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View Full Version : [ubuntu] [SOLVED] Compatible Computer?



javagamer
April 22nd, 2008, 09:55 PM
I'm planning on building my first computer and I'd like to be sure everything I'm putting in it is compatible with Ubuntu. All the parts are listed at my newegg wish list (https://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/Wishlist/PublicWishDetail.asp?WishListNumber=11239127&WishListTitle=DIY+Computer). I know the nVidia Graphics driver currently has some performance issues, but I trust nVidia will fix them.
Does anyone see something which looks like it could be a problem?
Thanks in advance.

(Click newegg wish list to visit it or just copy paste https://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/Wishlist/PublicWishDetail.asp?WishListNumber=11239127&WishListTitle=DIY+Computer)

CyberCowboy
April 22nd, 2008, 10:13 PM
eh, wanna throw a link to the wishlist so we can take a look for you?

javagamer
April 22nd, 2008, 11:20 PM
Sorry about the link, I think it just isn't visible. It should work if you click "newegg wish list".

CyberCowboy
April 22nd, 2008, 11:47 PM
eh maybe I'm doing something wrong but still not seeing a link, can you just throw a straight address?

Joeb454
April 22nd, 2008, 11:52 PM
It's on the top line :)

It's because the forum upgrade hasn't been made to parse links in different colors yet :), for what it's worth, the link is below :)

Click Me For The WishList (https://secure.newegg.com/NewVersion/Wishlist/PublicWishDetail.asp?WishListNumber=11239127&WishListTitle=DIY+Computer)

Color added by myself :)

CyberCowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 02:55 AM
Ah fair enough, sorry. Actually everything looks good, I'm running the same processor on my main machine, and the motherboard on a different both running Ubuntu (well Xubuntu on one of them) without a hitch. One question though, what are your backup plans? I see only 1 HD. I just recently had a HD take a dive that I wasn't backing up. As long as you're getting a new machine, if you've got the cash put another HD in and do a RAID 1, or if you have a spare computer laying around use something like RESTORE (LINK (http://restore.holonyx.com/))

I am not affiliated with Restore, other than a user

Temüjin
April 23rd, 2008, 04:29 AM
The 750W PSU is massive overkill. You're going to be wasting power because running a powerful PSU with low load isn't efficient (although Corsair/Seasonic PSU's are top-notch in efficiency, so it won't be terribly inefficient). See http://www.silentpcreview.com/article699-page1.html

I personally didn't care for the Logitech X-230's (gave them to my m0m). They had excellent bass response, but no mids, and the highs were a bit muddled.

I don't see a CPU on the list :?

CyberCowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 01:32 PM
Processor is on there, Intel Quad Core....

As for the PSU I disagree, I'd rather have a PS that is over-kill up front, than one that I can't add any type of expansion later without replacing the PSU again. Plus we don't know how many, if any add-on's he's plugging in after the fact.

My 2 bits

Joeb454
April 23rd, 2008, 01:36 PM
This is true. Without looking at the wishlist I can say right now that if you want a high-end graphics card in there, it'll suck up a lot of power. Plus adding another HDD or 2 can add to the power load.

Having said that 500W might be better, I don't know :)

Limpan
April 23rd, 2008, 01:46 PM
But a normal HDD uses only about 10-20W of power. Only problem you could run into is when you start them all at the same time. But with less than 4 drives I would not care to worry about it.

CyberCowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 01:57 PM
I just tend to like to provide more power than people think I'll ever need. I remember when I got my first 500 W PSU, people on-line were telling me it was over kill and I'd never use that much power.... I see now there are a few 1Kilowatt PSU's out there, someone's using them :)

I also tend to run a number of USB powered devices however so it will depend on what the OP is planning to use the box for. If he's a gamer 750W seems about right, if he's just surfing the web, chatting and such, well then he doesn't need a new machine anyway more than likely, save money and get an older system to throw *buntu on and be done with it.

Limpan
April 23rd, 2008, 07:15 PM
Well, USB powered devices aren't allowed to draw that much power. Absolute maximum is 500 mA and that translates to 2.5 W. So you'll have to run quite a lot of USB devices to justify anything in the PSU department.
As long as the PSU is of decent quality anything over say 350 W is for the birds, so to speak. The only reason the 1 kW units exist is customers that reason that you do.

My recommendation would be to buy a 350 W 80+ PSU. I myself have an EarthWatts unit from Antec. Then you'll have quite a lot of margin and still not waste too much power.

EDIT: What is the intended use of the computer?

screwballl
April 23rd, 2008, 08:57 PM
From a builders perspective:
The 680-780i is a problematic chipset regardless of what OS and should only be bought if you plan to use or are using SLI.
You would be better off with a X38 or X48 chipset (DDR2 based) and DDR2-1066.
The 750W power supply is about right as it leaves some overhead for any additional hardware you may add in the future and Corsair is a strong company. I have the Corsair HX620W modular.

For the video card, look into eVGA as they have a lifetime warranty and many times a trade up program for whenever the next generation nvidia cards are released plus their customer support is great!

Also what CPU are you planning to use? Most modern dual and quad cores use anywhere from 65 to 130W which is also why I say good choice with the power supply.
After you look at 65-95W for CPU, 200W for GPU, 20W for hard drives, 50W for main board, you are look at 400W to start with... plus fans and disc drive and other items add a little bit more each time so the 750 leave a little room to grow but not overkill for your build.

javagamer
April 23rd, 2008, 10:02 PM
About the PSU: as many people mentioned, I want to leave myself room since I plan on doing plenty of upgrades later.
About the processor: for a little while I accidentally took it off the list, but now it should be back.
About the M/B: I am strongly considering adding SLI later so I believe I should keep it.
About the graphics card: I choose the ASUS because I heard they also have great customer support and the default fan it comes with is very nice. I'll look into an eVGA, a trade-up program sounds really nice.
About the HD: I considered RAID I, is it easy to set up?
About the speakers: I have heard some mixed criticism of the speakers, does anyone know of any good 2.1 speakers? I don't have room for much more at my desk.
About the lateness of this response: I had originally set new replies to be emailed to me, but I accidentally turned this off so for a while I believed this thread was idle.

Thanks for all the help, I can't wait to finally build this. Once I'm certain about everything I'll order it and get started.

CyberCowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 10:07 PM
Raid 1 is fairly easy, I managed to walk my father through it via phone, if I can do that I truely believe a blind monkey would have no problem :)

Out of curiosity what are you using this machine as? just a General/family computer or something more specific, talking about SLI seems to imply either Gaming or Graphics, but then if gaming I'd think you'd have gone with surround sound speakers etc.

javagamer
April 23rd, 2008, 10:14 PM
Sorry I forgot to mention what I'll be using it for, a little of everything, though gaming and development will be my main uses. I didn't get surround sound since my desk is already a little cramped, does it really make a big difference? If so, surround sound sounds alright, I could probably fit 2 more speakers on my desk.

CyberCowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 10:17 PM
I don't think surround sound makes that big a difference, but I mostly play RPG's not FPS. I was curious is all :D

Temüjin
April 23rd, 2008, 10:37 PM
About the PSU: as many people mentioned, I want to leave myself room since I plan on doing plenty of upgrades later.

It's STILL overkill, but it's your money...

Limpan
April 24th, 2008, 07:14 AM
I don't think surround sound makes that big a difference, but I mostly play RPG's not FPS. I was curious is all :D

It least not if you have the surround speakers on the desk. If you have a wall fairly close behind you and mount the surround speakers on it it would be quite nice. I had it like that once -- really nice with games and all -- but then I got a bit older and decided that surround wasn't for me. :)

And I'll still argue that the PSU is a waste. But hey, it's not my money.

screwballl
April 25th, 2008, 08:00 PM
Planning for upgrades later means it is best to get at least a 750W PSU now. ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE LOOKING AT SLI LATER.
Considering they cost $10-50 more, may as well. Some people would rather spend $200 on a 500W than $250 on a 750W... also remember that quality is always better with a name brand... I would not trust my systems to a non-name brand power supply.

750W is NOT a waste or overkill, it is making sure you have enough power for future upgrades. The PC will only draw what it is using. If the computer is drawing 100W then it doesn't matter if you have a 350W power supply or a 750W power supply, the system only draws 100W at that moment in time. Fire up a game where the video card(s) kick in and the 100W may become 600W quickly.
Most Quality power supplies outlast the life of its first computer anyways. I have a 350W Antec that is in its 3rd system now in 7 years (currently a basic system with E2140, 2GB DDR800, 80GB SATAII, P965-DS3 board, nvidia PCIe 7300GT OC'd, 350W is pushing it with this system but oh well).

Spend the money on the Corsair 750W now and you will NOT be sorry. Some people build for what they have now or like to push the limits, 750W is the smartest move with your expected usage... take it from a system builder with 15+ years experience.

Limpan
April 26th, 2008, 09:59 AM
750W is NOT a waste or overkill, it is making sure you have enough power for future upgrades. The PC will only draw what it is using. If the computer is drawing 100W then it doesn't matter if you have a 350W power supply or a 750W power supply, the system only draws 100W at that moment in time. Fire up a game where the video card(s) kick in and the 100W may become 600W quickly.


Here's were you are wrong. I won't argue that some systems won't be able to use 600W in short moment or anything like that. What I want to clarify is that you reasoning with the 100W.

What the computer parts need and what the PSU draws from the wall socket is not the same thing.
Most PSUs have their highest efficiency somewhere around 70-80% of their maximum rating. That means that the least power is wasted in the CPU when you use 70-80% of the maximum rating. When you get close to the lower end the efficiency gets worse, thus it means that you waste more.
So 200W usage from the computer means 250W (80% efficiency) from the wall socket with the 350W PSU. With a 500W PSU the efficiency might be down by 5% to 75% which means 267W.
The 750W PSU on the other hand would probably be down 10% more to 65% which would mean 308W from the wall socket.
Even if you wouldn't agree on the numbers, the principle is to be taken as a fact. 100W isn't always a 100W and remember, it's what you pull from the wall socket that you pay for.

Where I live (Sweden) we pay about 1SEK = 0.1EUR = 0.16USD for a kWh and that means that 50W extra 24/7 would cost me about 440SEK for a year.

Wasted power in electronics means heat, computers and heat are not a very good combination that some would sell their neighbours dog to get rid of.

But if you're sure you can't do without the extra power you would be a fool to buy anything less. Anyone that puts together a standard computer with non-extreme components should do perfectly fine with a good quality 350W-400W PSU.