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phrostbyte
December 18th, 2007, 11:21 PM
I was thinking of an idea for a programming/IT competition.

Three teams:
The Windows Team, the MacOSX Team, and the Linux Team

Each team would have to tackle set of problems and the idea is what ever team manages to solve the most problems in a given set of time wins. The idea is each time may only use the operating system they represent to solve the problem.

What do you think? :confused:

:)

Kingsley
December 18th, 2007, 11:24 PM
I think Windows would win. But then again I don't know which problems would have to be tackled. :-k

toupeiro
December 18th, 2007, 11:30 PM
10 bucks says the best solution for all of them is to change OSes.


so, what do I win?

RussianVodka
December 18th, 2007, 11:30 PM
I was thinking of an idea for a programming/IT competition.

Three teams:
The Windows Team, the MacOSX Team, and the Linux Team

Each team would have to tackle set of problems and the idea is what ever team manages to solve the most problems in a given set of time wins. The idea is each time may only use the operating system they represent to solve the problem.

What do you think? :confused:

:)

Task one: Modify your kernel. :)
Task two: Seriously threaten to sue someone for modifying your kernel.
Task three: Don't do anything useful, but stand there looking cool.

As you can see, depending on what the problem is, a different team will have an advantage.

phrostbyte
December 18th, 2007, 11:31 PM
I think Windows would win. But then again I don't know which problems would have to be tackled. :-k

Well platform agonstic things that CAN be done on any platform. The main purpose of this competition would be to test the skills of the competitors, not stupid things like "run Photoshop lol".

Algorithim competition
Programming would be algorithms, like design a function "madlib" that takes two character array or string inputs returns a string. Something like this:

String one: The [foo] is really [adj] which I wish I could be like [foo]. His [wife] is really [adj].
String two: foo = anything1; wife = Jennifer Lopez; donut = yummy; adj = hot;

And returns this string: The anything1 is really hot which I wish I could be like anything1. His Jennifer Lopez is really hot.

These questions are short enough to be done in a short time frame but hard enough to force you to think. Can be written in any programming language, C, C++, Python, Java, C#, Bash Script, cmd.exe, VBScript, etc. as long as you can successfully run the algorithim on your platform

IT competition:
set up a web server with a site which echos anything sumbitted from it's "foo" form field back to the user.


Stuff like that.

Joeb454
December 18th, 2007, 11:35 PM
Well platform agonstic things that CAN be done on any platform. The main purpose of this competition would be to test the skills of the competitors, not stupid things like "run Photoshop lol".

Algorithim competition
Programming would be algorithms, like design a function "madlib" that takes two character array or string inputs. Something like this:

String one: The [foo] is really [adj] which I wish I could be like [foo]. His [wife] is really [adj].
String two: foo = anything1; wife = Jennifer Lopez; donut = yummy; adj = hot;

And returns this string: The anything1 is really hot which I wish I could be like anything1. His Jennifer Lopez is really hot.

These questions are short enough to be done in a short time frame but hard enough to force you to think.

IT competition:
set up a web server with a site which echos anything sumbitted from it's "foo" form field back to the user.


Stuff like that.

Anybody with a mild knowledge of C could whip that up ;)

phrostbyte
December 18th, 2007, 11:40 PM
Anybody with a mild knowledge of C could whip that up ;)

Yes, algorithms should test a competitors programming and logic skills and not their ability to memorize APIs or use IDEs. Just raw skills and any turing complete language should work reasonably well.

popch
December 18th, 2007, 11:40 PM
I think Windows would win. But then again I don't know which problems would have to be tackled. :-k

According to some here, Windows is the problem.

Joeb454
December 18th, 2007, 11:42 PM
According to some here, Windows is the problem.

LOL this is true, but also, the Windows Team would be disadvantaged, as it's not Open Source, it'll be harder to find code to fix the problems ;)

phrostbyte
December 18th, 2007, 11:44 PM
Lets say the competition lasts three hours and has up to 10 problems. The problems test both IT things and algorithim design. All problems must be possible to do on any of the platforms, with only the technologies which run natively on that platform. The team who finishes the most problems at the end wins, or if all teams get all 10, the time that get all 10 first wins.

fatality_uk
December 19th, 2007, 12:04 AM
Well platform agonstic things that CAN be done on any platform. The main purpose of this competition would be to test the skills of the competitors, not stupid things like "run Photoshop lol".

Algorithim competition
Programming would be algorithms, like design a function "madlib" that takes two character array or string inputs returns a string. Something like this:

String one: The [foo] is really [adj] which I wish I could be like [foo]. His [wife] is really [adj].
String two: foo = anything1; wife = Jennifer Lopez; donut = yummy; adj = hot;

And returns this string: The anything1 is really hot which I wish I could be like anything1. His Jennifer Lopez is really hot.

These questions are short enough to be done in a short time frame but hard enough to force you to think. Can be written in any programming language, C, C++, Python, Java, C#, Bash Script, cmd.exe, VBScript, etc. as long as you can successfully run the algorithim on your platform

IT competition:
set up a web server with a site which echos anything sumbitted from it's "foo" form field back to the user.


Stuff like that.

I take it you have just started your programming course :)

That challenge, err well unless your testing access to functions and API's that use the OS's GUI, it's just a C programming challenge and then it has nothing to do with the OS. If all the programmers are of an equal level, the the fastest typist will win :D If your working on using the GUI to display some functions, then, er VB it, slap some controls on a form quick, hash some code in the code pane and bam! Windows wins.

You REALLY wanna be responsible for seeing Linus Torvalds beaten by a spotty 19 year old with 3 weeks VB experience under his belt :lolflag:

red_Marvin
December 19th, 2007, 12:10 AM
A good algorithm should be cross-platform and more or less cross-language, or else it would be part implementing someone else's algorithm, so if the problems in the contest would be based on algorithm design it would only test the programmers skill, not really pit the os'es against each other.

phrostbyte
December 19th, 2007, 12:11 AM
I take it you have just started your programming course :)

That challenge, err well unless your testing access to functions and API's that use the OS's GUI, it's just a C programming challenge and then it has nothing to do with the OS. If all the programmers are of an equal level, the the fastest typist will win :D If your working on using the GUI to display some functions, then, er VB it, slap some controls on a form quick, hash some code in the code pane and bam! Windows wins.

You REALLY wanna be responsible for seeing Linus Torvalds beaten by a spotty 19 year old with 3 weeks VB experience under his belt :lolflag:

No man, I am nearly a CS graduate (technicaly I should grad since I've been in school for over 120 credits). I've been in programming competitions (ACM) and that's pretty much the type of questions they ask you. It sounds really easy until you actually program it man. Remember you have a matter of minutes to complete it if you want to score high. It's not a C programming challenge because the above can be done in many programming languages, and if you are confortable with C then C it is, but you can also do it in Python/Java/C# and maybe even with a little less code, but the point is that using a high level language shouldn't give you a major advantage, algorithms test logic skills not the robustness of the API or language. Look at the ACM competetion samples for more questions like that. And really in the three or four hours no one ever has been able to complete all 10 questions in the history of the challenge, even the top programming teams in MIT and Poland.

phrostbyte
December 19th, 2007, 12:14 AM
A good algorithm should be cross-platform and more or less cross-language, or else it would be part implementing someone else's algorithm, so if the problems in the contest would be based on algorithm design it would only test the programmers skill, not really pit the os'es against each other.

Yeah man, it would be cool if it tested the "users" or ermm "fanboys" of the OS more then the OS itself because that would be more subjective in the end anyways. :) In the end though they are representing their OS and maybe there is some recongition or award involved that somehow beneifits the person's perfered OS.

phrostbyte
December 19th, 2007, 12:21 AM
http://www.mcs.vuw.ac.nz/~david/acm/P9_Trees.pdf

Here is an example of an algorithm question. Some can be easier or harder then this but all competitors would get the same questions anyways.

sloggerkhan
December 19th, 2007, 12:31 AM
I think at university level there is some sort of competition like this where you have teams of 3 or so people who have to solve a programming challenge set of a few problems in a few hours.... Not sure what it's called, but I think It's sponsored by ACM and run through their student chapters?

hhhhhx
December 19th, 2007, 04:33 AM
i remember rading an article were some company actually did just this. but i cant remember where it was. all i know is that it was between win and Linux, windows won but only because the problems were problems you would only get in windoze :popcorn:

Tundro Walker
December 19th, 2007, 04:48 AM
You're looking at this from the wrong perspective...

Instead of having teams of experts...have teams of complete noobs...like grannies.

Team Granny Windows
Team Granny Linux
Team Granny MacIt's a 1 hour challenge, and they have like 10 tasks to do (since someone else already said 10)...things like...

Get your camera hooked up to the computer and download pictures from it
Open up a graphics program and remove the red-eye from a picture
Hook up your printer and print a picture
Make a self-playing cd out of those pics that you can give to your kids / grand-kids
Email your kid a message, and include a hyperlink to some place, and attach a pic
Write a letter to someone, and make it use double-columns, double-spacing & start off with and intro/address line, and end with a "from" lineThis would at least test the user-friendliness of the platforms.

After all the tests...each team gets to switch platforms and try it out on another one.

When it's all said and done, all 3 teams get to grade each platform for ease of use / frustration, etc.

Whichever platform gets the highest overall score wins.

Now, go raid the old-folks home, guys! Let's make this happen!

cprofitt
December 19th, 2007, 06:13 AM
I was thinking of an idea for a programming/IT competition.

Three teams:
The Windows Team, the MacOSX Team, and the Linux Team

Each team would have to tackle set of problems and the idea is what ever team manages to solve the most problems in a given set of time wins. The idea is each time may only use the operating system they represent to solve the problem.

What do you think? :confused:

:)

Well... I will take you seriously even if some others have not.

First.

Time might matter, but...

You might also want to consider - does the solution work -- allow a challenge phase where the other 'teams' can challenge the validity of the work.

You might also want to consider run-time -- some solutions might solve the test cases faster than other solutions.

Here is a site that does what you propose:

http://www.topcoder.com/

Check it out -- hope that it helps.

blithen
December 19th, 2007, 07:25 AM
Task one: Modify your kernel. :)
Task two: Seriously threaten to sue someone for modifying your kernel.
Task three: Don't do anything useful, but stand there looking cool.

As you can see, depending on what the problem is, a different team will have an advantage.
:lolflag:

popch
December 19th, 2007, 08:11 AM
http://www.mcs.vuw.ac.nz/~david/acm/P9_Trees.pdf (http://www.mcs.vuw.ac.nz/%7Edavid/acm/P9_Trees.pdf)

Here is an example of an algorithm question. Some can be easier or harder then this but all competitors would get the same questions anyways.

That kind of problem might be interesting to solve. The speed at whcih one arrives at a solution is, however, not a function of the OS employed (if any).

You'd just as soon use the number of point accumulated by the contestants for ranking the kind of vehicle used to come to the site where the competition is performed: bycicle, motor bike, tram, train, truck and so on.