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View Full Version : what does linux in the workplace look like?



fuscia
January 4th, 2008, 06:20 PM
i don't think i've ever used a computer in the workplace. i have no idea what the environments are like. so, if a company uses linux, what does the average receptionist's desktop look like, for example?

bufsabre666
January 4th, 2008, 06:24 PM
spread sheets word processors and time charts

same as windows, but prettier cause of the addition of compiz

personally i installed all the computers at my uncles auto shop and i put linux on them and the secretary always has those open and the other computers are all internet parts data bases, so its not much differnt from windows in my case

Onyros
January 4th, 2008, 06:57 PM
I helped an advertising agency I worked for get rid of Windows altogether. Being an advertising agency, they obviously and mostly have Macs around, but all their PC's (2 LOL) now have Linux installed.

They're both using a normal GNOME desktop (they preferred it over KDE or anything else I threw at them). One's running Arch and the other's running Ubuntu, but they're pretty much simple desktops. The Ubuntu desktop has Virtualbox installed due to legacy accounting software, which they're trying to get rid of as soon as possible.

Oh, and no Compiz. They're meant for work, not for wobbling and burning windows :P

Company wallpaper, custom fonts, customized looks but on very basic level. Didn't take much time for them to grow into that, as I removed all possible obstacles (flash, display configs, the works).

One thing that I didn't expect, they both use and love using workplaces... It's one of the killer features for them. And the fact that they don't have to run AV's, and anti-spywares, and that their computers are now fully functional, too.

They also run Evolution (preferred over Thunderbird), Osmo (http://clay.ll.pl/osmo/) (for Contacts + Dates + Tasks), Firefox and Opera, Gnumeric over Calc, AbiWord whenever possible and OOo apps for the rest.

Other than that, I set up a webcalendar with which they sync from time to time or insert new events locally, so their browsers are always open.

chocbar31
January 4th, 2008, 07:08 PM
It looks exactly like the one you are using to post this question. I would say the difference is the applications installed and/or intentionally left out.

The desktop look and feel is pretty much always left to the user. You place or remove what is desired on your desktop...same as you do at home.

You prepare email, documents, and everything else on the computer; as if you were at home again.

The biggest difference would be that office systems have techs working on the best possible solutions for security and usability...also, the techs or corporation controls the environment or ways in which the computer will be used or not used; whereas the home user controls their own computer.

p_quarles
January 4th, 2008, 07:10 PM
It looks exactly like the one you are using to post this question.
You have obviously never seen any of fuscia's desktop screenshots. :)

Lostincyberspace
January 4th, 2008, 07:21 PM
like Linux.

chocbar31
January 4th, 2008, 07:26 PM
hehehehe...:lolflag:

remember that commercial? Honey, I finished the Internet! I have ran across one or two when I was looking for elegance.

I have also assisted one or two to get pretty. A year ago I would not have used pretty, however, the technology is getting better and better and apps crash so much less. Again, if the look and feel does not crash apps and comfort allows you to get more work done go for it.

Again, again, again, to organization develops a culture over time. If it is not allowed, then save it for your own boxes. Usually, everyone who sees my desktop gets affixed and then they want it.

Who knows, if she was a marketer, she can change how the desktop looks. I know our marketers have changed how our desktops look all the way through to the screensaver. I am helpdesk for goodness sake how did we loose ground on the computer?

fuscia
January 4th, 2008, 07:38 PM
You have obviously never seen any of fuscia's desktop screenshots. :)

i was wondering how they could look at that for eight hours straight.

BDNiner
January 4th, 2008, 07:39 PM
Mine looks very much like my desktop at home, except i have icons in AWN that i use more often at work like Angry IP Scanner, Terminal Server Client. And i have more network shares mounted on my desktop than i do at home.

Lostincyberspace
January 4th, 2008, 07:41 PM
You have obviously never seen any of fuscia's desktop screenshots. :)
I haven't but it would be nice to see.

KiwiNZ
January 4th, 2008, 08:05 PM
The systems I have sold and installed have used the a variety of Distros , Red Hat , Suse and Ubuntu mainly.

In the most part they have been customised to the clients specification and locked down.

The vast majority have most of the eyecandy removed especially Compiz as it is surplus to requirements in a enterprize install. The games are also usually removed.

TrailerTrash
January 4th, 2008, 09:37 PM
If you wana see a business Linux desktop in action, then go visit a Auto Zone, and/or a Days Inn (here in the USA). I know Auto Zone is using Red Hat, and im not sure what Days Inn is using. Also the Chrysler HQ in Michigan is using Linux. I know many other business that run Linux, but cant think of them right now.

BTW, I own a small used car dealership and a small Satellite install company and i use Linux (CentOS on servers and Xandros business on the desktop).

cwej
January 5th, 2008, 07:40 AM
Well, I arrive at work, plug my GNU/Linux laptop into the LAN. I create, or open and edit, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation files with OpenOffice.org, and save them back out either as .doc file or .pdf, depending...(mostly Windows environment).

I use Evolution for email, or OWA when accessing email from the web.

Occasionally I'll need to deal with an MS Office file with some interoperability issue, usually having to do with an embedded graphic created/saved in a proprietary MS format. For that contingency (increasingly rare), I bought Crossover Office and installed my old (yes bought and paid for -- installed nowhere else!) MS Office 2000. I hardly ever use it, since I also have Abi Word, which usually works if OO doesn't. I have yet to have any interoperability issues with OO to Excel (and I create pretty complex spreadsheets with macros, validation, and formuli). The rare Excel to OO issues usually involves charts. Same thing with OO to PowerPoint.

fedex1993
January 5th, 2008, 07:41 AM
The systems I have sold and installed have used the a variety of Distros , Red Hat , Suse and Ubuntu mainly.

In the most part they have been customised to the clients specification and locked down.

The vast majority have most of the eyecandy removed especially Compiz as it is surplus to requirements in a enterprize install. The games are also usually removed.

well what do you mean by locked down like they cant install anything at all or somethig else in secruity