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View Full Version : Linuxant etc.



HW_Hack
January 13th, 2008, 09:03 PM
So kind of a philosophical question for the community.

Should companies (or service / solution providers) like Linuxant be supported and promoted in conjunction with Linux (be it Ubuntu - Fedora - SUSE) ? Especially if the service in question solves a problem and brings more or less skilled users into the Linux fold ?


Issue for me is I volunteered to install Ubuntu onto a friends laptop only to discover he had the "laptop from hell" when in came to wireless -- Dell 5150 with a BCM4309. I'm moderately skilled in Linux and my own Dell laptop has the anit-christ BCM4318 which I've been able to do an NDISwrapper for a few times.

But I was at my wits end on the BCM4309 - I then came across the Linuxant site and within 15 minutes and 2 driver file attempts I had the built in wireless working. The service was very easy to use and for a cost of $20 (less than buying a PCMCIA card) was very reasonable.

My friend is now very excited and busily migrating away from XP.

So frankly I'm impressed and I think as long as I can get an OS for free - paying for a service or even specially translated software is fine thing - especially in bringing SW to the masses.

vexorian
January 13th, 2008, 09:18 PM
So kind of a philosophical question for the community.

Should companies (or service / solution providers) like Linuxant be supported and promoted in conjunction with Linux (be it Ubuntu - Fedora - SUSE) ? Especially if the service in question solves a problem and brings more or less skilled users into the Linux fold ?


Issue for me is I volunteered to install Ubuntu onto a friends laptop only to discover he had the "laptop from hell" when in came to wireless -- Dell 5150 with a BCM4309. I'm moderately skilled in Linux and my own Dell laptop has the anit-christ BCM4318 which I've been able to do an NDISwrapper for a few times.

But I was at my wits end on the BCM4309 - I then came across the Linuxant site and within 15 minutes and 2 driver file attempts I had the built in wireless working. The service was very easy to use and for a cost of $20 (less than buying a PCMCIA card) was very reasonable.

My friend is now very excited and busily migrating away from XP.

So frankly I'm impressed and I think as long as I can get an OS for free - paying for a service or even specially translated software is fine thing - especially in bringing SW to the masses.
I was unable to find out what Linuxant was.

I sort of think you answered yourself. Linuxant is "sopported" enough, your friend was able to find it, and people that need it can use it and pay those bugs, while people that don't need/want it can avoid so as well.

original_jamingrit
January 14th, 2008, 12:37 AM
Services like this are great not just for the individual, but for allowing the free software community at large to grow. Not only that, but the provide more jobs for linux-enthusiasts, and provide an in for linux-newbies. While their main goal is to turn a profit, companies that provide technical support for FLOSS are okay in my books.

AndyCooll
January 14th, 2008, 12:59 AM
This question has been asked plenty of times before. The bottom line is that making money is ok, Red Hat, Novell and Canonical all spring to mind as companies seeking to make a profit using FLOSS.

The acronym FLOSS itself is used to make it clear that it's free as in freedom, not necessarily cost.

If there's a cost to it you yourself may choose to avoid it, but that's you using your personal freedom of choice.

:cool:

Dr. C
January 14th, 2008, 04:04 AM
So kind of a philosophical question for the community.

Should companies (or service / solution providers) like Linuxant be supported and promoted in conjunction with Linux (be it Ubuntu - Fedora - SUSE) ? Especially if the service in question solves a problem and brings more or less skilled users into the Linux fold ?


Issue for me is I volunteered to install Ubuntu onto a friends laptop only to discover he had the "laptop from hell" when in came to wireless -- Dell 5150 with a BCM4309. I'm moderately skilled in Linux and my own Dell laptop has the anit-christ BCM4318 which I've been able to do an NDISwrapper for a few times.

But I was at my wits end on the BCM4309 - I then came across the Linuxant site and within 15 minutes and 2 driver file attempts I had the built in wireless working. The service was very easy to use and for a cost of $20 (less than buying a PCMCIA card) was very reasonable.

My friend is now very excited and busily migrating away from XP.

So frankly I'm impressed and I think as long as I can get an OS for free - paying for a service or even specially translated software is fine thing - especially in bringing SW to the masses.

The big issue I have with Linuxant is what happens if the kernel is upgraded and their driver no longer works? Do you have to pay again? This is not like the Nvidia drivers that are free as in beer. My take is it may turn out to be more cost effective to buy an adapter that is compatible with FLOSS in the first place.

This is not just a propriety driver but a trap to pay an ongoing license fee over a measly driver.

vexorian
January 14th, 2008, 05:20 AM
By the way, you don't really need a new "compile" of MS office, Office 2003 is getting very good ranks on WINE: http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?iVersionId=3214

Else you can try the one paid version of WINE that's supported to improve office compatibility.

If you already have a windows license, then you can do what I do and run MSOffice on virtual box with seamless windows.

(I only run MSOffice when there is a critical format-driven lock-in, else it is openoffice all the way :)