard to find a 512mb stick in New Zealand of 133mhz. plus it costs a lot compared to say a modern 512mb stick :S.