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View Full Version : w32: Is your company forcing you to move from VB to VB.net ?



frenchn00b
December 24th, 2007, 01:13 PM
vb6 :
http://www.pozitifpc.com/editorblog/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/vb6.gif

VB .net:
http://www.scientificcomponent.com/images/pc_net_vb_code.jpg


Who the ... wanna rewrite all the years of work, of very complex VB6 programs to .net ?

Will companies force programers/users to pass to VB .net ? Is it allowed ?

daengbo
December 24th, 2007, 03:01 PM
I don't understand this at all. Sorry.

Steveway
December 24th, 2007, 03:06 PM
So what?
They allready made this choice when they choosed to use VB.
They could have used a real programming-language and be set but they didn't.
So it's their bad.

Mateo
December 24th, 2007, 04:03 PM
VB .net is very easy to program. I'm not even a programmer and I've figured out how to write stuff just by looking at example codes. The reason companies use VB and VB .net is because it is easily supported and very easy to code so they don't have to pay the equivalent salary of an advanced c or c++ programmer.

cprofitt
December 24th, 2007, 04:59 PM
VB.Net is a fine programming language for people who want to build business oriented applications quickly. It also excels at database connectivity.

Don't '****' on VB developers just because you think the 'language' is easy. Python and Perl are 'easy' but the programs written in them can be very complex. The 'difficulty' of the programming language is not a 'good thing' it is the ability of the developer to unleash the power of the computer through the language.

IMHO - 'easy' to learn is a good thing as it allows one to actuallly solve problems and not have to hunt down archaic language nuances.

Mateo
December 24th, 2007, 05:20 PM
i didn't mean to imply that it was a bad thing, I was simply explaining why a lot of companies use it. They can pay their programmers less and have quicker turnaround. Where I work they use a lot of vb.net and c#, i certainly don't think the programmers are stupid or anything.

Andiez
December 24th, 2007, 05:33 PM
I like VB.NET much better then VB. Sure it's a little different. But if you've been programming in VB for years I doubt it will be hard to pick up VB.NET.

Tundro Walker
December 24th, 2007, 08:42 PM
I think what the OP is focusing on is that there's some stuff in VB 6.0 that got wiped out from VB.NET. So, you're not guaranteed that all your VB 6.0 code will work in a VB.NET environment. You have to go through it all, and test, and test, and test. Really annoying.

When Win98 was developed, there was great pains taken for backwards compatibility, so much so, that they tested out tons of other programs and built-in special exception handlers to take care of old programs that didn't run nicely in Win98...letting them run nice.

With WinXP and .NET, a new mind-set was in MS at the time...the "screw the old stuff...we need to move on" mind-set. They re-wrote a lot of stuff, and in doing so lost some backwards compatibility (by choice or by consequence). It's ticked off a lot of Windows users who like old games / software, and it's ticked off a lot of VB 6.0 users.


If I recall, they supposedly had some "translator" program that would read through 6.0 code to find VB.NET compliance issues, or "rewrite" (?) it to make it VB.NET compatible. But, I think it was kind of "half-fast" (read that outloud to yourself, and you'll know what I mean).

SIDE NOTE: The OP wasn't starting a program language flame war. Please stop showing up here, waving whatever programming language banner you live under and shunning others because of it. VB is a viable language, tons of folks use it, and tons of companies rely on it. It's not a bad language b/c it's high-level, or whatever else you think is wrong with it. It's a "bad" language, b/c Microsoft owns it, and they keep doing stupid things like this with it that **** off the entire user base. Other than that, it's a decent language. Especially since it helps bridge the gap for some right-brain types to get into otherwise left-brained, technical programming.

cprofitt
December 26th, 2007, 05:50 PM
Tundro:

Yep. VB.Net does change code... though from what I know anything you could do in VB can be done in VB.Net -- just with different code.

I appreciate that Microsoft has done an excellent job in maintaining backwards compatibility, but there are times when they have to 'break away' from the old.

Apple, which many people hold up as an example, does this much more often than Microsoft... why do people get bent when Microsoft has to do it?

LaRoza
December 26th, 2007, 05:54 PM
I appreciate that Microsoft has done an excellent job in maintaining backwards compatibility, but there are times when they have to 'break away' from the old.

Apple, which many people hold up as an example, does this much more often than Microsoft... why do people get bent when Microsoft has to do it?

Python is going to make a major leap and it isn't entirely backwards compatible, it happens in FOSS too. Python is trying to make it painless, and they are doing a good job it seems.

Tundro Walker
December 27th, 2007, 09:49 AM
Tundro:

Yep. VB.Net does change code... though from what I know anything you could do in VB can be done in VB.Net -- just with different code.

I appreciate that Microsoft has done an excellent job in maintaining backwards compatibility, but there are times when they have to 'break away' from the old.

Apple, which many people hold up as an example, does this much more often than Microsoft... why do people get bent when Microsoft has to do it?

From a corporate stand-point, companies don't want to spend lots of time and money re-writing legacy software...especially if it's internal software which a re-write would just be cash tossed out the window. This is what makes C & C++ very functional...it's not like they're going to change any time soon.

But, VB programmers are cheaper compared to C programmers, and companies go for low cost. So, some companies end up feeling screwed by this, but really they screwed themselves. They toss resources at a programming language that MS controls completely, then they're slave to the master. It's not like MS controls C. But, C, while faster and with great range, is more complex to program in than VB (which is why VB programmers come cheaper). It's a catch 22, and I don't envy businesses for the decisions they have to make.

In the mean-time, I'll keep learning more Python, so I can get away from VB. LOL!

EDIT: Forgot to mention, I agree, too, that sometimes you just have to do away with old, out-dated crap. But, for gamers especially, it's annoying that a game they loved on DOS or Win95/98 no longer works on WinXP or Vista. Feel kinda cheated when something you paid money for no longer works. But, it's not like we're playing 8-track tapes on our mp3 players...gotta move on.