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-grubby
December 26th, 2007, 04:44 AM
Currently I'm learning my first language, Python, so I'll have to say no,learning my first language
EDIT: oh yes, could you list what languages you know (or are learning)
EDIT1: due to confusion by the post below, I mean desktop programming languages

TeraDyne
December 26th, 2007, 04:48 AM
I'm going to assume you mean desktop app languages rather than web app languages.

Currently, I'm trying to learn Java, It's a bit hard, but I'm enjoying it.

LaRoza
December 26th, 2007, 04:51 AM
See my wiki

init1
December 26th, 2007, 04:54 AM
I know a bit of several languages, but mostly Javascript.
EDIT:
I know that's not a desktop programming language, but it's still my primary language.

Bungo Pony
December 26th, 2007, 04:58 AM
I know how to program in BASIC (yes, I know it's useless today :) ).

I used to know a bit of HTML until editors did away with that. I've also programmed the SALT script language which comes with a DOS program called "Telix". Oh yeah, and then there's DOS batch files.

I'm pretty outdated.

rfruth
December 26th, 2007, 04:59 AM
Workn on C (++) myself and have been for longer than I care to remember ...

Lostincyberspace
December 26th, 2007, 05:00 AM
No but I am kind of learning java and python

vishzilla
December 26th, 2007, 05:03 AM
I know C++, currently learning Java

p_quarles
December 26th, 2007, 05:04 AM
Learning Python as well. My goal is to learn enough to create a simple GTK or ncurses front-end for fbsetbg.

Please note: if you're going to ruin my idea by linking to a similar application that already exists, I just request that you provide me with a new and similarly simple project. ;)

-grubby
December 26th, 2007, 05:07 AM
Learning Python as well. My goal is to learn enough to create a simple GTK or ncurses front-end for fbsetbg.

Please note: if you're going to ruin my idea by linking to a similar application that already exists, I just request that you provide me with a new and similarly simple project. ;)

Oh I can't ruin it because I know of no such app. Good Idea actually. I was thinking of making an app that told how many days of school were left (at least at my school) by entering the date. But maybe I should put that on hold and make something else for fluxbox :)

odiseo77
December 26th, 2007, 05:10 AM
No, I don't. I wish I knew, though.
(I only have a very limited bash scripting knowledge, but that doesn't count as a desktop language, I think)...

odiseo77
December 26th, 2007, 05:20 AM
Sorry for the bump, double post and for the little off topic, but where do you people have learned how to program? Only by reading on the net? Or are you folks software engineers, have taken any programming course, etc.? (Just curious since I'm interested in learning a programming language eventually) :)

-grubby
December 26th, 2007, 05:22 AM
Sorry for the bump, double post and for the little off topic, but where do you people have learned how to program? Only by reading on the net? Or are you folks software engineers, have taken any programming course, etc.? (Just curious since I'm interested in learning a programming language eventually) :)

well you could pick up a book on programming

LookTJ
December 26th, 2007, 05:24 AM
print "Currently trying to", "learn Python.":)

odiseo77
December 26th, 2007, 05:28 AM
well you could pick up a book on programming

I have a book on bash scripting, tcl/tk, perl and gawk, but I've only read parts of the bash section (I think I need someone teaching me in the real life, so maybe I'll take a course about python, since it seems to be so popular among the linux community). Thanks for the advice :)

jflaker
December 26th, 2007, 05:39 AM
Sorry for the bump, double post and for the little off topic, but where do you people have learned how to program? Only by reading on the net? Or are you folks software engineers, have taken any programming course, etc.? (Just curious since I'm interested in learning a programming language eventually) :)

One thing about programming, you really must have an end in mind to create a program. Programming solves problems or provides some level of automation to routine and/or tedious tasks.

One way to learn some programming is to identify something you do all the time and write code to get it done either by interaction or a scheduled job. With that said, use the "keep it simple" method when starting out and use a scripting language to start off (as a suggestion).

So, what do you do all the time that the computer could do for you? Create a program and enjoy your extra time.

odiseo77
December 26th, 2007, 06:01 AM
One thing about programming, you really must have an end in mind to create a program. Programming solves problems or provides some level of automation to routine and/or tedious tasks.

One way to learn some programming is to identify something you do all the time and write code to get it done either by interaction or a scheduled job. With that said, use the "keep it simple" method when starting out and use a scripting language to start off (as a suggestion).

So, what do you do all the time that the computer could do for you? Create a program and enjoy your extra time.

Yes, I know what you mean. Some months ago, when I was trying to learn how to write scripts in bash I was presented with a simple exercise (for example, "create a script that counts the days of the week", etc.), I had the idea, the purpose of the script, but sometimes I found myself like blind, not knowing how to achieve certain tasks (even if I knew the basic syntax I had to follow). One example of this was one time I wanted to create a countdown script by my own, but I had to invoke the 'date' command and invoke other commands I didn't know in order to achieve it, make mathematical operations, etc. but I had no idea how to do it... I guess I'll dust off my programming book and learn some more bash as a starting point, as you suggest :)

cartisdm
December 26th, 2007, 06:20 AM
Looking at the poll I'm happy to see I'm not alone when it comes to not knowing how to program but still a linux user. I've taken a few classes in highschool and next semester I'll be doing C+ at JMU but I'm far from efficient in anything

Judo
December 26th, 2007, 07:07 AM
I've used C, C++, Python, and Perl more often that once. It's safe to say that I know them.

I dove into Java, Lisp, and Assembly, but have not actually used them. I think it's okay to say that I know Java well enough to use it, but cannot prove it. As for the other two, I have a lot to learn.

My hope is to eventually go to straight binary/hex.

Despite my knowledge of computers, I don't mess with the system. I tend to break things. (grub, gstreamer, x, etc.)

I know many Ubuntu users that do not know how to program, but they do not come to these forums. I'd vote for them if I could.

LaRoza
December 26th, 2007, 07:09 AM
For learning how to program, see my wiki.

t0p
December 26th, 2007, 07:41 AM
Hehe!! :) I can program in one whole language! And guess which one: damn Basic! Shows my age I guess, when I was young we all had microcomputers like the Commodore 64 and the TRASH-80, and we learnt Basic to write on 'em with. Hell, part of my Computer Studies course at school involved writing a program for the BBC-B micros that were in the computer lab!

EDIT: Actually... I know a bit of HTML. And bash scripting language. Though they're not programming languages are they?

LaRoza
December 26th, 2007, 07:51 AM
Hehe!! :) I can program in one whole language! And guess which one: damn Basic! Shows my age I guess, when I was young we all had microcomputers like the Commodore 64 and the TRASH-80, and we learnt Basic to write on 'em with. Hell, part of my Computer Studies course at school involved writing a program for the BBC-B micros that were in the computer lab!

EDIT: Actually... I know a bit of HTML. And bash scripting language. Though they're not programming languages are they?

Bash is.

Kingsley
December 26th, 2007, 08:46 AM
I think programming is interesting, but there's no way I can learn it on my own. I've tried Python, C++, Java, and bash. I need to have a good teacher push me.

mellowd
December 26th, 2007, 08:49 AM
Basic :p

I was doing C++ a few years ago but not seriously enough. I'd like to start learning again soon and might just go with Python. It's really not a requirement in my job though, but I want to anyway

PartisanEntity
December 26th, 2007, 09:50 AM
I am trying to teach myself Python

LaRoza
December 26th, 2007, 09:51 AM
I am trying to teach myself Python

Hows it going?

stijngysemans
December 26th, 2007, 09:53 AM
I know how to program Java, .net (c# and vb.net), cobol, x++ (some propertary microsoft language) and SiebelVb
it's my job :popcorn:

hessiess
December 26th, 2007, 10:21 AM
know alitle bit of afew langwiges, python, c++, dark basic

popch
December 26th, 2007, 11:06 AM
In one of my former jobs I used to be head of a small team which taught programming. As part of other jobs and of my hobbies as well I understood and usefully used some 20 programming languages or more (lost track somewhere) and made one up myself (sort of).

There are no 'desktop' and 'other' programming languages, BTW.

public_void
December 26th, 2007, 01:36 PM
I know C/C++ and C#, and have learned Delphi, but thats long ago. I really need to learn some bash. This has come from going to College and University.

Onyros
December 26th, 2007, 02:00 PM
I don't think HTML qualifies as programming, but I'm definitely going to learn Python.

And once someone said I'd excel in Perl. Goes with my way of thinking (though I don't expect that was a compliment).

I once dominated BASIC. When I was a kid, I'd make custom games in exchange for money to buy new computer games. That's how I got my Speccy collection going hehe.

happysmileman
December 26th, 2007, 02:08 PM
I know Python, C++, ASM, though I don't consider myself to know anything but C++ very well...

Of course there's also brainf*ck if that counts.

Sluipvoet
December 26th, 2007, 02:23 PM
Java
C#

Currently learning C++

Lster
December 26th, 2007, 02:47 PM
I am competent in C, Assembly, many types of BASIC, Java, Visual Basic, HTML and JavaScript. I semi know C#, Python (which I am learning now), Bash and a couple more...

I find learning new languages a doddle after learning C and assembly - which were easier than I thought! My first language was HTML and JavaScript - that was three years ago and I've been hooked to programming/ maths since...

Keith_Beef
December 26th, 2007, 03:02 PM
I started out with various dialects of Basic on Apple ][, Sharp MZ80-K, Sinclair ZX-80, zx-81 and Spectrum.

Then a little Z80 assembly language.

Then a little B.

Then a little Pascal.

Then I left computing altogether for over a decade, and when I came back I tried C, Java, Perl, PHP and Javascript...

Nowadays, most of my "programming" is either

writing are very short scripts to automate repetitive tasks,
or modifying and extending others' work to suit a particular use.


Lately, I've been hacking around JSP to use Lucene to index and search over a set of maintenance manuals.

B.

cellerit
December 26th, 2007, 03:20 PM
c, c++, java, lua, python, some html/css/php, some pascal (woohoo), asm ( m68k and x86 ), First language was java some 2-3 years ago but i dislike java now.
i'm studying computer engineering.

"I find learning new languages a doddle after learning C and assembly"

same here

Zipster90
December 26th, 2007, 03:22 PM
I know how to do the basics of Java, and I'm trying to learn Ruby. I do both of them extremely badly. I'm just not the programming type.

UPDATE: But I am pretty good at the good 'ol HTML.

fatality_uk
December 26th, 2007, 03:40 PM
Then a little Z80 assembly language.
The fastest way to insanity :lolflag:
Assembler, *shuders*

jflaker
December 27th, 2007, 02:47 AM
Yes, I know what you mean. Some months ago, when I was trying to learn how to write scripts in bash I was presented with a simple exercise (for example, "create a script that counts the days of the week", etc.), I had the idea, the purpose of the script, but sometimes I found myself like blind, not knowing how to achieve certain tasks (even if I knew the basic syntax I had to follow). One example of this was one time I wanted to create a countdown script by my own, but I had to invoke the 'date' command and invoke other commands I didn't know in order to achieve it, make mathematical operations, etc. but I had no idea how to do it... I guess I'll dust off my programming book and learn some more bash as a starting point, as you suggest :)

I was trying to find a graphical representation of something that was taught to me in college when learning programming.........
http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_02.htm
Although the "problem" here is not something likely to be programmed, the problem breakdown is exactly how I was taught to break a problem into smaller pieces in order to write code for each piece.........

When doing it this way, you break down the problem into the smallest factor then theoretically, that factor becomes a sub routine or function....... But as you break down the process, you will get a full understanding of what you need to accomplish in code...........

again, the end result is what you are looking for, so program from the right to the left as far as the diagram is concerned

jflaker
December 27th, 2007, 02:49 AM
The fastest way to insanity :lolflag:
Assembler, *shuders*

No, the fastest way to insanity is to get specifications from an end-user, finish the program only to find out that is not what they "meant".................in fact, it isn't even close in either output or logic and requires a complete re-write!

forrestcupp
December 27th, 2007, 03:10 AM
In order learned:

BASIC on C64
Assembly on C64
Python with GTK
C# with .Net and managed DirectX
C++ with wxWidgets

experimented with C++ game engines like Ogre3D & Irrlicht

JillSwift
December 27th, 2007, 04:16 AM
BASIC,
ForTran,
and
Cobol.

What? I'm old! :tongue:

Working on Python now. Dabbled in C and its variants, but I'm not patient enough to use it.

selda
December 27th, 2007, 04:34 AM
I know basic Python; just enough to write simple scripts to make my research easier.

macogw
December 27th, 2007, 05:27 AM
I've learned Visual Basic, but I don't use it.

I know Java the best, some C, some LC-3 assembly (for school), and I'm learning Python now. I've played with modifying a Perl script before and done a little bit of bash scripting, but not much.

Northsider
December 27th, 2007, 07:50 AM
I don't know anything about programming.

FuturePilot
December 27th, 2007, 06:16 PM
No but I would like to learn. Maybe some Python.

klange
December 27th, 2007, 06:28 PM
Forms of Basic: Basic, TI-Basic, VB 6.0, VB.net, Gambas
C: C++, C#, some C
Web Scripting: PHP, some Perl (and of course HTML, Javascript, CSS)
Others: Python, Java, BASH.
Probably more, I tend to forget parts of the list every so often.

Master-of-None
December 27th, 2007, 06:54 PM
I've learned the bare minimum of C++, and Visual Basic 2005

I don't know enough to say I know how to program in them.

Eddie Wilson
December 27th, 2007, 07:07 PM
I'll start off with Basic, OS9-Level 2, Q-Basic, Karel, PLC Ladder Logic, C, Visual Basic, learning Python. All of these are performed on a computer even tho the programs may be used for something else.
Eddie

runningwithscissors
December 27th, 2007, 07:24 PM
I know a few languages.

C, C++, Java, C# and PHP, I use on an almost regular basis.
Apart from those I also know Python and Ruby. And a little Perl as well.

I'd really like to take some time out to learn a functional language. Erlang looks really good.

DonLorenzo
December 29th, 2007, 01:23 AM
Yup.

S/360 assembly language (unused since 1996, but I'll never forget!) ... plus a bunch of related things, some partially forgotten some almost completely forgotten: JCL, EXEC2, REXX, ...

current on:
C/C++
shell script
PHP
SQL
Make, Autotools and related
some others I'd rather not own up to.

HTML, if you want to count it as a language
CSS, see HTML

Sockerdrickan
December 29th, 2007, 02:51 AM
I do this on a daily basis, it's fun.

InfinityCircuit
December 29th, 2007, 04:15 AM
I can program in C, C++, Perl, and BASIC (bash as well of course)...I guess my biggest accomplishment was making a tetris clone in C++ from scratch.

Lostincyberspace
December 29th, 2007, 04:29 AM
Yup.

S/360 assembly language (unused since 1996, but I'll never forget!) ... plus a bunch of related things, some partially forgotten some almost completely forgotten: JCL, EXEC2, REXX, ...

current on:
C/C++
shell script
PHP
SQL
Make, Autotools and related
some others I'd rather not own up to.

HTML, if you want to count it as a language
CSS, see HTML
I guess if you count html/css then I should to. Put me down for more than one.

LinuxMonk
December 31st, 2007, 03:43 AM
Been doing it for over 20 years now. I've worked in XBase (DBASEIII, Clipper, FoxPro), Visual Basic (blech!), SQL, and currently Perl, with a smattering of Bash. Do I "know it all" - not hardly! I learn something new almost every day.

mdsmith
December 31st, 2007, 04:44 AM
I wrote some in PL1 and 360 assembler, couldn't stand Cobol. Probably won't learn any new ones; unless I really need to.:lolflag:

tylerspaska
December 31st, 2007, 04:47 AM
desktop languages? none.

the only thing i can program is my TI-89

klange
December 31st, 2007, 05:26 AM
Thought I'd post this, which I previously posted on a Halo modding forum:



Not as proficient in C or C++ as I'd like to be, but everything else I can do quite a lot in. PHP (http://home.ogunderground.com) VB.net (http://pandemicim.com/) C# (http://home.oasis-games.com/forum.php?do=viewtopic&id=117) , I keep my Java code on an online IDE I created because the computers at my school are soooo slooooow (I'd link to it, but I password protected it to keep people from stealing... Meh, try and crack it :wink: (http://java.ogunderground.com)) Python brings a 2d, top-down, online helicopter battle game, the Pandemic IM server, and a Pandemic client. I've written quite a few Bash scripts to get various jobs done. VB 6.0 I made a very old and poor chatroom program, the predecessor to Pandemic. Another PHP project was the Halo 2 Vista Stat Tracking project, but the rest of the team kinda moved away after I left (stressful work environment, I guess I just couldn't handle working with people who have such differing beliefs than mine, even if they weren't trying to be a pain) You can see how far we got here (http://cerebrum.ogunderground.com/). Perl I've mostly done debugging in, nothing from scratch, so I guess I'm not technically proficient there either (though I know enough about syntax to get something working if I had to). Basic is easy, there's not much to be proficient in. I know another form of "advanced basic" called Gambas that greatly resembles VB, I got half of a Pandemic client written in that. C, I can do basic things but nothing special (I've established a UDP socket, and that's about it). C++ I took a semester class in freshman year of high school. TI-Basic I am extremely proficient in. I wrote a game in Basic that is by far the best available for the TI-83+ (Basic-wise, that is, probably gets beat out by some of the simplest ASM games...)

I should probably get some pics of my Python helicopter game (not that it looked all that amazing, but if it weren't for that, Pandemic would have never existed). I can also get some pics of my Java projects (most of which are still CLI but make great use of the ANSI drivers, and are therefore not very useful on Windows where you have to go through some painful processes to get the drivers running, but Linux has them built in.)


I think that's everything...

Paqman
December 31st, 2007, 05:53 AM
Nope. I wrote some games in BASIC when I was a kid and I spent a couple of weeks twiddling around with assembly language stuff in the airfroce, and I can cobble together a passable website. But I wouldn't know which end of the spanner to hit proper code with.

sujoy
December 31st, 2007, 07:02 AM
Yes, i use C, C++ and Java mostly. Besides I know BASIC and I am learning Perl.

LauraSakura
January 14th, 2008, 03:33 PM
I wouldn't say I'm an expert in anything..
I've done a little Java and VB6, and a moderate amount of HTML
I'm learning VB.NET, BASH Scripting, and some SQL Server Stuff
I want to learn some Python, as well as C++ (with OpenGL) ... but don't have the time right now.

dgray_from_dc
January 14th, 2008, 03:38 PM
Yes.

BASIC, BASICA, QBASIC(Still useful) :lolflag:
C
C++
Learning Python

Praadur
January 14th, 2008, 03:40 PM
I tried not to be as into code as I am, but I suffer OCD when it comes to figuring out how things work and tinkering. At the end of the day, aside from a book on OO coding in Lua, I'm fairly self-taught in a couple of languages.

When a directory presents me with almost human-readable files, which I can freely edit and stuff tends to happen when I do, then I simply must understand those files. I've sent many a game and application on a vacation to meet the venerable Sir Davy Jones at his secret undersea condo, but it's all been thouroughly worthwhile regardless.

These days, I take a slightly more professional approach, and I can actually make my own stuff, but I never lost that urge to see what happens if I do this...

Not the best survival trait, I know.

Dimitriid
January 14th, 2008, 04:06 PM
The most important thing is to understand computer logic and its different approaches, after that is a matter of learning and using syntaxes to construct the same basic idea.

That is one thing I can tell you, as an IT professional, I hate about the industry: so many people obsess about having incredible fluency in a particular development syntax and this is a terrible way to judge one person's ability to understand and use computer languages to produce software. Ive seen tons of job ads that require 3+ years of experience on C# projects...great that means if I have 10 years of experience on other object oriented programming languages I won't know what to do right.?

You would think programming languages, specially high ones that are in more demand nowadays ( I kid you now, Java and Visual Basic: see how many job offers you can find on these two alone ) are supposed to make it easier for people to effectively use the hardware without having to learn the specifics on how it works, yet now experience on Java is required cause some idiot who knows more about management than IT thinks a programmer with an impressive resume won't be able to just pick up the syntaxes in a few days.

Free Hugs
January 14th, 2008, 10:14 PM
VB, C, javascript, vbscript, PHP...

Part of my job is writing web applications. I want to start utilizing Ruby, but my host doesn't have RoR yet so it would be a waste of time.

Nano Geek
January 14th, 2008, 10:28 PM
Kinda sorta know Bash, slowly working on Python.

Irihapeti
January 14th, 2008, 10:41 PM
It depends what you mean. Do I know any language well enough to get a job on the strength of it? Definitely not! But I tinker with things. I've played with Basic (many years ago), and the SALT language mentioned by an early post in this thread. Nowadays I put together bash scripts to do a few things more easily on my computer.

Not exactly programming, I know, but on one actual paid job I had to create a web page by marking up the HTML by hand.

lisati
January 14th, 2008, 10:45 PM
I have a preference for keeping it simple - I learnt BASIC at school, a little COBOL (too verbose, mostly forgotten) on a course which led to a job that used assembler on an IBM MVS system (mostly forgotten too). For all its limitations, there are versions of BASIC around for the newer OSes, FREBASIC comes in versions for Linux, DOS and Windows, as does C.

ubuntuman001
January 15th, 2008, 01:10 AM
nope, don't know any desktop languages, though I do aspire to someday start learning one, perhaps python at first...

kool_kat_os
January 15th, 2008, 01:12 AM
I am learning these C++, C, and python

bufsabre666
January 15th, 2008, 01:13 AM
learning java in school, learned c++ 2 years ago in high school and learning python at home, but i would hardly say i know any of them inside and out but im good enough to make some simple programs

cwej
January 15th, 2008, 02:30 AM
Started with Basic, then Pascal (in college), Assembly (MASM), C++, and VB6...