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DanielJackins
January 17th, 2008, 04:32 AM
So as a fairly new user to Ubuntu/Linux, I was just wondering how all of you came to know as much as you know. Just over time through help from this forum? Or are there general guides for Ubuntu that you've read?

I'm just curious, as I do want to get good with this OS, but I have no idea how you all became so knowledgeable about it.

yabbadabbadont
January 17th, 2008, 04:34 AM
Painful experience with much cussing and gnashing of teeth. :D

In my case, most of my Linux experience was gained well before Ubuntu existed.

arsenic23
January 17th, 2008, 04:35 AM
1. ) Have problem.
2.) Search forum for answer.
3.) If failure, search internet for answer.
4.) If failure, explain problem to forum.
5.) Remember answer.
6.) Experiment.

Xavieran
January 17th, 2008, 04:35 AM
I read the man pages my boy...:)

It was a combination of reading documentation and simply trying out endless possibilities of things that gave me my inherently large (;)) knowledge...joking about the inherently large part ,I still have heaps to learn about linux and ubuntu...a good book though is the official ubuntu book...It's available for free online and even contains a recipe for *ubuntu* bread :D

rfruth
January 17th, 2008, 04:40 AM
trial n error, forums, google ...

p_quarles
January 17th, 2008, 04:44 AM
A combination of a lot of things:

Google
Reading this and other forums
www.psychocats.net
Several books on Ubuntu and LinuxOnce I got my footing, I found that the man pages for individual commands can be extremely useful, too.

Ultimately, though, I think it's more of an attitude than anything else. If you're willing to be patient, like to figure things out, and don't mind the occasional crash and burn, you can start learning things pretty quickly.

For the record, I'm an intermediate user, and by no means an expert. But I definitely understand things a little better than when I started out. ;)

SunnyRabbiera
January 17th, 2008, 04:46 AM
playing around, mostly

Dr Small
January 17th, 2008, 04:52 AM
trial n error, forums, google ...
+1
That about sums my expirence up ;)
Always tinker and expiriment, and read those man pages !

Dr Small

Zack McCool
January 17th, 2008, 05:01 AM
I learned the basics of using linux over the years using mostly Redhat systems. A few years ago, I took a Redhat Certified Technician class, and got a certification. A couple years later, move up to Redhat Certified Engineer. Lots of good information there, and I still use the books from that for reference.

After getting very comfortable with Redhat, I started using Ubuntu on desktops, and have done like most here. Figure out what you can, search the web for what stumps you, ask questions when you are still stumped, and note the working answers somewhere... :)

aysiu
January 17th, 2008, 05:03 AM
Help others with their problems.

jbaerbock
January 17th, 2008, 05:05 AM
Trial and error, many Distro installes and tests, Man Pages, reading forums etc...

Sef
January 17th, 2008, 05:05 AM
Moved to community cafe.

bufsabre666
January 17th, 2008, 05:06 AM
listening and paying attention, a few books

remember youre not done learning till you know everything

Rotaj
January 17th, 2008, 05:06 AM
The simplest answer is time.
I did not learn DOS or Windows in a day.
I know I will not learn linux in a day.

p_quarles
January 17th, 2008, 05:07 AM
Help others with their problems.
Yes, good point. I've learned quite a bit by looking for info on problems I've never encountered myself. Much of the time, this leads to my figuring out how to do something that I'd never thought of before.

Kedster
January 17th, 2008, 05:13 AM
well there 4 ways

first i come on the forums and read any problems and thin actually then i find the solution in that forum then i either subscribe to it or copy paste it then later i memorize it and try to help others by passing it on as my own or telling them were to go or tweaking what i no for myself or others to use


any problem i get that i never herd about i start a thread ask these ppl than do what they say to do and tel others how to


also i read lots of the ubuntu "documentation" and guides on the net and then tell ppl to go there


also i really like knowing what commands do i lok into how they work what they actually achieve and how?when i can use them for personal use. all it is is don't just take it a mindless jiber jabber look read research about command if u don't no what a command does i advise to find out it will further ur knowledge oh if u no what commands do u can have a lot of fun playing around with them put them to there full pinochle

~LoKe
January 17th, 2008, 05:14 AM
I don't forget most of what I read. I might lose specific details (usually syntax for a command) but I remember the general idea well enough to look it up.

23meg
January 17th, 2008, 05:20 AM
Reading documentation, asking questions, trial and error.

You may find the Ubuntu 7.10 desktop course (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=646043) useful.

wispygalaxy
January 17th, 2008, 05:30 AM
I read the man pages my boy...:)

It was a combination of reading documentation and simply trying out endless possibilities of things that gave me my inherently large (;)) knowledge...joking about the inherently large part ,I still have heaps to learn about linux and ubuntu...a good book though is the official ubuntu book...It's available for free online and even contains a recipe for *ubuntu* bread :D

Here's some Ubuntu cola to go with that Ubuntu bread! :lol:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/unknowndomain/1933721475/

Casual Fan
January 17th, 2008, 05:37 AM
Painful experience with much cussing and gnashing of teeth. :D

Hey, me too! :)

Check out linux.org and tuxfiles.org.

PurposeOfReason
January 17th, 2008, 05:40 AM
I read man pages and though I knew what was up. Then I did my first install of archlinux and I realized I knew nothing. Arch was probably what taught me most. When I just started with ubuntu I knew what was going on the surface level but arch taught me what happens all around and how to make everything work just as you want.

I'll probably say the same thing if I ever install gentoo too. lol

bazzawill
January 17th, 2008, 05:46 AM
I agree with what has been said before, forums, google, etc. One thing that I have found most benificial is if you come across a problem and find a solution on a forum or google before you go through the steps find out what you are doing. This not only protects you from potentially malicous suggestions but makes things easier to remember and then figure out how to solve other problems. Often when I come across a problem now I find I can solve it with various commands I have picked up through previous forum posts, and google searchers. It can also be useful to go through the forums and read other peoples problems maybe you can help (that will also increase you're proficiancy) and also maybe you might be in the same situation one day and will already have the answer. Ultimatly the more problems you solve the more you know, thats my motto anyway

jrusso2
January 17th, 2008, 05:58 AM
I actually went out and bought Linux books. Then I broke it and reinstalled it a lot.

Asked a lot of questions on usenet. And searched for answers.

Somenoob
January 17th, 2008, 06:08 AM
Documentation reading and use.

Monster_user
January 17th, 2008, 06:16 AM
It can also be useful to go through the forums and read other peoples problems maybe you can help (that will also increase you're proficiancy)

That is my motto as well. I don't spend much time on the Ubuntu Forums, except for when I have my own problems. On the forums I do visit frequently, I regularly track down answers to other's tech questions, using forums, and Google.

Having done this for five years, I have learned a lot.

The problem with that is, the more you know, the more difficult/bigger the problems you can get into. Then its harder to find answers to those questions.

paintba||er
January 17th, 2008, 06:17 AM
I'm still a n00b and don't know a lot, but the knowledge I do have I have acquired by just jumping in. I installed Linux, and would come across problems or things that I would want to do, so I would try to figure it out on my own, and if I failed at that I would consult Google.com/linux. Thats pretty much it. I haven't really been a big part of any Linux forums yet because I find that I don't have the knowledge to reply to many posts so I get bored and leave the Linux forums.

And as others have already mentioned, the man pages are always extremely useful.

cmittle
January 17th, 2008, 07:11 AM
A common thread between a lot of these is remembering what you've done already. Sometimes this can be difficult. I have started a personal wiki (http://pardus-larus.student.utwente.nl/~pardus/projects/zim/) on my desktop to help me remember things (also to research my projects).
Also I'd agree with what a lot of people have said, dive in when you run into things, search forums and google for the problems, post new questions if you can't find something, and after you've started learning prowl the absolute beginners talk forums and be the first one to respond to a question pertaining to something you just solved yourself. It's very rewarding to have someone thank you for your help.

Also, after you start to know what you're doing in the command line begin to be a little extra cautious because you probably still don't. (I just made this mistake and now have a fresh install of 7.10 on my laptop :) )

yabbadabbadont
January 17th, 2008, 07:27 AM
Also, after you start to know what you're doing in the command line begin to be a little extra cautious because you probably still don't. (I just made this mistake and now have a fresh install of 7.10 on my laptop :) )

The very best way to learn... I'm willing to bet that you will never forget that mistake again. :D

I learned to always check for accidentally included spaces in wildcard patterns the hard way... by wiping out all of the custom source code for over a hundred customers at the first Unix programming job I had. They didn't do regular backups at that time either. Fortunately, my mentor at the time was psychic. On a whim, he had made a full backup the night before. My next task was to design and implement a proper backup plan. :lol:

Revision control got implemented after a similar incident. (I wasn't involved in that one fortunately.)

SZF2001
January 17th, 2008, 07:30 AM
I don't have a social life.

wolfen69
January 17th, 2008, 07:50 AM
1. ) Have problem.
2.) Search forum for answer.
3.) If failure, search internet for answer.
4.) If failure, explain problem to forum.
5.) Remember answer.
6.) Experiment.

what he said. especially #6

allforcarrie
January 17th, 2008, 08:05 AM
Google!

Joeb454
January 17th, 2008, 10:45 AM
Just by changing stuff and then realising I'd broke it...so I tried to fix it again afterwards :)

brunovecchi
January 17th, 2008, 11:07 AM
Particular aspects about my specific needs I learned from forums.

General aspects about Linux, I read a couple of books that really helped me get a general idea of what this all was about:


Cristopher Negus: Linux Bible 2006: Boot up to Fedora KNOPPIX Debian SUSE Ubuntu and 7 Other Distributions. Wiley, 2006.

Keir Thomas: Beginning Ubuntu Linux. From Novice to Professional. Apress, 2006

Linux for Dummies.

William von Hagen: Ubuntu Linux Bible. Wiley, 2007.


I highly recommend them.

Joeb454
January 17th, 2008, 11:14 AM
I'd actually recommend using it in a Virtual Machine for a while before installing it properly, that's what I did, I used Linux for about 2 or 3 months in a VM before installing properly, that way if I totally borked it, I could just reinstall :)

billgoldberg
January 17th, 2008, 11:55 AM
By using it all the time, reading up on it, taking tutorials, messing around with the system, reading the forums, ...

You can always take courses in schools about linux, that would do the trick to I think.

FurryNemesis
January 17th, 2008, 12:04 PM
Regarding Linux:

1. Research - Man pages, reading the forums, go on IRC, researching potential problems. Am I likely to (kill X, muck up my Fstab/Grub/Xorg.conf) with what I'm trying to do? Think about what I'm going to do if I foul up.

2. Follow a guide or take educated guesses.

3. Invariably: foul up. Kill X, render machine unbootable, that kind of thing.

4. Read forums again or post problem if solution not already found.

5. If it's a minor problem, look at logs and see what went wrong. Try and fix it.

6. If it's a major problem, wait for a solution. Use backup partition in the meantime.

Nano Geek
January 17th, 2008, 02:06 PM
Usually I my learning process goes something like this:


Mess with settings
Break something
Try to fix by my self
Break even more
Panic and look for help on the forum/wiki
Find solution
Fix breakage
Remember solution for later referenceUsually goes something like that. :)

macogw
January 17th, 2008, 06:18 PM
Reading all of the help suggestions given on here and on IRC has taught me a lot. When I try to help others with their problems, I often have to read about the topic a bit, so then I learn more. And well, ya know, the Wikipedia effect sometimes grabs hold and I end up reading a lot more in-depth than necessary just to satisfy curiosity. I read blog posts about Linux fairly often too, usually when I'm trying to find something out.

I learned my way around the command line by reading the manpages of commands I knew a bit about (like apt-get) to get an understanding of how manpages work, then just checked manpages any time I didn't know how to use something (or wanted to know which part made what happen).

Hanging out on #linuxchix has taught me a lot too. Mostly the chatter in there isn't really Linux-related, but there's, as one person put it "more Unix know-how than you can shake a stick at" in that channel. That's usually where I ask questions, and everybody's patient with beginners. Sometimes the tech discussions are on things as simple as symlinks and basic bash commands, other times there's talk of networking things I don't understand, and once the resident kernel hacker gave a little "class" on the kernel. Random little useful things always pop up too, like one person saying that the trouble with man is you need to know the name of the command. A few of us popped up to point out there's an option for man, -k, which lets you search the manpages for keywords to find the command you want.

markp1989
January 17th, 2008, 06:25 PM
1. ) Have problem.
2.) Search forum for answer.
3.) If failure, search internet for answer.
4.) If failure, explain problem to forum.
5.) Remember answer.
6.) Experiment.

+1

still consider my self a noob

mmichalik
January 17th, 2008, 06:31 PM
many years of trial and error and getting beat up by it during the entire time.

I have been using Linux and Unix, in one form or another for close to 10 years now and I still consider myself only intermittently experienced and I rely on a lot of posts here in this forum and out on the net to help me through.

The good thing is the longer you stick with it, the faster you will be able to figure out your issues because you will know what to look for.

FuturePilot
January 17th, 2008, 06:31 PM
Pretty much experimenting with things and also just hanging around here I picked up a whole bunch of stuff. In fact I still am. ;)

lemming552
January 18th, 2008, 06:23 PM
Used Unix since the early 80s and did installs of many different OS's including Prime, VMS, AIX, and then bunches of the Unix styles, then started playing with Linux early on. Ubuntu is a bit of a break for me. ;)

A lot of experimenting and pushing boundaries goes a long way in learning how to do the usual stuff. I also did QA for 20 years, so poking at stuff is in my nature now.

macogw
January 18th, 2008, 07:06 PM
Usually I my learning process goes something like this:


Mess with settings
Break something
Try to fix by my self
Break even more
Panic and look for help on the forum/wiki
Find solution
Fix breakage
Remember solution for later referenceUsually goes something like that. :)

Ah, the old "if it ain't broken, take it apart and fix it" method! That's always fun.

Monster_user
January 20th, 2008, 06:44 AM
:lolflag:

Whats bad, is when you've got somebody that just leaves it in pieces, and never puts it back together.

Say for instance, a VCR.

Presto123
January 20th, 2008, 06:48 AM
Ha. Guilty here.

Personally, I crash the computer, grumble, reinstall, and then goto forums. :P

bonzodog
January 20th, 2008, 06:54 PM
I learnt mostly by trial and error, and I am still learning. Not just that, but my learning curve with linux started back in 1996 on an SLS server, with no GUI's or anything. My next big learning curve was on Caldera 1.3 in 99, with KDE 1.0. I had to learn linux starting on the command line, and I also pushed myself into it by switching to Slackware, which does not hold your hand in any way.

ubuntuman001
January 20th, 2008, 08:41 PM
1. ) Have problem.
2.) Search forum for answer.
3.) If failure, search internet for answer.
4.) If failure, explain problem to forum.
5.) Remember answer.
6.) Experiment.I think this post definitely qualifies for a sticky under the absolute beginner section.